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y- ^ VA STATE LI3HART 



SERIALS SECTION 
VA STATE -'""° 



Cape Henry Llglit 



53«l yetr, No. 36, \%. Beach, Vs. 



Viisjuim BeadiSiiii 

^^ The Official Newi^paper of Virginia Beach 

Wednesday, September 5, 1979 



VIRGINIA 

SEP I? 13^9 

STATEOBRARYJ 

One section — 15 cents 



Forty events to highlight festival 




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The time to celebrate Virginia Beach's Sixth Annual 
Neptune Festival has arrived. Over 40 separate festival 
events arc scheduled to take place September 6-16. The 
m^ority are free and will offer entertainment for aU 
i«es» 

The Neptune Festival is sponsored annually by \\» 
City of Virginia Beach and the Virginia Beach Chamber 
of Commerce. Ms. Starr Shotwell is this year's festival 
director. 

Festival highlights 

An Interfaith Prayer Breakfast will op^n the doors to 
the Sixth Annual Virginia Beach Neptune Festival at 
7:30 a.m. this Friday, Sept. 7, with a buffet breakfast of 
scrambled eggs, sausage, bacon, ham,"haish browns, 
danish rolls or bisquet. Dr. Pat Robertson of the 
Christian Broadcasting Corporation will host the event 
at Orion's Roof atop the Cavalier Hotel. Tickets are $3 
per person. Tom Holland is co-ordinator of the event 
and Curtis Catron is chairman. 

King Neptune VI will arrive at Rudee Inlet on 

"Pronlises Too" at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7. The 

Atlantic Fleet Band will play and Joe Lowenthal will 

serve as master of ceremonies of the arrival. Greeting 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^___^,^^ the King will be the seven Neptune Princesses. . 

I ^ I . This year's princesses, representing each of the 

Virginia Beach high schools, are: PrincMS Anne High 

* ^* f hlc DVPPlf School. Kimberly B. Arris; Cox High School, Rochelle 

I,UI9 fr CC Jk j.yjj„g Wallace; KempsviUe High School, Eileen R. 

Keener; Kellam High School, Tammy Kay Simmons; 

Arts anil mtcrlUaamit • • 4 First Colonial High School, Jodie Rundle; Cape Henry 

Ckarcli news 2 Collegiate School, Tammy Lou Burroughs; and Bayside 

CfaMtflcd • 11 High School, Doris Woodson. 

CoouBeatary 3 Masters Rence Shotwell, Robbie Unger and Maurice 

CoMMier interests • 5 Unger will serve as the King's pages, completing the 

HappcnlBgs 2 " Royal Party' ' . 

Lawn and pvtai. %..... 7 The "Royal Party" will proceed to the "Loop" 

Le^ m>tlecs S-10 where the Torchlight Parade will be forming to begin at 

SctfaMlte 6 7 p.m. "Future Trends of the Sea" wiU be the 1979 

Watwsports. • • • 12 theme and Chip Carter, son of President Carter, will 

- - serve as the Parade Grand Marshall. Master of 

^=~— ^ -^ , ceremonies will be Dick Lambe of WWDE Radio. The 




Close encounters 

Expect to see the U.S. Navy's Flight Demonstration Team, the Blue Angels, closely maneuver in an opposing solo 
routine during NAS Oceana's Neptune Festival Air Show and Open House set for Sunday, September 9. 



revie^g stand will be located at 24th and Atlantic. 

The Coronation Ceremony will begin at 8 p.m. at the 
Norwegian Lady on 2Sth and Atlantic. Jim Kincaid of 
WVEC - TV will serve as master of ceremonies and Kay 
Foulkes Young will serve as mistress of ceremonies. 
Chip Carter will crown King Neptune VI. Featured 
entertainment will be the Flagmen of Sansepolcro in co- 
operation with Rices Nachmans "Bella Italia" Sept. 4- 
22. 

The nagmen of Sansepolcro are recognized by the 
International Federation of Antique Games and Flag 
Sports and have travd«Llhe world over representing 



Italy, most recently at the opening ceremonies of the 
► Olympic Games and the World Cup of Soccer. 

The School of Music Band from Little Creek will 
serve as the coronation concert band and the Norfolk 
Naval Marine Color Guard will carry the colors. Mrs. 
Eleanor Unger is co-ordinator of the event and Mrs. 
Nancy Creech is chairman of the event. 

A grand Fireworks Display will immediately follow 
the coronation at 25th and Oceanfront, presented by 
Dixieland Displays. 



Working toward a cleaner community 



Street entertainment 



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ton of public is_- 
solution to litter problem 



ByPAMVANDEVEER 

Did you know research 
shows that most people 
habitually liter where 
trash is periodkally picked 
tq), like in a sports arena? 
Ch- where they feel no 
seite of ownenhip for the 
property, like in a park? 
Or whCTe trash is already 
accumulated, like in a 
restaurant parking lot? 

These are just some of 
the "litter known facts" 
being released by the Vir- 
ginia Beach Clean Com- 
munity Systrai, a program 
developed by Keep 
America Beautiful, Inc. to 
telp improve the public's 
attitudes and haMts about 
Uttering. 

"Litter is not the pto- 



Wan. Littering is," says 
Dorothy Castles, Clean 
Community Coordinator. 
"The goal of the Clean 
Community Task Force is 
to devetop a prc^am of 
normative change — to 
make people aware of and 
to change thdr littering 
habits." 

The Virginia Beach 
Clean Community System 
vras officially establish«l 
by the Virginia Beach City 
Council in April of 1978. 
It is made up of a task 
force of about 20 mem- 
bers appointed by the 
noayor. Hie group works 
on long range solutions to 
tlM city's littmng problem 
throu^ a program of 
planning, communica- 
tions, education in the 




schools, sustained cleanup 
and law enforcement. 

"We go to civic groups 
to speak and show slide 
shows to get them invol- 
ved in the program, and to 
make them aware that this 
problem exists," nqilains 
Ms. Castles. "Littering is 
such an accepted habit 
that most persons would 
be embarassed to speak up 
to a litterer. Therefore a 
main aspect of our pro- 
gram is education." 

Research has shown 
that in Virginia Beach 
about 30 percent of the 
litter we see strewn about 
us is caused by pedestrians 
and motorists. The re- 
maining 65 percent comes 
from improperly handled 
housdiold and commo:- 
dal trash, construction 
ind demolition sites, 
poorly maintained deli- 
very areas and uncovered 
trucks. 

"Virginia Beach doesn't 
have noany blighted resi- 
dential areas," comments 
Ms. Castles. "Since it is 
such a sprawling city we 
do have Icrts of roadside 
trash. And with so much 
«}nstnictien going on we 
have a lot of im-oUcts at 
construction sites. 

"Other (xmntries don't 
have the littering problem 
tlttt we have in the Unit^ 
^tes," she continues. 
"Prople just have diffe- 
rent attitudes. We iwed to 
develop in Americans a 
feeling of ownership for 
^blic property. People 
don't throw trash in their 
own yards, so why should 
they throw it in a jmblic 
place?" 

C^ proj«;:t that the 

Virginia Beach Clean 

CcMununity Task Forcx is 

%mki^ on is the updating 

Sie LITTER, p. 3 




A lof nmag contest wID te om of the UghHiMi of the NcptiM Fcsthrai Yonth Fair 
Day, schedoM for tetnrday, September 8, at Mount Trashmore. 

Beach wins Award of Excellence 
for pedestrian safety program 



The Tidewato- Auto- 
mobile A^>dation has 
announced that the City 
of Virginia Beadi has 
earn«l an Award of Ex- 
cellence for its adueve- 
ment in the prevention of 
pedestrian fatalities and 
injuries and for hs out- 
standing pedestrian safety 
program. 

The Award of Excell- 
ent is to be presmted to 
the Virginia Beadi City 
Council on Septonber 10 
by Ivan D. Mai9, a 
VRcmbtt of the BMrd of 
Directors of the TAA. 
E.W. Timmons, I^ietAor 
of Public Affairs of tht 
TAA noted that 2,7» 
cities and 25 states partici- 
I»ted in the AAA surv^ 
which evaluates and re- 
cognizes outstanding 
pedKtrian safety adiieve- 
mrats. 



The City of Virginia 
Beach won the top award 
from among 37 dties in 
the 200,00 to 500,000 
population group. The 
dty was recognized by this 
award for having achieved 
a death rate of 1.6 as 
com|»red with the pedest- 
rian death rate average of 
all dties in this population 
group of 4.2. Virginia 
Beach achieved a pedest- 
rian injury rate of 45 per 
100,000 population as 
compared with the aver- 
a^ of 96 for all cities in 
iMs population range. 

Unique in the nation, 
the AAA Pedestrian Pro- 
gram focusa attrition on 
^^edestrian safety needs by 
stimulating interest <»i a 
fecal levd in pedestrian 
•cddents and effective 
eounter-measure activi- 
ties. It spedfically awuds 



recognition to dties and 
states that have conducted 
successful pedestrian 
saf^y programs. Pedest- 
rian death and injury re- 
cords are among the deter- 
minants used to rate the 
dties. 

All communities partid- 
pating in the AAA pro- 
gram are judged with 
others of comparable size 
and diaracteristks. These 
characteristics cover pop- 
ulation (both dty and 
metropolitan); square 
mileage and rural, indust- 
rial, residential and major 
arterial h^way systems. 
Pro-am areas evaluated 
indude maintenance of 
accident records, safety 
legislation, enforcement, 
traffic engineering, 
quality of school traffic 
safety programs and pub- 
lic information and educa- 
tion im^rams. 



Street entertainment will put still more excitement in 
l}ie air Friday in the Dome and in the Dome parking lot. 
The Virginia Beach and Beach Borrough Jaycees will 
sponsor a fish Fry at 5 p.m. in the Dpme parking lpt._ 
Free outside entertaining will feature Tom Gwaltney's 
Dixieland Jazz Band and Blue Grass Storm Warning. 
The Heritage Dancers, Christian Rock Group and 
Greek dancers will also perform. 

Inside the Dome, the First Annual Neptune Festival 
Coronation Bop will begin at 8:30 p.m. with music by 
Fat Ammon's Band and oldies by Goldmine. Advance 
tickets are S3, $4 at the door. Keg beer will be sold. 

Youth Fair Day, a panorama of youth activities and 
entertainment sponsored by the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and Recreation, will take place 
Saturday, Sept. 8, from' 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Super heros 
scheduled to be on hand include Wonder Woman, Cat 
Woman, Bat Man, Robin and the Incredible Hulk. Also 
making appearances will be Pooh Bear, Ronald 
McDonald, Jack-In-The-Box and the 3 Milk Shakes, 
and King Neptune VI and the Royal Court. 

October will be celebrated Saturday, Sept. 8 between 
7 p.m. and 1 a.m. at the Virginia Beach Dome. The 
event is sponsored by the German-European American 
Society of Virginia. A dinner of German wurst, hot 
potato salad and sauerkraut will be available with 
beverages. Dance to the Oompah beginning at 9 p.m. 
Tickets are S3. SO per person and are available at the 
Dome and the Chamber of Commerce. 

Military day 

Sunday, Sept. 9, literally thousands will gaze into the 
heavens as the famous Blue Angels, skydivers from the 
Fort Monroe Sport Parachute Club, stunt pilot Dwight 
Cross Jr., and others perform breath-taking aerial 
demonstrations and skydiving feats over Naval Air 
Station Oceana in Virginia Beach. 

NAS Oceana has scheduled a spectacular 1979 
Neptune Festival Air Show and Open House from 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m. The air show will begin at 1 p.m. 

The Fort Monroe Sport Parachute Club will open the 
air show. Thdr free fall skydiving program will be 
followed by a demonstration by 0(«ana-based jet 
aircraft, stunt flying by Dwight Cross Jr. in his "Pitts 
Special" and of course, a 45-minute aerial finale by the 
renowned Navy Blue An^s. 

Free parking will be provided with guards directing 
guests to ample parking spots inside the base. 
Admission is free. Strollers to transport small tots from 
the parking lots to the air show area are sug^st(^. It 
will also be ^>propriate to bring either a folding chair or 
a blanket to sit on, as grandstand seating will be limited. 

There will be refreshments, kiddie rides, and aircraft 
on static display throughout the day in «ldition to the 
air show. 



Art Shows 

The HUMop Nortb-Wcst Art Show will be hdd 
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, Sq?t. 6, 7 and 8 at the 
Hilltop North aiKl W«t Shopping Cent«s. This ewnt is 
sponsored by the Hilltop North and West Kpferdumis 

See NEPTUNE l^STJVAi^p, $ 



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% 4riRGINIA BEACH SliNa'wEDNESPAY. SEPTEMBER S, 1979 



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Virginia Beach 
happenings 

Business wonien*s association 
holds fall enrollment event 

The Tidewater Chapter of the American 
Business Women's Association will hold a fall 
enrollment event Monday, September 10, at the 
Sword and Kilt Restaurant. Thalhimers. Military 
Circle. Social hour will start at 6 p.m. and dinner 
at 6:30 p.m. 

In recognition of the association's 30th 
anniversary, a special theme will focus on meeting 
personal and professional goals through ABWA 
membership. The goal of ABWA is to help women 
in business advance through education, increased 
competence and through upgrading of 
professional skills and business attitudes. 

Membership in ABWA is by invitation only. 
For further informaticm. contact June Calder at 
461-7251. 

Vocational spealcer for the evening will be 
Helen Ward. 

Retired of ficers' wives 
plan luncheon, fashion show 

The Retired Officers' Wives Society of 
Tidewater will gather for a champagne buffet 
luncheon and fashion show by Country Store at 
the Commodore Country Club, 3600 Southern 
Blvd.. Virginia Beach, on Thursday, September 
13. Social hour begins at 11 :30 a.m. and luncheon 
at 12:13. Reservations can be made by check only 
for $5.75 before Sept. 10 to Mrs. John E. Kehoe, 
4625 Hagan Dr., Virginia Btech. Va. 23462. 

Emmanuel Lutheran Church 
plans September activities 

Emmanuel Lutheran Church, 301 Lynn Shorn 
Dr., Virginia Beach, has announced its planned 
special activities for the month of September. 

September 8, at 9:30, will be Lutheran Day at 
King's Dominion. A Sunday Church School 0^ 
House will begin at 8:45 a.m. on Sept. 16. At 3:30 
p.m. that same day there will be a Sunset 
Congregational Pot-Luck Picnic at Piincen Anne 
Park -Section #1 (eat at 5 p.m.). 

Russell O. Siler is pastor. For more information 
call 340-3866. 



Pacing yourself is the Itey to working well 



Lynnhaven Parish DAR 
plans September activities ' 

The Lynnhaven Parish Chapto-, Daughtws of 
the American Revolution will meet Septemba- 8 at 
10 a.m. in the clubhouse building. Water Oaks 
Condominium. Mrs. Wilda C. Montero and Mrs. 
Eugene T. Connors will be hostesses for this 
meeting to which prospective members and guests 
are invited. 

Mrs. Murl 1. Estes of Hampton, director. 
District I Va. NSDAR, will be the guest speaker. 
She will address the NSDAR theme for 1979-1980 
"A Tapestry of Service." 

A report on a community wide cdebration for 
Citizenship Day to be held Sept. 15 at 4747 Shore 
Drive and plans for Constitution W^k Sept. 17- 
23 will be given by Mrs. Harvey Williams. 
Citizenship Day committee member. Mrs. 
Connors, regent, will extend the invitation to the 
District I meeting which will be held Sept. 25 at the 
Sheraton Inn, Military Circle. 

For further information, call Mrs. Connon or 
Mrs. Montero. 



Contact seeks volunteers 

Contact Tidewater Crisis Intervention and 
Referral Service announces its fall training 
program. Classes will be held Tuesdays at 7:30 
p.m. from September 18 through Deconber 11 at 
Virginia Beach United Methodist Church. 

The course includes the lecture series 
"Principles of Counseling" and' seminars 
conducted by specialists on such toptes as grief 
and depression, marital and other family 
problems, drug/alcohol abuse and human 
sexuality. Comprehensive group sessions will be 
led by experienced telephone workers. 

To register call Contact at 428-2211. Cimtact 
Tidewater is affiliated with Lifeline Int^national. 
There are currently 93 Contact centers in the USA. 



Free training course teaches 
how to care for handicapped 

The Virginia Beach* Depuntasm of Mental 
HoUth and Mental R^ardaticm will sponsor a 
training course, free of charge, for any adult over 
18 years of age who is intn'ated in iMming to 
provide care for the physically and nwntally 
handicapped. Indi^uals will earn S2.50 per hmir 
1^ in-oviding ResjHte Care after comfd^ion of the 
training course. 

Evening classes wiU be held Sept. 18 thrmifh 
Sept. 29. In wdet to n^ter cn- to otaau 
additional infcnmation, eoiMact the Virginia 
Beach R^te Chre Proinn A 499-?6|9. 



By REV. W. LEE TRUMAN 

There are few things in the world which have more 
sheer ddight attache! to them for me than an antique 
autMnoMle. As much as 1 idealize them and the struggle 
of men to find the mechanical perfection which we take 
tot granted, they did have their problems. 

One problem old-timers had was climbing long, steep 
grades. There was a go(xl chance of running out of fuel 
halfway up the hill. In the '20s, most of these old gems 
used a pumping system called the Autovac. It was a 
rather simply device in which the manifold vacuum was 
used to work a suction tank of approximately one gallon 
mou|ited on the firewall behind the engine. Gasoline 
was s'uck»l forward from the main rear tank and held in 
storage in the smaller tank, where it flowed by gravity as 
needed to the carburetor . 

Normally this system worked just fine, but when a 
person chost to climb a long mountain grade with the 
throttle wide open, the manifold vacuum dropped to 
idmost nothing. Without the vacuum pump, there was 
no gasoline being brought forward. It was not unlike the 
old windshield wipers that used to slow down when you 
put your foot hard on the accelerator. The problem was 
that impatient drivers piit their foot down hard on the 
throttle and rushed a hill in grand style for five miles 
until the auto gasped to a halt . 

Car after ck met this kind of trouble on venerable 




Let's 
talk 



passes, arid the non-wise were puzzled by this and had 
no idM why "old faithful" pooped out. Hie correct 
technique for driving a hiU with an Autovac was to use 
the lightest possible throttle opening and lowest gear 
needed and gattly let the car finds its own pace up the 
hill. If it threatened to stutter, let is coast to a stop at 
once and let it maintain a fast idle so the Autovace could 
recovor. 

Let me couple that with an incident that \»mppexaA 
when I was stiU in my midteens and I went to work in a 
steel mill. My job was to l(»d steel [rfpe onto a ramp for 
feeding an annealing furance. This has to be done every 
three minutes. I wtn-ked feverishly hard for two minutes 
and rested for one. I felt I was doing a fairly good job 
and could even show a loss of five pounds in three days 
to prove it. The bon fired me because he was convinced 
that I could not cut it. And looking back, he was 



abcoltttely right. Key advice came from an old steel man 
on the crew who watched me the first day and si^d, 
"Kid, you have to slow that d<wn and wwk steady or 
you will never make it." 

Hut was my first knowledge of pace. Uessed with the 
endless energy of youth, 1 never guc^ that I had any 
Umiu whatsoever. It never oixuned to om thtt th«« 
^rat a better way to work that would give best resuks in 
the long run. 

While climbing a long mountain pass aiul nurring 
akmg my Autovac, I thought about th« advice given 9^ 
by that n»n on the sted crew — take it easy, Aw dowii, 
work steadUy, keep slttggii)g away, do not exceed your 
capacity or you are going to haiw trouble. 

My (rid car has never stopped on a hill, new bdkd, 
wpm givai the slighter hint of Muttmng to a stop. 
^Miowvcr you find yourself in a siqwr teoir«ituatlon, 
wondering Ifhat you can possibly do to lohv you* 
probion. remember tfie key of dilvl^ ^h an 
Aittovac . .. you can dfanb any hill if you tidce it easy ud 
keq> a steady iHessurel I cannot bdieve that our Orettor 
designed us to live in fitful stans and stops, from M|^ ' 
to loira, from wM, fro^ied work to exhausted rest. The 
^wd Lord gaw us daies and senons tot everything, 
md wedoagreat deal better when we wwk with thitt in- 
mind. 



Beach churches announce September events 



LoadM Bridge Baptist Church, 2460 Potters Road, 
will hold the dedication of its New Family Life Cento- at 
7 p.m., Sept. 9. Call 486-7900 for information. 

Open Door Chapd will hold a Financial Seminar on 
Sept. 7 at 7:30 p.m. and Sept. 8 from 9 a.m. to noon. 

Marilyn Hickey, well known Bible Teacher will speak 
Sept. 12-13 at 7:30 p.m. 

A Family Living Seminar featuring Rev. Bill Stamp 
will be held Sept. 21-23. Call 340-1441 for information. 

Vir|iala Beach Commnnlty Chapd announces that its 



Amphibious Officers Wives Club 
plans September activities coffee 



Do you fit one of the 
foUowiny? Are you new to 
this area, or to the 
amphibs, in a rut, or tied 
to tots and house, or do 
you have a husband who is 
ahfvays out to sea? W/ 
may be just the shot in the 
arm you need. Why not 

ngive us a try? 

The Amphibious Offi- 

.j^euL Wives September 
Activities Coffee wiU be 
bekl at the Naval Annex, 
Little Creek, on Wednes- 
day, Sept. 12, at 10 a.m. 
Interested persons are 
invited to attend and sign 



up for one of the follow- 
ing activities: Japanese 
flower arranging, water- 
colors or oU paiQting, 
aluminum flowers, calli- 
g^raphy. Tidewater 
Women's Chorus or 
needlework. 

If none of the above 
appeal to yoii why riot' 
come anyway? You may 
runinto a long loM friend 
or end up by making many 
new ones. The AOWC 
cookbook will be on sale 
at the coffee. For more 
information call Mrs. D. 
D. Foberg at 497-6856. 



Mini Bible CoU^ began Sept. 4, and is hdd Tuesday 
eveninp 7:30 p.m. Late registration is permitted. 
Wednesday Ladies' Bible Study is held at 10 a.m. A 
nursery is provided. 

A Fall Missions Conference will take place Sq)t. 13- 
16. Rev. Roy Brill will be guest speaker. Call 428-1884 
for information. 

Taberaade Baplirt Chnrch, 717 Whitehurst Landing 
Rd., has weekly ladies' visitation Tuesdays at. 10 a.m. 
Thursday evenings feature church-wide visitations at 7 
p.m. 

A Back-to-School Revival will be held Sept. 5-7 at 10 
a.m. Tabemade Bai^ist School's cheerleaders are 
sponsoring a Spaghetti Dinner Sept. 7 at 6 p.m. in the 
gymnasium. 

A Round-up Visitation will take pUu:e S^t. 13-14 at 
7 p.m. and Sept. 15 at 2 p.m. A Round-Up Sunday on 
Sept. 16 at 10 a.m. will feature special music by Qatt 
Mazurek, former Opera singer. 

Prayer meeting are held each Wednesday at 7:30 
p.m. A church Father/Son Rshing Trip is scheduled 
Sept. 22. Dr. Nicky Giavers will pr«ent the Academy 
of Arts Players at Tabernacle Baptist School on 
Saturday, Sept. 29 in the evening. Call ^3St^^!ss 

Rock Chnrdi, 640 KempsviUe Rd.. will have as a 
guest on S^. 16-19, Rev. Mn Soto, pastor of the Rock 
Church in York, Pa. 

Rock Bible Institute begins Sept. 10. They wiU be 
havinft4)ay and Evening classes. Call the church and 
ask fo7 Mary Strickland. 499^1251, ext. 212. 

Rock Christian Academy opened Sept. 4, with grades 
K-4 through 12. 



City holds woii»hop to dliciiss 
Atlantic/Padflc Ave. corridor 

On Friday, SqMonber 14. tlw dty of Virginia 
Beadi will hdd » woitriK^ to evaluate the me- 
way streets and stacking lanes in the Atlantic 
Avenue and Pacific Avenue corridor. The 
wOTkdiop wiU be hdd at 2 p.m. in the meeting 
room at the Virginia Beach Ovic Cent^ (Dome). 

Other topics whidi may be discussed indude 
paridng fadlities in the resort area ud the like. 
All interested individuals are invited to attend. 



ON TELCVISiON WEEKLY!!! 

THE ROCK CNURCN 
OF VA. BEACH 

EVERY 

SATURDAY EVENHNI 

1(HOOF.M.ONCM 

CMANNEL27 

•AMNIfTinrOFiOB'SWMD 
• WECTSmWERS 




MrgMttMMirwHIi tatiay SirwtMiaiM u. « 10-^ 
•.M. aa< EvMriif San^cM 7:30 pjik 

MfMtaMtey ftrvieft lOnOMM. « 7;J0|kM. 

TlllltEII0T|JNIfi4<7-«Ma,4t74M3, 

4«7-4387 





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FRIEND 



99 



"A ami BMy wia a place witk U^ 
Aad pioadly boast of many things 
Hb devcr brain and bands have gained. 
And yet with aO hii heart be pained 
By kavii« miaaed Wc's only end, 
if he has never galacd a rricad." 



Charlie's Seafood Restaurant 

3139 SlMff Drive 491-MS3 

KeHanhEaton Insurance Co. 

3111 PacMc Avenue 42Miei 

Overton's Market 

1419 PiMeitor Utmt 54S-9496 
hm Ovartans and EmpieyeM 

Mill-Eml Carpet Shop 

4740 VblMi iMdi Mvd. 4974854 
Topiar a. Cirr and tHiNayeas 

Furniture Showrooms 

^P^i^F fc* ■••■^W VwV^^ff ^vw^^B 

2901 S. IHHafy MOhMy 



Andy's numbing and Heathif 

1003 Canal Drive 405-5000 

ilita4hflstarad4lew and OW Weill 

ICenpsville Pfwrniacy 





Todd Electric Comiiany 



Preston's naimacy 

1401 Mi^tv SIratt 945-7337 



dmsafpenke Savings and Loan 

ffiirii N. Weed aid Asttciilia 

Soitiieni States 



J.II.IMesaniS«tt,inc 



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VIRGINIA BEACH SUNDWEONESDAY. SEPTEMBER 5, 1979 3 




TCC offers Specialist in Aging certificate 



By D. WILLIAM mPCES 



Commentary 



Letters 



Citizen action can make a difference 

E^or, Virginia Beach Sun: 

The Tidewater Hairdressers Cosmetologist 
Association has selected a poster child for this year. The 
child is a resident of the City of Virginia Beach and a 
part tion resident of the Holiday House. 

The Holiday House was startwl in 1971 in the City of 
Portsmouth. It offers residential care for the mentally 
retarded from a^s three to dghteen. At the present time 
thne are approximately twoity residents, Ave of them 
are from Virginia Beuh. The facility has been under the 
Tidewato- Association for Retarded Citizens and 
(Mreviously was funded primarily by the City of 
Portsmouth. 

Hie City of Portsmouth has recently decided to 
cmtinue funding for the Holiday House, but to require 
that the residents from Virginia Beach be terminated 
unleu the City of Virginia Beach provides the funds for 
the residents from our city. 

The monthly expense for residential care is extremely 
high and the Gty of Virginia Beach has plans in the 
future to build its ow^ residoitial care facility. 

The poster child for the Tidewater Hairdressers 
Cosmet(dogist Association is thirteen years old and is 
mentally retarded. He is a beautiful child, but up until 
his residential care at the Holiday House he was setting 
fires in the home, breaking windows, having violent 
attacks and destroying rooms. He was not trained to use 
bathroom facilities, could not dress himself and he did 
not ha\w the self-hdp sktUs that everybody takes for 
granted. His mother has another child, a daughter, to 
nuM, and she was trying to raise both children by 
bersdf. It was impossible for her to take care of her 
normal duties and at the same time try to raise the 
poster child. 

The mother loves her children very much and 
recognized that the son needed help. He was placed in 
the Holiday House as a resident 18 months ago. Since 
that time, his sister has done extrememly well in tkat her 
grades have improved, her depression has disappeared 
and she is now a very healthy and flourishing young 
lady. 

The son has also shown remarkable improvements. 
He attmded the Tidewater Hairdr«ss«s Cesm^ologist 
Association's dinner meeting recently. He is a 
l^andsome 13 year old hojL «dio is now trained to use 

^^emarkabie reoov^andhas learned all the selMeli^ 

jkills. 

The child now comes home three nights each week 
and eventually will be able to come home permanently. 
If it wtte not for the Holiday House I don't know what 
would have happoied, but we know that this handsome 
13 year old child would not be progressing at the present 
rate. 

The Holiday House drastically needs funds for some 
duldren who really need its help. The Portsmouth 
Exchange Club recoitly made a donation, and I hope 
that many of us in Tidewater will do likewise. You may 
said your donation to "Tlie Holiday House Fund" and 
mail it to The Tidewater Association for Retarded 
Citizens, 906 Ingleside Road, Norfolk, Virginia 23S02. 

These children despo-ately need a chance, and we can 
be a great deal of help if we send a donation. We are 
forming a committee to raise money for this worthwhile 
project. I urge all of you who are interested to call my 
office at 486-7711, or come by my office at 2420 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, Virginia Beach, to sign up to 
join this worthwhile endeavor. 

This is a perfea example of priviue dtizois trying to 
help berause the govemoMnt cannot do aU things for all 
peo|rie. Please send ymir contributions to the address 
idx>venMntioned. 4 

A. Joe Canada Jr. 

State Senator 

Virginia Beach 



Reunion is successful 

Editor, Virginia Beach Sun: 

We, the Broad Creek Village Reunion Committee, 
tlnmk ^ni aiMl ymir staff for the publicity given to our 
July 28tb and ^h reunion events, in your paper. 

Your &mtimeA efforts contributed tmmensdy in 
making our reunim a success. 

Sincerdy, 

Walto- G.Bryan 

Chairman, 

B.C. V . Reunion Committee 



V^iginJaBeadiSon 



u^sfia-140 
HMmByerly 



Do«MR.Fryc 
Pmm VaMtevccr 



The Vir^nia Beach camptis is offering a one-ytar 
Specialist in Aging certificate program for the first time 
during the upcoming fall quarter. The program allows 
students to examine the problems of the rapidly 
expanding aged population in the United States. 

The curriculum is designed to provide indents with 
the factual knowledge and experience necessary to gain 
employment in facilities which care for the aged and 
should be of special interest to those who are interested 
in working in such facilities or to th<Me who ah-eady do 
so. 

The program should also be of interest to volunteers 
who work with the eldo-ly poi»ilatfcHi and to those who 
find themselves reaching ^he stage of life when they have 
a pvsonal interest in the problons to be fand by the 
aged. 

The curriculum features health courses in first aid and 
cardiopulmonary resusciation, the psychology of aging 
and the social problems of the elderly, as well as 
nutrition, gerontology and a course devoted to the study 
of death, dying, and society. 

Courses for the Specialist in Aging program are 
scheduled during both daytime and evening hours to 
accommodate those who work and attend classa. 

A three-hour internship is a requirement of the 
program, with each student working as a voluntjper in an 
agency or facility which serves the aged population. 
Prior work experience counts toward the internship, so 




Today 
college 
counts 



that those who are employed in elderly care can receive 
credit for their on-the-job training. 

As the percentage of elderty citizens in our soci^ 
increases, the need for programs to improve the care of 
the aged and to deal with the problems of aging also 
grows. Tidewater Community College is pleased to 
offer this program in elderly care and hope that it will be 
a service to the community. 

For further information, contact the Hunuuiities 
Division at the Virginia Beach campus, 427-3070. 

Today college counts! 

A rcmiader: For the first time this fall, the Virginia 
Beach campus is offering two courses in Manual 
Communications Skills (sign language) for oedit. 
Beginning and intermediate level courses are available 
to teach students to communicate with the deaf. 
Information on course times and requirements can be 
obtained from the Humanities Division. 



Medicare does help during a hospital stay 




IMaatBiMiiaa SoadraOccf ViddtNeU 



Your 
number's 



By HARVEY RIDINGER 

Medicare can help pay the expenses of a hospital stay 
for people who have this protection. 

When Medicare hospital insurance can cover a 
hospital stay, it will pay for all covered expenses for up 
to 60 days in each benefit period except for the hospital 
insurance d^uctible, currently Si 60. For the next 30 
days, hospital insurance i«ys for all covered services 
except for $40 a day. 

Covered services include semi-private room and 
meals, routine nursing^ service, special care units, drugs 

j NEPTUNE FESTIVAL 

from page J 

Association and coordinated by Ms. Roslyn Stalcup of 
Womoms Arts & Crafts. Over 150 artists will 
partidiMte in the show. 

Judging will take place on Saturday, Sept. 8. The 
. show hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursday and 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Cash prizes will 
be given for seven merit aw^ds, seven honorable 
mentions, best in the show - cAfts, best in the show - 
fine arts and for the Dick Cossitt Memorial award as 
well as for most promising artist. 

The Showmobile wiU be at Hilltop North and West 
Saturday with continuous entertainmoit beginning at 1 1 
a.m. 

Saturday, Sept. 8 will spotlight the "Youth Art 
Show" at Hilltop North and West Shopping Centers 
with Ms. Louise Lowenthal as chairperson of the event. 
Selected students from each of the dty's secondary 
schools are invited to display thdr art work, which will 
be judged for cash awards and ribbons presented by 
King Neptune VI and the Royal Party attending along 
with the Woidy's character assisting. Wendy's, Inc. is 
the sponsor for the Youth Art Show. 

The Neptune Festival Boardwalk Art Show is 
featured the secoml weekoid of the festival, Friday the 
14th from noon to 6 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday, the 
15th and 16th, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is sponsored by 
the Virginia BeKh Arts C^ter and is coordinated by its 
director, Anthony lUdidi. Tlie show will be located 
fi-om 27th Street north on the Boardwalk. Siow 
catagories are painting, wato^ colors, graphics, drawing, 
sculpture, crafts (fiber glass, wood, metal aiKl clay), and 
photography. 

Entertainment for all ages 

A Caltnral Mcd^ will take place on Wednesday, 
Sept. 12 at the Virgiiiia Beach Dome banning at 7:30 
p.m. You can enjoy an evening of theatrical 
e«tatainment and music with Faye Winfidd Edwards, 
Jack Nebon and Tom Gwaltney. Adnusiion will be fi^ee 
and wine and cheese will be available. The evoiing will 
be funded in party by the City of Virginia BeMh 
through the Virginia Beach Arts and Hunmities 
Conmission ami is coordianted by Eleamr Un^ with 
diairperson Ms. Nancy Creech. 

The SmIm- a^eu BaU wiU take fhtx ITiursday. 
Sept. 13 from 8 to 1 1 p.m. at the Virginia BMch Dome. 
The admission is free and the cdebrity warn will be 
Gene Walters of Farm Fre^ Supermarket. 

CoBiiry Fi* Itay » Friday, Sept. 14 at tN Farmer's 
Markd, t^nnii^ at 4 p.m. This event is spoi»«ed by . 
VPI Extension. A barbeque supper will be available 
along with a kissing booth, a petting sw and a ulmxo 
spittin' contest. Mayor Patrick Standing will oncee a 
^m milking contat. 

A Sweat AdidlM - Barter Skop Qmnet CwMtrt will 
be sponsor^ 1^ tlw Jaycees on Friday, Sept. 14 at the 
Virginia BMch Dcmie banning at 7:30 p.m. Tfekets are 
S3.50 per pcnon and are available through the HyccKt 
the Dome and the Virginia Beach Clwmber of 
Comn^ce. 



furnished by the hospital, operating and recovery 
rooms, rehabilitation services. X-ray and other 
radiology services, and lab tests. 

Hospital insurance does not cover personal 
convenience items, private duty nurses, any extra charge 
for a private room unless medically necessary, and the 
first 3 pints of blood received in a benefit period. 

In addition. Medicare medical insurance can help pay 
doctor bills and some other covered expenses during a 
hospital stay. 

Medical insurance can cover doctors' visits and 
services of a surgeon. Medical insurance generaUy pays 
80 percent of the reasonable charge for covered services 
after the $60 annual deductible is met. 

More information about how Medicare helps with the 
cost of health care can be found in the leaflet, "How 
Medicare Helps During a Hospital Stay," or in "Your 
Medicare Handbook." Copies of either publication can 
be obtained at the Norfolk Social Security office, 
located in Room 600 at 200 Granby Mall, Norfolk, 
23510. The phone number is 441-3401. The office hours 
are^a.m . to4:30]p.mr^^ "^ 



LITTER 



from /Mff / 

of tlie dty'i Utter ordi- 

lUUICCS. 

"We found that all the 
Bead Vtta ordinance 
wtn aeattired throughout 
the dty code," recalls Ms. 
Casttei. "Tb* task force 
has cotninled all new ordi- 
aancet and consdidated 
tbcraimo one section. The 
reviled (vdinances will 
now go to City Council 
fot iu a^voval." 

If passed, a coiv of the 
new ordHnanoes will be 
mMled to cvCTy residence 
in Virginia Beadi. Iliere 
will be a pmod of volun- 
tary coaq)liaiice, then the 
ordinances, will be en- 
fotocd. 

; "But enforcement is the 
very last step," Ms. Cast- 
les is quick to add. "Most 
importantly we ««nt to 
develop a positive attitude 
in the community toward 
curbing litter." 

The task force hopes to 
get a dty-wide recycling 
program started, and wd- 
comes any suggestions 
from interested indivi- 
duals. Newspapers, alumi- 
num and glass are the 
main objects that could be 
recyded. 

"New8p4>en fill our 
laadfllls at a rapid pace.*" 
Ms. Ca^es notes, point- 
ing out how quickly our 
home tradi cans become 
filled with old news- 
papers. "We hope to place 
a lot of bins for dqxMits in 
stratigic places in the 
dty." 

Hie task force also 
hopes to place about 50 
signs bearing the Virginia 
Beach Qean Community 
%go nev diSui^ 



ces to and throughout the 
dty as a reminder to 
dtizens not to litter. 

H^ group plans to 
sponsor a booth at the 
upcoming Neptune Festi- 
val Youth Fair Day at 
Mount Trashmore on 
Septanber 8. There they 
will silk scr^n any indivi- 
dual's T-shirt free of 
charge with the Clean 
Conununity System logo 
and the words "Youth 
Day Supports a. Clean 
Conununity." 

How does the Gean 
Community Task Force 
measure the results of all 
its efforts? One way is 
through a photographic 
study in which representa- 
tive areas throughout the 
dty, such as beaches, con- 
struction sites, streets and 
parking lots, are photo- 
graphed periodically 
throughout the program 
to see what improvements 
have been made. 

Another way is through 
dtizen attitude surveys 
conduded periodically in 
the dty. The most recent 
attitude survey, conducted 
last winter, showed that 
Virginia Beach dtizens 
have a fairiy good aware- 
ness of the city's litter 
problem and individuals' 
attitudes toward littering. 
A new survey will be 
conducted in the dty this 
September and October. 

Groups and individuals 
interested in learning more 
about the Virginia Beach 
Clean Comnuinity System 
should contact Ms. Cas- 
tles at the Virginia Beach 
Munidpal Center, Vir- 
ginia Beach, VA 23456; 
phoBc, 427-4.^rr=~^ 



^"^7 » 



-T-t 



-TheSandcastlc Ckusie will take place Saturday, Sept. 
15, between 7th and 9th Streets along the Oceanfront. 
This event is sponsored by Sea Port Supply. The Dixie 
Squares Ball will be held the same day at the Virginia 
Beach Dome, sponsored by the Dixie Squares. There 
will be no admission charge to spectators. 

A Neptune Tcea Disco Dance will be held Saturday, 
Sept. 15 from 9:30 to 12 p.m. at the Plaza Roller Rink. 
Prizes will be awarded. 



Heritage Day 

On Sunday, Sept. 16 at noon, the Sixth Annual 
Virginia Beach Neptune Festival Heritage Day 
celebration wOl begin. Over forty participating ethnic 
groups win have booths set up from 27th Street, south 
on the Boardwalk. The focal point of the celebration 
will be at 25th and Atlantic at the Norwegian Lady. 

United Airlines is sponsoring Heritage Day. 
Hawaiian Airlines if providing the Hawaiian Air 
Serenades and Dancers, a group of professional 
Hawaiian entertainers who sing and dance around the 
world, who will be the feature entertainment 
throughout the day. 

E«;h ethnic group will perform related to thdr 
spedfic background throughout the day around thdr 
booth and will be spotlighted on the schedule at the 
Norwegian Lady where a fitting motif will prevail. The 
booths will sell food and crafts representative of their 
"heritage". 

Miss Kylene Barker, Miss America 1978, wUl serve as 
mistress of ceremonies along with master of ceremonies 
Peter Decker. Miss Barker is brought to the NeiMune 
Festival courtesy of First & Merchants Bank and will 
make an appearance at the Laskin Ro»i F A M Bank 
branch on Monday, Sept. 17, at 9 a.m. 

Sports events 

The Yoatli Teniiis TonwuMat wiU be hdd on 

Saturday, Sept. 8. For infcnmation call the Virginia 



Beach Parks and Recreation Department. Saturday, 11 
a.m. to 4 p.m. will also feature the Tidewater Sports 
Car Ctab Show at the Dome parking lot. At noon, Sept. 
8, the Virginia Section of Mercedes Benz Club of 
Ameria will hold a car show at the Cavalier Hotel. 

The NeiHune Festival Tidewater Sports Car Club 
Alto CroM will begin on Sunday, Sept. 9 at 11 a.m. 
from Camp Pendldon. The Neptune Festival Five Mile 
Race will be held on Sunday, Sept. >9 at 2 p.m. at Mt. 
Trashmore and is sponsored by the Tidewater Striders. 

The NeptuM Bowi will begin at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, 
Sept. 14 at Princess Anne High School. Kellam will 
verse Princess Anne at this event. 

The Tidewater Soap Box Derby Fail RaUy will be held 
on Saturday, Sept. IS from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. at Mt. 
^rashmmv. Tlie rain date is Sunday, Sept. 16. 

Hie Whadchair Baakctbail Game will be held on 
Saturday, Sq)t. 15 at 8 p.hi. at Plaza Junior High 
School. The Virginia Beach Sun Wheelers will verse the 
Big Wheels of Fishersville. 

A complde schedule of Neptune Festival events can 
be found in the entertaiiunent section of this week's 
Virginia Beach Sun. For more information on festival 
adivites call the Virginia Beach Chamber of Commerce 
at 490-1221. 



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BEACH SUN, please mail this form with { 
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Miginia Beach Son 



SM¥w.N«.3i 
PiiMlifeMl cvtry WttenAv by tywAj PabNortloM with ttt 
malR office located M 131 R«mmM Roa«. Vii|tali 
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suBscsirnoN. i 

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PLEASE C»ECX HERE D if yoa are BOW rccdvlBg I 
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4 ^GINIA BEACH SUNG WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1979 






Arts aii 



^S|7J[SESin!SrSn? Pftste^ landscapes open fall season 

emenainment ^^ ^ .^„j, j^y^ ^^ ^^^^^ 




Big. colorful landscapes 
in pastel by Dorothy 
Fagan will open the fall 
exhibition season at the 
Virginia Beach Arts 
Center on Sq>tnnber 8. A 
reception for the artists 



will be held that Saturday 
evening at 8 p.m. at the 
center. 

Ms. Fagan. who lives 
near Franklin with her 
teacher-husband and her 
one-year old twins. 



A knockout 



Virgliiia Beach boxer Bobby Acey •tandi above oppoMot Johaay Barr after 
kBockiog him ont at 1:04 !■ tbc uamd roaod of thdr pro boat at tbc Virginia Beach 
Dome but Thursday aight. Local champ Acey is now looking forward to a Dome 
fight Sept. 20 with Alfoaso Hayman, tbe only boxer who hai beaten Um to date. 



Audition dates announced 
for Children's Cultural Festival 

Residents of Virginia Beach are preiMring to join the 
celebrations for the Imemational Year of the Clild. A 
Children's Cultural Festival featuring performance of 
talented local children representative of many 
intemati(Mia] cultural groups will be hdd at Plaza 
Junior High Sdiod on Saturday, October 20, at 2:30 
p.m. 

Show auditions for children, or children's performing 
groups, will be hdd at IHaza Junior High School on 
Septonber 24 and 25 from 7 to 10 p.m. All children ages 
three to 18 inay audition, but they must come with a 
fully iN-epared act. Any choral group or band, or 
theatrical group with performers in the above category, 
is invited to audition. Children of any particular 
national origin are mcouraged to perform in national 
costume, in keqnng with the international flavor of the 
event. 

For ftirther infonwuion and to make an anointment 
for an audition contact Kathleen McBhdr at the 
Kempsville Recreation Cqiter, phone 467-4884. 



graduated in printmaking 
with a minor in {Minting 
from East Carolina 
University in 1974. , She 
works from nature, 
drawing and keeping notes 
which, she blows up into 
semi-abstractions. The 
subject is real but the 
treatment is not reidistic, 
she says. 

Her main interest is in 
(xtloT, whether laid on the 
smoothish Arches rag 
paper she likes or mixed in 
the viewer's eye in the 
manner of the 
Impressionists. Van Oogh 
is the painter who has 
most influenced her. Tlie 
break-up of space and the 
play of visual texture are 
other elements in her 
work. 

In the center's hall 
galleries will be two and 
three dimoisional works 
by West Coast Imagists. 
Hie pieces are so intmse 
and unusual that the show 
is entkled Likt Nothing 
You've Ever Seen 



B^ore. It includes 
prismatic color drawing 
and objects in bokes that 
evoke tiny personal 
worlds. Seen last year in 
Qiicago. the exhibit was 
oiymized by Inez Storer 
of Lester gallery in 
Northern Calif omia. 

The Arts Center, which 
offers a wide range of 
exhibitions, programs, 
classes and ev^ts, is 
located at 1711 Arctic 
Avenue. The hours are II- 
4 daily except Sundi^. 
there is no admission 
charge. 



EXTRA CASH 

It'i iQ easy. . .advertiM tlw 
thiogiyouao lonao' Bced in the 
ctaHilM cohimiH of your 
hoawtomi iicwi|M|)cr. In 
practically no time at ail, people 
. in your neiiliboriiood wfll imow 
wiiatyoaliawetoieil. You'icon 
die road to van carii. . . 
KMBCbodly wid read your ad and 
buyl 



Tkatm Dal -Tm mmt Taar 
bOOAL Uwmmfft 



Things to do this week in Virginia Beach 

6th Annual Virginia Beacli Neptune Festival schedule af events 



9:00 a.m. 
7:30 p.m. 

9:00a.m. 

10:00 a.m.- 
9:00 p.m. 

7:30a.m. 



Wcdaciday, Sqitcmlicr 5 2:00 p.m. 

Scaior gMicn Golf TowMUMBt, Va. Beach Recreation 

Center, Bow Creelc. (Sponsored i>y Parks and Recreation) 

Ncplaac Festival Blago — Sponsored by Temple 7:30 p.m. 

Emanuel. 

Tbarsday , Scplcnibcr 6 

SMior attnas Golf Toaraamcat, Va. Beach Recreation 1 :00 p.m. 

Center, Bow Creek. (Luncheon and Awards at 1 :00 p.m.) 

Himop North A West Sixlli Aamial SidewaU Art Show. 

Hilltop North & West Shopping Center. 



Neptaae Festival Five Mile Race, Mpuat Trastaaofe. 

Sponsored by the Tidewater Striders. Information 

Number, 461-0S27. 

Biago, Va. Beach Dome, sponsored by Va. Beach Civic 

Ballet. 

Mowiay.ScplcailMrlO 

Showing of the nims "Chesapeake Bay Challenge". 
"The Chesapeake", and "The Billion Dollar Marsh" at 
the Virginia Beach Dome. Admission Free. 



Beadi Dome. S^woiored by J^cees. Hckett $3.50 per 
person. Tidcet available Jaycect. Dune and Chamber erf 
Cemmcroe. 



10.00 a.m. 
9:00 p.m. 
6:30 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 
8:00 p.m. 

9:00p.m, - 
11:00 p.m. 



8:00 p.m. 



8:00a.m.- 
4:00 p.m. 
9:00a.m.- 
4:00 p.m. 



9:00-a.m. 

10:00 a.m.- 
6:00 p.m. 



Friday, September 7 

latcrfallb Prayer Breakfast, Cavalier Hotel-Orion's 
Roof. Tickeu $5.00/per«6i». AvaiUtUe it' CKaAiber of 
ONsnerce. : . : ,.. lr,,..^■^'. ~ ^,U.,\-,n\ ';;•/- 

- Hilltop North a West Sixth Aannal Sidewalk Art Show. 
Hilltop North ft West Shopping Center. 

Ktag NeplaM VI's arrival, Rudee Inlet. 

TorchUglu Parade. 

CoroaadoB Ccrcmoay A Fireworks. Norwegian Lady. 

(Rain date for fireworks 7:30 p.m. Sept. 16th) 

- Street EatcrtahuMit. Va. Beach Dome and parking lot. 
Inside Dome, Bop Dance. Sponsored by Jaycees. Tickets 
available Jaycees, Dome and Chamber of Commeree. 
$3.00 per peaoa advance, $4.00 door. 

Polish Saasage Eatiag Contest. Demin-Folocks 
Restaurant. 19th ft Atlantic. 

Satarday, Septembers 

- YonUi Tcaois ToaraamcM, Mt. Trashmore. Contact 
Parks and Recreation at 4«7-4884. 

Yoath Fair Day, Mt. Trashmore. Sponsored by Parks 

and Recreation Panaorama of Youth Activity Art Show 

* Entertainment. Celebrity Guest. Super Heroes Wonder 

Woman. Bat Man, Robin, Penguin ft The Hulk ... 

Melissa Lewis.. .Pooh Bear. 

Neptaac Heritage Calanuraa RIbboa Race (Begins at 5th 

Street) 

HHHop North ft West Sixth Aaaaai SMew«lk Art Show 

and Sixth Annual Youth Art Show. Hilltop North A West 



Tkcsday, September 11 
8:00p.in. Showing of the nims "Chesapeake Bay Challenge", 
"The Chesapeake", and "The BiUion Dollar Marsh" at 
L t.btte Yirsiiii% Beach Dome. Admission Free. 

Wcdaeaday, September 12 

7:3ap.m. OtlBiial W«ll^ — ^^tginia Batch Dome feafuiing Faye 
Winfleld Edwards, Jack Nelson and Tom Gwaltney. 
Admission Free. 

Thnraday, Scptembo' 13 

All Day SealoratiieuAppredalloaDay, Visit to Area Hospitals 

andH(»nes. 
8:00 p.m. — Senior OtlzeBS Bail, Va. Beach Dome. Sponsored by and 
1 1 :00 p.m. Recreation A Va. Beach Fed. Savings A Loan. Admission 

Free with ticket. 

Friday. September 14 
10:00 a.m. — Senior CItlzeas Lancheoa. Va. Beach Recreation Center, 
2:00 p.m. Bow Creek. Sponsored by Parks A Recreation. 
12:00 Noon— Neptnae Boardwalk Art Show (27th North on 
6:00 p.m. Boardwalk) Sponsored by Virginia Beach Art Center. 
4:00 p.m. Coaatry Fair Day, Farmer's Market. Sponsored by VPI 

Extension. Music, Food, Games, and Contests. 
7:30p.m. Neptaae Bowl. Princess Anne High School — Kellam vs. 

Princess Anne. Tickets $1.50 — Gen. Admission. 

Children under 12 $1 .00. 
7:30 p.m. Sweet AdaUae Barber Shop Qwvtet Concert. Virginia 



8:00 a.m.- 

5:00 p.m. 

10:00 a.m.- 

6:00 p.m. 

12:00 Noon 

12:00 Noon 

2:00 p.m. 

2:00- 

4:00pim. . 

7:30 p.m.- 
11:30 p.m. 



8:00 p.m. 



9:30 p.m. 
12:00 
Midnight 



10:00 a.m. - 
6:00 p.m. 

12:00 Noon 
6:00 p.m. 



7 JO p.m. 



8ntarday,SaplaBihfrM 

- TMtaralar 8«« Ban Dirfey Fal Bally at Mt. lYashmore. 
Rain Dtfe. Sunday Stpt. 16. 

- NaplMw ■aarlmk Art Show (27th Street North on 
Boardwalk) ^xmtoied by Va. Beach Art CentCT. 
Snadcaatia dairic (Location: 7th to 9th Streets). 
S^XMUored by Sea Port Supply . 

-DUcSvniH laod Daaet Wo* Shop. Dome. 

S^wwc daaet woili *op at Va. Beach Dome. 

■ '■, .! ■;,. ,l;i -l,-\:-. ■:•■ , . ;.. ...; 

- Dixie a^ a a r m ■ aB. i Va. Be^ch.Damei a p — ko iul ay ^iw 
Dixie Squam. No chaqe to spectators. (7:00 p.m..— 
8:00 p.m. Round Danoe) (8.-00 p.m. — 1 1 :30 p.m. Square 
Dance). 

Neyiaae Whe i fc halt ■ aikH h a ll Cmmi. Haa Junior High 
SdMOl. Va. Beach Sun Wheden A Big Wheels of 
Flaherville. 9oasond by Va. Beach Parks A Recreation. 
-NoptHH Periinil Tae»-Diico noaee Plaza Roller Rink. 
Prizes to be awarded. For information call Mr. Ratte, 
340-7190. 

Suday.SapknibarU 
-Ncplaaa Boariwalk Art Show, 27th St. N. on 

Boardwalk. Spcmsored by Va. Beach Art Cotter. 
-Hcfitage Day Opening Ceronony (Norwegian Lady). 

Continuous Entertainment by Ethnic Groups on 

Boardwalk at 24di and 27th Streets. Sponsored by United 

Airlines and featuring iCyiene Barker, Miu America 1978. 

Waefit Va. Beach Dome, qmiiored by Va. Beach Ovic 

Balkt. 

All events ireeuidess 

otherwise noted. 

Scbedide subject to change. 



LIVI ON STAM 

TIDEWATER 

DINNER 

THEATRp 

Present^i 

Utiaeriha ^ 

By low^iwa •emoft 

A note af abaaiMiad tan, immwim, and fare* b stniS" 
bf Hm TIMWATn DMMn TMUTK't prodnctlom 
"UMin Tm YUM VUM Tm." TMa cMMdy it abMt 
• |Mr «f ivIiidaiMiy ehiiila awMthaarte 4lMl% tta 





Tidewater 
Dinner Theatre 

JIWT OFF M4s NOKTNAMPrON KVD EXIT 

ATUMtWrnONT 

NNHTLV CXeiPT MONDAYS; QMW OMCOUNTt 

MSniVATIONS: 4tl.2933 



Shopping Center. 

Neptaae Tidewater Sports Car dab Show — Dome 
Parking Lot. 

Vlr^^ SecUoa of Mercedes Beat Chib of America, lac. 
Car Show. Cavalier Hotel — Judging at 1 :00 p.m. 
Skateboard Contest, Mt. Trashmore. Sponsored by 
Lynnhaven Optomist Gub. 
7:00 p.m. — Octoberfest, Va. Beach Dome. Sponsored by the 
Gemuui-European American Society of Va. Dinner — 
German Wurst, Hot Potato Salad. Sauerkraut will be 
available with beverage. Dance to "Oompah" music 
beginning at 9:00 p.m. Tickets $4.50 per person. 
Avaikble Dome and Chamber of Connnerce. 



II:00a.m.- 

4:00p.m. 

12:00 Noon 

2:00p.m. 



1:00 a.m. 



Sunday, September 9 

10:00 a.m. — Military Day — Naval Air Station Oceana. Air Show 
featuring The Blue Angels — 1:00 p.m. Carnival Rides, 
static display of aircraft, concessions, Military 
information booths. In participating hangers. 

11:00a.m. - Neptaae Tidewater Sporto Car Clab Sth AMuai Auto 

5 :00 p. m . Cross. (Camp Pemileton) 



Stained glass classes offered 



The Tiffany Touch 
Stained Glass Studio and 
School of Virginia Beach 
has announced fall class 
schedules. Professional 
instruction for beginners 
will be offered for two 
grou|», limited to eleven 
studmts each, beginning 
September 25, on eight 
Tuesday evenings from 
6:30 to 8:30. and on eight 
Wednesdays from noon to 
2 p.m. A copperfoO work- 
shop will follow. 

Lampmaking will be 
taught for advancKl sti^- 
ents who have previously 
completed the Tiffany 
Touch \i^xam coune or 



who have equivalent ex- 
perience in glasscutting 
and fabrication. Hie lamp 
class, also limited to ele- 
VCR students, will meet 
eight Thursday evenings 
from 6:30 to 8:30. starting 
Sept. 13. 

Prospective students fot 
fall courses should con- 
firm arrangements 
promptly. A dqx>sit is 
required. Pre-r^stration 
is underway also for win- 
ter classes which begin 
mid-January. The studio 
is clos^ on Sunday and 
Monday, but for hours 
and information, call 
499-85^.at any time. 



Jesse James 
celebrates Sept. 
birthday 

Do you know which 
famous robber always 
carried off the money in a 
grain sack? It was Jesse 
James and his gang! Jesse 
James was a bandit who 
robbed banks and trains in 
Missouri and nearby 
states. He and his family 
favored the South in the 
Civa War. He was bom 
on Septembers. 1847, and 
has become a legendary 
"bad man" in our folk- 
lore. Part of the folklore 
states that Jesse James 
was chivah-ous and the 
legend grew until he be- 
came almost an Ameriam 
equivalent to Robin 
Hood. 

You can read all about 
it at the Virginia Beach 
Public Library. Hop on 
your horse, or whatever 
transportation you use, 
and go to your load 
branch of the Virginia 
Beach Public Library. 



SUREMTE 

You're sure to get a Ute if you 
drop a Dne in the dmsified 
columns of ymir aMimumty 
newspaper. Your classiried ad is 
pan of the hometown newt thai 
everybody wants to read n wen 
M the news (rf the commynity. 



Chorale schedules auditions 



The Virginia Beach 
Chorale (formerly the 
Virginia Beach Civic 
Chorus) will hold audi- 
tions for the coming 1979- 
80 season on Wednesday, 
September 5, and Sunday, 
Sept. 9. 

There are opmings in 
all sections of the chorale; 
soprano, alto, tenor, bari- 
tone and bass. Singers 
with reading ability and 



strong tonal quality may 
audition on Wcdiwiday 
evening. Sept. 5 9X 7:30 
p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 9 
at 3 p.m. Auditcms will 
take i4aoe at Tlialia Trin- 
ity Presbyterian Oiurcli. 
420 ThaUa Road, Virginia 
Beach. An acconpanlst 
win be aviulable. F<m- ftir- 
tho- informati(Hi ctmtact 
Ms. Suidi ThompcM at 
499-1328. 



TS'ISCOOL 



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USED FURNITURE 

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MOSTANYTHIMG 

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4801 Short Drive 



TIDEWATIR'SMOST 

UNUSUAL STORE 

HOURS / Ifra - Ifen. Thni let. 

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Wrapping ftptr - 8o«M 

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Phono: 4844>1S1 



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R)r every d^ee cooler 
than 78?yDur air condi- 
tioner uses about 5% more 
electricity. And in the 
summer, when the most 
electricity is used, that can 
make a big difference. 

So please, set your 
home air conditioner at 78° 
or higher, or no more than 
15°cooler than the tempo*- 
ature outside (whichever 



is the higher setting.) 

You can also take these 
two important energy 
management steps. First, 
restrict your weekday use 
of major appliances during 
the **peak load " horns of 
10 A.M. to 10 P.M. Second, 
dont overwork your water 
heater Use the dishwasher 
and washing madiine 
only for full loads,and wash 
dotl^s in cool water in- 
stead of hot 

By following these 
tJps,yDul be keeping your 
electric WIIs down, and 
helping us all make it 
through the summer with- 
out power sk)rt^es. 



Vepco 



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VIRGINIA BEACH StNG WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER S, I«79 5 



Pre-storm checklist is a good aid during hurricane season 



By JUDITH G.RHOADES 

As this time of year approaches, the vast destruction 
that hurricanes can cause brings real concern to those 
who live in Virginia Beach . 

No matter what levity is placed on names (since 
hurricanes will now also be known by men's names), 
over 80 percent of the 41 million people in the hurricane 
belt have experienced destruction from one of these 
storms. 

The Insurance Company Institute has suggested a 
pre-storm checklist which may help you before a storm 
•rises. Naturally, some of the suggestions will not 
pertain to all situations, but adapt the ones which do, 
because in the event of a particularly bad storm, damage 
can be minimized by precautions taken previously. 

Remain indoors. Travel is especially dangerous when 
winds and tides are whipping through your area. 
Remain at home, if possible. Take no unnecessary risks. 
Stay away from exposed windows and glass doors. If 
your home has an 'inside' room, stay there during the 
height of the storm. 

If you rely on medicines of any kind, make sure that 
an extra supply is on hand. In case of a catastrophe, all 
available drugs and materials will be used for care of the 
injured. 



You 

and your 

money 




Have at least one flashlight in good condition, mth 
extra batteries readily available. Secure all outdoor 
objects that might be blown around. This inclines 
garbage cans, garden tools, toys, signs, porch furniture 
and other seemingly harmless items that can become 
missiles of destruction in a bad storm. Also make 
certain that garage doors, awnings and storm shutters 
are d secured. Roof antennas should be removed or 
lowered. 

Check your transistor radio. This may be your only 
link with the outside world for some time. It will keep 
you advised of the storm's progress. Also it will hdp 
dispel any rumors that might develop. 

Stock a generous supply of drinking wato* in clean 
bathtubs, jugs, bottles and cooking utensils in case there 
is contamination "of your area's water supply. Have 



uonsumer interests 



extra canned goods and non-perishable foods on hand. 
Cars should be fueld since service stations may be 
inoperable for several days. If possible, your vehicle 
should be moved out of the path where flooding may 
occur. 

If you live in a mobile home, check your tie-downs 
and leave for more substantial shelter. If your mobile 
home can be moved, it should be taken to a safe area. 
Damage can be minimized by securing the mobile home 
with heavy cable anchored in coacrete footing. 

Board up your windows or protect them with storm 
shuttffs or tape. Some suggest that a window on the side 
of the building opposite the side from which the wind is 
blowing should be left slightly open. 

Moor your boat securely or more it to • designated 
area. Leave low lying areas that may be swept by high 
tides and waves. If your escape route is over a road 
likely to be covered by water or likely to be congested, 
don't delay evacuation any longer than necessary. 

Remember, great care should be taken if you're going 
outside or cleaning up once the storm has passed. For 
your own^afety and that of your family, here are some 
things to do: 

Beware of loose or dangling power lines . 

Walk or drive carefully, especially along debris-filled 
streets. Siiakes, poisonous insects and washouts of 

Consumer guide for auto 
insurance available free 



roads and bridges are among the dangers you may 
encounter. 

Check for spoilage of any food you might have had 
refrigerated, particularly if the power was shut off for 
more than a few hours. Make sure the drinking water is 
safe before using it. 

If all of Tidewater has been affected by the storm, it 
may take some time to return to normalcy. Be patient 
and coopei|g|f||rith the police and any emergency 
personnc^s^^ 

JadttlflUpK It a free lance writer who has spent 15 
yean V^ aecarities industry. If you have any 
qiwstioBi Kgardiag flnaacc, securities or the stock 
narket you may address them to her in care of thb 
newspaper. Please be certain to enclose a self-addressed 
stamped envelope if you wish a persoMi reply. Allow a 
minimum of six weeks to receive an answer. 



Cut clothing expenses 
by learning tQ sew 



Try comparison shopping for best credit terms 



Today most people Fmd it impossible to live without 
credit ~ the ability to get goods, services or money now, 
on the promise to pay in the future. 

Deciding when, how, and how much credit to use can 
be confusing for many consumers. According to the 
better Business Bureau, comparison shopping for the 
best credit terms and making sure all provisions of 
credit agreements are understood before signing are two 
"musts." 

Credit costs money 

Credit costs money, and consumers who buy on credit 
usually will pay more for a product or service than if 
they pay cash. The added cost for credit buying, the 
finance charge on a credit agreement, is the fee set by 
the seller or lender for the use of products or money. 
The amount financed, the interest rate, and the length 
of time it will take the consumer to pay are major 
factors in how much the credit will cost. 

The cost of credit must be stated clearly in writing 
along with all terms and conditions, and this 
information must be made available to the consuiner 
before a credit or loan agreement is signed. It is up to 

'^tHis iflftHiilUioii and uiutefitaiwfe'lMBiBmwirtSiij "^ 

_1_ commitment. 

It is also the consumer's responsibility to shop for 
credit carefully. By comparing the annual percentage 
rate (the finance charge expressed as a percent) 
consumers can get a good idea of how one lender's or 
seller's credit costs compare with another's. The Truth 
In Lending Act permits easy comparison of percentage 
rates since all lenders must disclose this rate, and it is 
defined by law and based on uniform factors. 
Kinds of credit 

Basically, there are two types of consumer credit: 
installment sales credit and direct loans. "Buy now, pay 
later" agreements are made directly with retailers. Some 
stores offer "no interest" 30-day terms with interest due 
after the first 30 days. Other arrangements require 
payments in installments during which interest is 
charged. Often retailers and credit card companies will 
provide "revolving credit," which involves paying a 
stated amount on the balance each month and paying 
interest on the unpaid balance the consumer owes. 
Stores usually place a "ceiling" on how much money a 
consumer can owe them at any one time. 

When {freeing to a revolving credit arrangement, the 
consumer should know the annual percentage rate, the 
minimum periodic payment required, and the method 
used in determining the balance on which the finance 
charge is to be imposed. (This varies and can have an 
effect on how much the consumer pays.) 

Direct loans Involve borrowing arrangements made 
by the consumer with banks, savings and loan 
associations, finance companies, credit unions, and 
other financial institutions. Frequently direct loans are 
made to finance major purchase or investments, such 



Home buyers school 
planned during Sept. 

Prospective home buyers will have some help 
available with their purchase decisions when the 
Tidewater Home Buyers School meets Thursday, 
September 27 at 7 p.m. 

This will be the last class of the 1979 yaa. 

The course, complete in one night, will be held at the 
Sheraton Inn, Military Orcle, Tenace Room 3. 
Sponsored by the Tidewater Buiklers Association, the 
school will follow a lecture, slide pr«entation and 
question and answer format. 

The slide presentation will feature new homes for sale 
in the Tidewater area. Brochures and handouts will be 
provided during the course of the eveillng. 

Topics to be discussed will include the when and how 
of purchasing a home, qualifications for obtaining a 
k>an, various types of financing and what to look for in 
I sales contract. 

Advance reservations for the school are required since 
seating is limited. For respirations, a brochure or 
further information call the TBA offia. 461-9140. 

IXiie and times for the IWO Home Buyers School 
lesions will be announce in the near future. 



itmL 



as homes, cars, and college tuitli^. Lenders may require 
the borrower to have security for the loan that is some 
type of property to use as a pledge that the loan will be 
repaid. 

When making any purchase, consumers should be 
sure the agreement specifies such items as: 

- the cash price of the merchandise, 

- the down payment or trade in, if any, 

- the amoung to be financed. 

- the annual percentage rate, 

- the number, amount, and due dates of payments and , 
what penalties will result if payments are not made on 
time, 

- whether insurance is required or available, what it 
covers, and what it costs, and- 

- whether there is a penalty if the loan or retail agree- 
ment is paid off in advance of the final due date. 

Wise credit buying also required wise budget 
planning. The Better Business Bureau advises 
consumers to make budget plans based on their 
expenses for an entire year, including a "cushion" for 
emergencies. By means of such budgeting, consumers 
can make credit decisions judiciously, knowing they can 



A new consumer guide 
for automobile insurance 
containing an updated 
rate table for Virginia's 50 
largest cdmpanies has 
been published by the 
State Corporation Com- 
mission. 

A copy may be obtained 
free by writing to the SCC 
Bureau of Insurance, P.O. 
BOX 1157, Richmond, 
Va. 23209. 

Designed to help con- 
sumers get the most insur- 
ance for their money, the 
guide contains an explana- 
tion of auto insurance 
coverages, tips on how 
and when to shop for 
insurance, an explanation 
of how accidents and vio- 
lations affect rates and a 
summary of the constmi- 
er's legal rights in the 
purchase of auto insur- 
ance. 

The guide also contains 



Acid removes efflorescence 



By GENE GARY 

Q. You recently pub- 
lished an answer on how 
to remove white outcrops 
on brick and concrete, 
which I cut out and later 
lost. You mentioned use 
of muriatic acid, but I do 
not remember the mixture 
or details of the applica- 
tion. Woidd you please 
publish this again? — 
Charles E.S. 

A. You apparently refer 
to efflorescence, a term 
generally used to describe 
a white, powdery sub- 
stance sometimes seen on 
masonry wall surfaces. It 
is composed of one or 
more water soluble salts 
originally present in the 
the masonry materials that 
have been brought to the 
surface by water and de- 
posited on the surface by 
evaporation of the water. 

It can frequently be 
removed by water applied 
with a stiff scrubbing 
brush. 

In those cases where this 
procedure does not re- 
move all the efflorescence, 
the surface should be 
scrubbed with a solution 
of muriatic (hydrocloric) 
acid not stronger than one 
part of the commercial 
acid to nine parts of water 
by volume. 

It is important to water 
soak the area to be treated 
before applying the acid 
solution and thoroughly 
rinse with clear water after 
the application. Also be 
extremely careful in using 
the acid, such as w«uing 
rubber gloves and protect- 
ing the eyes with goggles. 

Q. I have paneling of 
tongue and groove red- 
wood boards in my livmg 
room. My problem is this: 
Tlare is now one coot of 
polyurethane on It, y^ich 



Here's 
how 




/ wish to remove to the 
bare wood so that I can 
apply a redwood stain. 
I'm not quite sure how to 
go about this. Can you 
help me? — P.AJ). 

A. There are paint and 
varnish removers that will 
remove a polyurethane 
finish, but in an area the 
size of a room this would 
be a tremendous and diffi- 
cult task. 

I believe your best bet 
would be to sand off the 
present finish with an 
d«xric sander, down to 
the bare wood. Thai 
finish witfi the desired 
stain, just as you would 
finish new wood. 

Q. Could you i^eax /eff 
me how to covm" holes left 
by [Aaster-type screws? 
They were oiiguudly used 
for drapery rods md what 
the rods were taken down, 
it left a few hoks. 

I don't know how tofltt 
the holes or repair the 
damage. That are xvmd 
holes, as ettdt previma 
family mmt have put up 
their own rods. — A*rj. 
John S. 

A. Cracla. holes aid 
dents in pUtMered wab 
can be ^sily tested wUi 
Tuff-glass Fabric aod 
Krack-Kote cement. TVs 
requires no san^ng and Is 
invisible under paint or 
wallpaper. 

This type of r^r Ao 
allows for ccmtraction tad 
expansiM), wUdi prevents 



cracks and holes from 
reopening. The products 
are available at all large 
paint and building supply 
stores. Be sure to follow 



the container 
carefully. 



directions 



Q. As part of remodel- 
ing an older house in 
Virginia Batch, we re- 
moved the wall tile in a 
dark bathroom, r^lacing 
it with light wallpaper. 
However, the tile remains 
inside and around the 
edges of a stall shower, 
ruining the overall effect. 

Do you know some wtfji 
to change the color of the 
tile with some special kind 
of paint or other means? 
We would like to end up 
with light beige or white. 
Thanks for any help you 
may offer. — Barbara 
R.L. 

A. There is an qwxy- 
type product now avjul- 
able for painting ceramic 
tile, available at your 
paint dealers. One thing to 
remember in painting the 
tile is that you also paint 
the grout so there would 
be no contrast between the 
tile and grout. 

The epoxy coatings 
come in two packages. 
After mixing, they are like 
any other joint, acept 
that after about eigitt 
hours the j»int begins to 
thicken and eventually 
bwtMna unusable. 



a statewide average rate 
table that gives an indica- 
tion of whkh companies 
charge rates that are 
generally lower and which 
companies charge rates 
that are generally higher. 
The average rates con- 
tained in the booklet are 
intended to indicate which 
companies have rates that 
are generally higher or 
lower in comparison with 
other companies. They do 
not show what a particular 
individual would pay for 
insurance because rates 
vary in particular cases 
based on the amount of 
insurance purchased, 
where the in(hvidual lives, 
the underwriting emphasis 
of the company, the 
driving record of the in- 
dividual and other perti- 
nent factors. In addition, 
coiApamek' luijust rates 
pniodicall^. 



Do you loVe the latest 
fashions, but have trouble 
affording the expense of 
today's clothing? The 
Virginia Beach 

Department of 

AgricuUure / Cooperative 
Extension Service is 
offering you a chance to 
create a new wardVobe, 
one you can afford by 
sewing the latest fashions 
yourself. 

The Beginning 

Seamstress Course is for 
the adult male or female 
who wants to learn how to 
use a machine and use 
commercial patterns to 
construct their first 
garment. A home 
economist will lecture and 
demonstrate methods for 
the beginning sewer. 
Individual consultation 
will be scheduled. 

The course will be held 
September 12, 19, 26 and 
October 3 at the Birdneck 
Road Annex. There will 
be two classes scheduled, 
one from 9 a.m. - noon 
and an evening class, 7 - 9 
p.m. 

The Tailoring Course 
will include 7 lessons on 



advanced construction in 
shaping a garment to a 
perfect ^fit. A home 
economist will lecture and 
demonstrate methods and 
techniques of tailoring a 
coat or jacket. Individual 
consultation will be 
scheduled. The course will 
be held September 6, 20, 
27, October 4, 11, 18, and 
25. The first meeting will 

Help in fighting 
a losing battle 

Are you fighting the 
battle of the buldge and 
losing? If you are looking 
for a permanent weight 
loss program, consider the 
Diet, Exercise and Beha- 
vior Modification Pro- 
gram being offered by tHe 
Virginia Beach Depart- 
ment of agriculture/ 
Cooperative Extension 
Service beginning Septem- 
ber 17. Two classes are 
being offered. 

A $10 registration fee is 
required but $1 will be 
returned for each pound 
lost, up to 10. Call 427- 
4511 to preregister. 



MAKi Your Bao - Our Bag 

A bag fHled with your household cHscards can help a lot! 
The Disaliled Americans off Tidewater desperately need your 
household discards to raise funds for disabled Veterans. We 
need clothing (men's, women's and children's) small 
applUuices, furniture, dishes, books, toys, rugs, tv.'s, 
Mtchen wares. 



Jutt About ilivfMq^'i/ttM 

Vmv OMMflta It Tai DtAidM* 
FM FUT KKMIMl FICXW 




Let US handle your 
second mortgage . . . 

We'll make you feel 

right at home. 

A second mortgage is a great way to get money fast— when 
its handled correctly 

The people at Instaloan Financial Services understand this, 
so we ail work hard to provide the helpful, informative kind 
of service that really makes a difference You II know it the 
minute you stop by or give us a call When it s time for your 
second mortgage, we can make you feel right at home 

Instaloan ^ 

ifNDl. 

Financial Services, Inc. 

VIRGINIA BEACH OFFICE 
John Sargent. Jr. 3627 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

Branch Mangier Virginia Beach. VA 23452 

C^ New. . . 804/463-0333 -Or Mnl TMs Cmqwii For Mwe Nriormatiaii 



most convenient time to call 



I ■!»• w^^^^ 



'• •w»ltiIH»» «■ ' v'W'iMi-p p iflpw^iM^^^B^P 



■^^'"(Pi^P^«'"^»^W'F^I!HPi^^ppiIW^^P^P«IP^^^^*'^»'PlP!^ 



■^TPIP 



6 VnGINIABEACHSVNDWEDNESDAY,SEPTEMBERS,l»7» 



V\ 




Decor 



Builders are stepping up energy saving in new liomes 






score 



Designers create 
dual-purpose room 



8y BARBARA HAKTUNC 

Q. We live in a very 
small, older home in 
Kempsville which we are 
remodeling a bit. We had 
a small porch at one end 
of the kitchen and we've 
incorporated that space 
into the kitchen. I'd like to 
have a family room and 



A. Tbe dileiniDa you 
■nd your husband are 
concerned with is a com- 
mon <nw and one which is 
frequently discussed in the 
design, home furnishings 
and real estate fields. I've 
heard extremely convinc- 
ing arguments on both 
sides of the issue. 



By LIN J. COOPER 

Today's homes are snugger than their counterparts of 
> just a few years ago. Builders are using more insulation, 
phigging air leaks and switching to energy-efficient hnt 
pum|» in homes whh electric heat. 

That's what 12.000 builders who constructed 140,000 
homes said in response to a recent surv^ conducted by 
the Rnearch Foundation of the National Associatipn of 
Home Btulders. In all. 33.000 builders were aslcfd to 
detail their construction techniques. The results 
nationwide closely parallel what Virginia Beach and 
Chesapeake builders are curr«itly doing. 

The use of initiation increased draoMtiodly afitcr the 
OPEC oil raibargo of 1973-74 put an end to cheap fuel. 
In 1973 .<^ pa-cent of all homes weie buiU with no more 
than R-li insulation in the walls, and 26 percent had R- 
7 or l«s. By 1977 fully half the new houses used R-13 « 
better. ' 

But the greatest change came in roof insulation. In 
1973 tworthu-ds of the roofs were insulated to R-13 or 
less; R-30 insulation was virtually unknown. 

Bv 1977, ff ;iercent of all roofs w^re insulated to a 



'^ 



Notes from the 



/- 




shelter industry ^^ 



value ©f T-19 or nK»e and 28 percent used R-30 or 
better. 

Other enei^y savinp products have made great 
birMds into the construction market as well. Steel 
insulated entrance doors accounted for 44 percent of the 
market in 1977, up from 32 pwant in 1973. 

Windows have always been one of the greatest heat 
losffs In a honw. They can be responsible for more than 
40 percent of the heat loss. Consequently there has been 
a trend toward greater use of double and triple glazing 
of windows. Single pane glazing accounted for 74 
percTOt of aU windows in 1974, but only 43 percoit in 
1977. Storm wbidowsoy^ured a 22 percent share of the 
market both years, but douUc insulating of windows 
mushroomed from four percent in the earlier year to 33 



dining area off the kitchen 
but the 8xJ0-foot space is 
hardly big enough for 
that. My husband and I 
would like a pleasant, 
gardenlike setting and 
plan lots of windows in 
this kitchen extension. Do 
you have any ideas for 
furnishing this room so it 
can function as a dining 
place for the two of us and 
be comfortable for relax- 
ing, too? —R.P. 

A. Planning dual- 
purpose rooms seems to 
have become a way of life 
for many of us, doesn't it? 
Space is so precious and 
costly we have to do with 
much less than we'd like. 
But clever interior design- 
ers prove that space can be 
used in many ways. For 
example, designers Char- 
lotte and Ving Smith 
created a dining spot and 
lounging spot just off a 
kitchen and the results 
were smashing. 

They placed a parch- 
Ibent white Naupbyde 
Viiiyl fabific sofa ' with 
loose-pillow back against 
a cabinet and bar which 
separated the kitchen 
from a small additional 
space for dining. The sofa 
and an additional simi- 
larly upholstered ottoman 
are pulled up to a low 
dining table which easily 
accomodate three place 
settings. At one ^d is a 
small fireplace. Around 
the edge of the room is a 
raised platform in front of 
the windows for potted 
plants. Other pots are 
hung from the ceiling for a 
year-round garden atmos- 
phere. A light fk>Or in 
golden tones was used in 
the room as well as ui the 
adjoining kitchen. 
Emphasis was on easy- 
care fabrics and materials. 
Q. We are a Navy 
family who usually buys a 
house at each move. My 
husband's job necessitates 
moving every four years 
and sometimes in two 
years' time. He feels we 
should put the bare ne- 
cessities into a house, Just 
keeping up the mainte- 
nance and painting the 
walls. New rugs and mqjor 
renovations as well as 
wallpaper are costly mis- 
takes to him. 

I feel making a home 
enjoyable at a modest 
expense is worth the in- 
vestment. I don't expect 
you to take sides but I'd 
like your opinions in this 
area — J.E.M. 



From a purely real 
estate poim of view, re- 
novations, wallpaper and 
carpeting aren't going to 
appreciably ad to the sales 
price of your home. How- 
ever, attractive additions 
to your home will indeed 
make it easier to sell when 
the time comes. And, of 
course, from your point of 
view you'll be enjoying the 
additions while you're 
there and that's certainly 
worth something — 
although exactly how 
much depends on the m- 
dividual. 

My immediate reaction 
is that I'd put most of my 
money into good, well- 
constructed furniture (so 
it can stand up to the 
frequent movuig) that will 
be at hopie in any basic 
shell. After all, much of 
the aesthetics of interior 
design is creating the illu- 
sion. You vrant to create a 
feeling or a mood. And 
so, paintings, prints. ccA- 
lections of persoiud inte- 
rest, fine rugs, mirrors, 

and accent rumjture su^f, 
as small chests, tables, 
cabinets and chairs are 
quite portable and allow 
you to set up home wher- 
ever you go. 

With your travels per- 
haps you can from time to 
time even add a fine piece 
mdigenous or at least 
characteristic of your 
area. However, I feel there 
are so many inexpensive 
decorating ideas available 
today that you can adapt 
many to your own needs. 
Put up an inexpensive 
wallpaper, paint a colorful 
mural on your plain wall 
and repaint it if you think 
it won't help sell your 
house when you leave, use 
staples and laths to cover a 
wall in fabric. Hinge to- 
gether hoUow-core doors 
and cover them with 
fabric to provide room 
dividers or interesting win- 
dow treatment. Check 
magazines designed for 
apartment dwell«-s to cull 
ideas for decorating that 
can go with you. 

I feel for you in your 
desire to create a beautiful 
home if only in one place 
for a short time. Perhaps 
this places on you the 
responsibility of searching 
out creative ideas that 
either are inexpensive or 
portable. You can do it. It 
just requires diligent re- 
search. 

Please send questions 
for Decor Score to tliis 
newspaper. 



iseacii real estate 



percent in 1977. 

Restrictions on natural gas hook-ups and uncertainty 
about future supplies have caused a shift toward electric 
heat. The market for heat pumps has enjoyed a 
tremendous growth spurt in the past few ynrs. 

Only four percent of new homes were hrated with 
heat pumps in 1973. That share grew to II percent in 
1975, 15 percent in 1976 and 20 percnit in 1977 and it's 
still growing. Hmt pumps are particularly popular in 
Tidewatn' where they acomnt for the heating source in 
the n»jority of new homes constructed. 

Rapid changes have also been noted in the sheathing 
market. In 1973 fibreboard accountNl for nK>re than 
half of all sheating. This droiy)ed to 30 percent in 1977. 
Foam insulating boards, on the other hand,*n«u'ly 
tripled their market share in just one year, increasing 
from five p^cent in 1976 to 14 percent in •1977. 
Aluminum foil'faMd sh«ithing grew from two percent 

use to nine percent in that same one-year period. 

Most prospective new home owners can count on 
their new homes being dose to the most energy-efficient 
modan technology and cost effectiveness can provide. 



Bay Area Realty moves 




Bay Area Realty, with 
offices currently at 4968 
Holland Rd., Virginia 
Beach, will soon move to 
new offices due to in- 
CTeased volunme of busi- 
ness and a larger sales 
force. Tbe new offices will 
be located at 5226 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia 
Beach. 

Simon Bdgel will as- 
sume the position of head 
broker and {Mresident of 
the comply. Beigel is 
replacing Glenn Walls 
who is retuing due to 



health reas<Mu. 

Bdgel has been a resi- 
doit of Tidewater sinoe 
1959 and has been actively 
engaged in real estate sinoe 
1975 with sevoral large 
firms in the local area. He 
is experienced in both new 
and resale homes. He has 
heea a partner in Bay Area 
Realty sbice its inception. 



LOCAL TOUCH 

No other medium is bound up 
with the everyday life of your 
community more than your 
hometown newspaper. 



CUSTOM GARAGES 

Bum to your tptmmilom% 

AluiniiiiHii and Vinyl Siding 

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ROOM ADDITIONS 

1800 N. MIUTAIIY HWY., NORFOLK 



FIOE 






Space use from the kitchen is converted into a dbrini and ithudBg spot in a gardai settlag in tiria room created by 
designers Charlotte and Ving Smith. Fabrics and Hoor are H^t colored In Naagaliyde and vinyl for easy care. 



Lighten up your 
decor for summer 



By LESLIE AYERS 

Your apartment, like 
your wardrobe, needs a 
change of pace to reflect 
the bright summer days. 

One way to accomplish 
this is to do something 
with the extra space off a 
living room, bedroom or 
kitchen which you might 
have been using as a 
"catch all." Give the 
room a name such as sun 
room, solarium or plant 
room and turn it into a 
cheerful hideaway. 

This added space can be 
used not only as a retreat, 
but also as expanded space 
for entertaining or 
working. Since this sun 
room is an extension of an 
existing room, keep in 
mind that some continuity 



in color and style should 
be maintained. 

But, don't feel so 
inhibited that you dare to 
make it a little different. 
The room should have 
some individuality, and 
perhaps can be a little 
bolder since you won't be 
spending all your time 
there. 

See DECOR, p. 7 



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VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 5, ir79 7 



Ma„MmiMMM„...——^^.IX :-■ ,t 

Lawn & garden 



You can grow tasty horseradish in your yard 



Time to prepare lawns and gardens for fall 



Fcicm Umu should be 
esubUshed this mmth or 
in early October. When 
buying seed, be sure and 
get Fescue 31 that is 98 
percent pure and recently 
' tested for germination. Do 
not purchase seed mixM of 
Fescue, Rye. and Bhw- 
grass. Tliese usually don't 
do well in this area. 

Fcrtiiliini an estab- 
lished Fescbe lawn should 
begin thii month. Fall uid 
early winter is the best 
time to develop a good 
root system that mables 
fescue to survive July and 
August in Tidewater. Use 
the "Weed and Feed" 
products with cautimi. 
Hie weed killers in these 
products can damage trees 
and shrubs, read the labd 
completely before using. 

Cora ouwonm can be a 
problon in the fall v^e- 
table garden, especially 
tomatoes, snap beans, 
lima beans, «nd sweet 
com. Carbaryl (Sevin) SO 
percoit WP or S percent 
dust is recommended for 
control. 

Spider mitea may also 
be a problem this ttae of 
year on many garden 
crops. Repeat applications 
of carbaryl (Sevfai) may 
rault in a "build-up" of 
mite populations. Treai 
undersides of leaves with 
dicofol (Kelthane) I8.S 
percent EC. 

FaU crops to plant this 
month are lettuce, turnips, 
a^oi^o iets; 



from the vine as fruit 
without a stem does not 
store well. 

Sweet Potatoes should 
be dug prior to the flrst 
ttoti, since the dead vines 
can cause decay to spread 
to the roots. If the skin is 
brokoi on a mature sweet 
potato the surface dries on 
exposure to the air, but 
rraiains moist and turns 
dark if the potato was 
immature. 

Ike dMenace between 
Pillbugs and Sowbugs is 
the former rolls up when 
touched while the latter 
does not. Both, however, 
eat plants. 

Hoi, dry weatiwr is 

condusive to spider mite 
reproduction; Conse- 
qtKntly, early September 
is the dme to be on the 
look oitt for them. They 
usually do not attack aU 
plants, but fifVor certain 
plant families. 




Adult Spider Mite 




wL 



DC narvested mien 
turn a deep, solid color 
and the rind is hard. 
Allow to ripen on the vine. 
Harvest afta vine dries, 
but before heavy frost. 
Cut the stem 2-3 inches 



DECOR 



After mating, females 

b^in laying eggs at a rate 

of from two to six a day 

I lay a 100 orj^pie 

hatch in as few as three 
days. All active sta^ feed 
00 plant tissue and are 
usually found on the 
underside of iMves. Injury 
takes the form of pale or 
ydlowish* leaves. Light 
infeMti<Mi| cause little 
damage and tlwr^ore go 



unnoticed. It is the heavy 
^festations that are 
noticed and also the most 
difficult to control. A. 
chemicals miticide is the 
only proven method of 
eliminating dense popula- 
tions. ' 

One of the important 
factors in chemical control 
is the proper interval bet- 
ween applications. The 
egg to adult life cycle 
spans 23 days at 60 de- 
grees F (15 degrees Q and 
narrows to seven days at 
80 degrees F (27 decrees 
Q. All stages can be 
found at any given time. 
Since chemicals only con- 
trol adults (not eggs), the 
seven day cycle minus 
three days for the egg 
stage gives you only four 
days to eliminate the 
adults before the invuhier- 
able eggs are laid again. 
As you can see, spraying 
once a week would not 
break the «yde and mites 
would continue to survive 
and multiply. 

Therefore, the best con- 
trol of spider mites during 
optimum growing condi- 
tions is to spray three 
times at four day inter- 
vals. Dicofol (Kelthane) is 
the only effective chemical 
for spider mite control 
available to the home- 
owner. Since it is a contact 
poison, the best rnults are 
obtained by sprfiying both 
the top and bottom sur- 
faces of the leaves. 

Un^rstaad yov peats. 

Know their weakness(es) 
and exploit it with soine 
type of control. Inswts 



brought into bloom for 
Thank^ving if you give 
them 14 h<nir ni^ts start- 
ing September 10. The 14 
hours must be (X}ntlnumis 
(not even a one minute 
interruption) and the 
darkness complete. Be 
sure to avoid overcrowd- 
mg and n»er let them dry 
out. 

Rieger Begenlaa to 
bloom for December 
should be started from tip 
cuttings now. Leaf cut- 
tings would devdop too 
slow to make the holidays. 

Avoid fcrtfliiieg trees 
and shrubs now as this 
may produce tender foil- 
age which is easily killed 
by fall frosts; 

Annuals— Pinch off old 
flowers and seed pods and 
lightly fertilize with 5-10-5 
in order to promote a 
flush of flowers before 
autumn frosts. 

Bonsai— An easy 
method for obtaining a 
potential bonsai (minia- 
ture tree) is to use con- 
tainer grown nursery 
stock. Look for a one 

gallon plant with a twisted 
or dwarf-like character. 
Plants with heavy, thick 
trunks, small leaves, and 
large roots that protrude 
above the soil can make 
into-esting forms. Your 
nurseryman may also have 
information on the culture 
and care of bonsai. 



ByPATWCkOEWTOW 

Roast beef isn't roast heef withcHit a touch of 
horsoadish on the side of the plate. But whUe tlw 
prepared stuff we buy in Tidewater supermarkets isn't 
all bad eating, you haven't rnUy lived until you have 
tasted the creamy white condimoit freshly grated from 
your own hom^own roots; 

And at today's prices, a standing rib roast deserves 



If most of the roots dug up are needed for grating or 

rindutg, the pieces selected for replanting can be made 

igo Wher by splitting them lengthwise before setting 

lem B the soil. Better mark the strips in some way so 

you won't go planting them upside down. 




Japanese beetle 



grabs 
this 



Backyard 
gardener 



the best accompaniment you can give it . "* 

Because it mil grow anywhere — even in a Virginia 
Beach lawn if it g^ the chance — horseradish usually 
gets the short end of the stick in *our gardming 
operations. In fact, judging by my mafl, most gardeners 
are more concerned with how to get rid of it rather than 
how to grow it. 

This is a mistake, for when it is left to go its own way, 
it develops rapidly into a weedy mat. invading otho- 
parts of the gardoi, and producting twisted, distorted 
roots which are stringy in texture and bitter in flavor. 

Properly cared for, horseradish will grow stout, 
straight roots which are easy to grate or put through the 
grinder, and its flavor is sweet and palatable, in spite of 
its pungent hnt. 

Annual overhauling should be the rule with 
horseradish, for ifi this way it doesn't escape to become 
a nuisance in other puis of the garden. 

And since the roots are completely winta--hardy, late 
summer or early fall u a very good time to get the job 
done, so the planu have time to g^ themselves nicely 
established and settled down before bad weadier 
arrives. 

Taken up while the soil is a bit on the dry side and 
nicely workable, the rooU come up clean and whole — 
important, because if you leave even as much as one tiny 
bit of root unlifted. it will go on sprouting in all 
directions. 

Once the plants are out of the ground, they can be 
divided into pieces with single crowns. Select the 
vigorous, youngish portions, discarding the old. tough 
veterans. 

If more than one "eye" or growth bud can be seen in 
the top of a jnece to be replanted, dig out the excess 
buds with the point of a pocketknife to encourage the 
productitm of thick, straight sticks. 

Remember, too. th^ you can't produce palatable, 
well-flavored rooU from pow soil, so while the roots 
are out of the fround, jpou'd better §ei ina^few li(d» m 
the bed so fertility will be maintained. 



3 GENERATIONS LOSE 
100 POUNDS EACH 

Credit Conway Diet Institute 





tntmiiW^'mi/ffr 8n 
othera. One r easo n for this 
is that some plant surfaces 
are not comlusive to feed- 
ing and reproducing. 
Unusually thick or hairy 
leaves are oamples. 

Poinsettlas can be 



"W^"U W iba surface 
and feeding on the roots 
of turfgrasses and shrubs. 
Granular diazinon or 
Milky Spore Disease 
Powda are effective con- 
trols. The disease powtter 
is a biological control and 
will have no effect oa any 
otl^ soU insecu. 



i*dndere, Biol'ii n^t'^'nuxed inflmatel^^ with' &e soil 
all tltt way down to the full dq)th of your spade. On no 
account may fresh manure be used, as this produces 
forked and distorted roots — it must be so well rotted 
that it looks almost like earth. 

With the soil so enriched, the bed should be trodden, 
for horseradish detests loose soil. After raking, the 
roots may be planted — right Aid up — voticaUy in the 
soil, spaced 12 indies apart each way, and with two 
inches of soil over the top of the root. 



This mother, grandmother and great grand- 
mother, although unrelated, have each lost 
100 pounds or more while following the Ideal 
1000 Calorie Diet and attending the weekly In- 
sight Seminars conducted by the Conway Diet 
In^itute. 

Mrs. Anna Crum. on the left, is the great- 
grandmother. She lost 107 pounds. Mrs. Bon- 
nie Greenamyer, the young mother in the cen- 
ter, lost lOOV^ pounds. Mrs. Marge Fetters, on 
the right is the grandmother. She's lost 103 
pounds. 

All three of the ladies are thrilled with thehr 
achievements and are delighted to recom- 
mend the Cipnway program to you. 

The Conway weight reduction program con- 
sists (A three main elements: 

• The Ideal 1000 calorie diet that includes 
all food groups and exceeds the established 
nutritional requirement for adults. 

• Wceidy educational seniiiars that deal 
with the physical, nutritional and emotional 
causes of overweight. 

• The Forever Slisn plan for permanently 
maintaining slimness. 

«»ooo«oooooo«oooooooooooooooo 



NEW MEMBERS— SAVE $5.00 

Bring this coupon with you to any meeting hsted 
and you will save $5.00 off the Initial Registration 
Tee pf $6.00 and Weekly Seminar Eee«f $3U)0. 
Pay only $4.00 instead of $9.00. 



from page 6 

When selecting flooring 
for this room, considn 
ceramic, wood, vinyl or a 
painted floor. Choose a 
floor covering that 
coordinates or 

complements the 
adjoining room. 

Individual taste should 
dictate the style of 
fumi^ing selected for this 
room. If the sun room is 
located off a traditional 
room, burnt rattan chairs 
would work well. 

The color variation of 
the rattan makes it fit with 
both dark traditional 
pieces or the more 
contemporary styles. A 
lacquer table or ch^ will 
add color to the overall 
scheme. 

For kn ede^c look, a 
mix of natural oak, 
chrome and glass with 
various texturn would be 
apprapt'me. If you have 
been fascinated with 
ceiling fans, but have 
never had the right iriace 
for them, the sun room is 
juttthepl«:e. 

A combination of 
wicket upheristery pnKt* 
in cri^ sail doth also 
works well in this type of 
room. Add matdi stick 
shadtt at the windows, 
lots of plants and the Am 
moving fan and you ha^ 
oeUMi a great summo- 
room. 

L(K>k arouml at the 
s|MM ym have in yonr 
apartment, do some 
evaluating and sec If 
thov's something more 
you am (to. 



Lawn maintenance classes 
begin soon at libraries 



During S^tembo- and 
Oct<rf>o, Tidewater resi- 
dents will begin getting 
thdr fescue kwns back in 
shape. Vivnia Beadi De- 
partmoit of Agriculture 
horticulturists will be con- 
diKting classes <mi Lawn 
EMd)Iishment and Lawn 



Maintenance at the Vir- 
ginia B«u:h Public Libra- 
ries. 

Person interested in at- 
tending these classes 
should conWA their locfd 
branch library for dates, 
times and to register. 



Dennie elected as banking officer 

Bobbie N. Deniue has Alabama, joiiwd the bank 
been elected a banking 
officer by the Board of 
Directors of First Vh-ginia 
Bank of Tidewater. 

Dennie, a native of 



A FRIEND SAVES $5.S0 

tf you tiring rTrl'end wtth you whlen ybu Join, tlie;i the 
cdiqKMi wiirtie worth $10.00. $5.06 for you and SS.OD for 
your friend. 

O W a r aapfc r — FrMay. gap f fca r M. 1979 



Weekly Insight-Motivation Seminars 



VHMIiaAKACH 
THURSDAYS 

IMMDMbiOr 




CHISAPCAKE 
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iRhwUbraiy 



NORPOLK 
TIICSIMVS,7t30P.M. 

QMS vMb OT NOffoll 

PORTSMOUTH 
THURSMYS.7:30P4R. 



as assistant manager of 
the bank's Rosemont 
Road office. 

Prior to joining Fkst 
Virginia Bank, Dennie 



was with Commercial and 
Induttrial Bank in Mem- 
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ceittly as assistant vice 
president and branch 
manager. 



SSOlRMtSt 

CALL 486-6552 or 423-1803 

Weir Nemfrera Alwafft WrlcoMc 

Registration $6.00 plus Weekly Seminars $3.00 
Diet Matchers, Inc., subsidiary of 

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8 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER S, 1979 




Vimnia Beach 



nonces 



i 



Virginia: In the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach 

Leona R. Payton, 

Complainant, 

vs. 



7401 Joy Drive, Gautier. 
Mississippi, it is ordered 
that Johnnie Earl Siler do 
appear on or before the 
i7th of October, 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 



Shirley O'Neil Payton, Acopy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
and Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 

David Alan Payton, an Hary J. Hicks, p.q. 
infant, 4316-C Virginia Beach 

Blvd. 
and Va. Beach, Va. 

Roger Clark Payton, an 8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 
infant, 



and 

Vicki Lynn Payton, an 
infant, 

and 

Michael O'Neil Payton, 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF HEARING 

The object of this suit is 
for the Complainant to 
establish, by satisfactory 
evidence, that Shirley 
O'Neil Payton, her 
husband, is deceased 
based upon a presumption 
of death arising from the 
fact that Shirley O'Neal 
Payton has been absent 
ifunintemipted years and 
has not been heard from 
since his original 
disappearance on August 
18, 1971. 

Pursuant to Section 

64.1-105 et. seq. of the 

Code of Virginia, order of 

publication has been 

published for four (4) 

successive, iweeks .iix.ihe-. 

ViigiAlal;;i>BfiaicJh;C .Siui.i 

ending on June 20, 1979. 

Therefore, pursuant to 

Section 64.1-108 of the 

Code of Virginia, notice is 

hereby given that on 

October 12, 1979, a day 

more than two weeks after 

this advertisement, a 

hearing will be held in the 

Circuit Court of the City 

of Virginia Beach, at 

which the Court will hear 

evidence concerning the 

Blieged absence of the 

supposed decedent and the 

circumstances and 

duration thereof. 

Leona R. Payton 

By: James B. Lonergan 

Of Counsel 



James B. Lonergan, 

Esquire 

Smith. Dickerson A 

Home 

Holland Plaza Office 

BIdg.. Suite 127 

4176 South Plaza Trail 

Virginia Beach, VA 23452 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 22nd day of August, 
1979. 

Annie R. Siler, Plaintiff, 
against Johnnie Earl Siler, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of one years 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 3rd day of August, 
1979. 

Richie Lee Wilson, 
Plaintiff against C79-697 
Johnny Lewis Wilson, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro from the 
said defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
7713 Coral Vine Lane 
Tampa, Fla. 33619, it is 
ordered that Johnny 
Lewis Wilson do appear — 
on or before the 26th of 
September, ,1979, aiiddo . 
WKat'iftay bfe hedHssi^'tb'^ 
protect his interest in this 
-stiit; 



A copy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 

Ansell and Connor, p.q. 
4336 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Va. Beach, Va. 

8/15,8/22,8/29,9/5 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach. 

HELEN E. KAUFFMAN 

and 

CHARLES R. 

KAUFFMAN, 

Co-Committees for 

Elizabeth L. Dillard, 

Petitioners, 

V. In Chancery No. C-79- 
1375 

ELIZABETH L. 

DILLARD, et al. 

Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to effect the sale of that 
parcel of real property 
known as 1322 W. 49th 
Street, Norfolk, Virginia, 
more ' particularly 
described as: 

Beginning at a point on 
the easterly line of 
Quarantine Road, where it 
is intersected by the 
Northern line of 49th 
Street, then easteriy along 
the northern line of said 
49th Street for 86'. Then 
northerly and at right 
angles of said 49th Street 
to the eastern line of 
Quarantine Road, then 
southerly along the 
eastCTn line of Quarantine 



Road, to the point of 
beginning. 

It being the same property 
conveyed by Helen E. 
Kauffman, feme sole, to 
Elizabeth L. Dillard by 
deed dated April 4, 1979, 
and recorded in the 
Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City 
of Norfolk, Virginia, in 
Deed Book 1487 at page 
19, 

for the purpose of 
discharging the 

outstanding obligations of 
Elizabeth L. Dillard and 
to properly maintain her 
due to her health and 
infirmity. 

It appears from the 
Affidavit of the 
Petitioners duly filed 
herein that the following 
Respondents are not 
residents of the 
Commonwealth of 
Virginia: 

Patricia Isobel Meadows 

Dillard 

1811 Costillo Street 

Santa Barbara, California 

93101 

Lawrence Carroll Dillard 
1811 Costillo Street 
Santa Barbara. California 
93101 

Timothy Andrew Dillard 
1811 Costillo Street 
Santa Barbara, California 
93101 

Robyn A. Dillard 
1811 Costillo Street 
Santa Barbara, California 
93101 

Sydney Frencji Dillard 
Hall 

32S2E.^3!Wft^^8^»'><^ ^"^ "'^'^ 
Orlando, Florida 32806 



Michael Elliot Dillard 

HaU 

5259 Nadine Street 

Orlando, Florida 32802 

Susan Hall 

5259 Nadine Street 

Orlando, Florida 32802 

Elliot Hall 

5259 Nadine Street 

Orlando. Florida 32802 

Erin Hall 

5259 Nadine Street 

Orlando, Florida 32802 

Carolyn Lee Dillard 
General Delivery 
Monticello, South 
Carolina 

It further appears from 
the aforesaid Affidavit 
and the Bill of Complaint 
previously filed herein, 
that there are or may be 
parties interested in the 
subject matter of this suit, 
namely those unknown 
heirs and/or distributees 
of Elizabeth L. EMUard 
who have been made 
parties to this suit under 
the designation of parties 
unknown. 

WHEREFORE, it is 
ordered that the 
Respondents named 
herein appear before this 
Court on or before 
September 28, 1979 and to 
protect their interests as 
may be effected by this 
suit. 

ENTER this 6th day of 
August, 1979. 
John V. Fentress 
Raymorttf W. Bjorkman, 
D.C. 

John W. Drescher, p.q. 

Pickett, Spain & Lyie 

101 N. Lynnhaven Road 

P.O. Box 2127 

Va. Beach, Virginia 23452 

8/15.8/22,8/29,9/5 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 7th 
day of August, 1979. 

In Re: Adoption of 
FRANKLIN ORRIN 
SANTHUFF and Change 
of Name to JEREMIAH 
FRANKLIN WHITE, by 
JAMES R. WHITE and 
GERTHA L. WHITE, 
Husband and Wife. 

Chanciery No. C-79-1476 

To: Burgess Franklin 
Santhuff 
9829 Diana Street 
Riverside, CaUfomia 
92503 

ORDER 

This day, came JAMES 
R. WHITE and GERTHA 
L. WHITE, Husband and 
Wife and Petitioners, and ' 
represented that the Object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named child. 
Affidavit having been 
made and filed that 
BURGESS FRANKLIN 
SANTHUFF. a natural 
parent of said child, is a 
non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 9829 Diana Street. 
Riverside, California. 

It is therefore 
ORDERED that the said 
BURGESS FRANKLIN 
SANTHUFF appear 
before this Court on or 
before the September 27, 
1979, and indicate his 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption^ or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
mtutti tKHUs^iifatii^.:' ' •' '. .-^ 
It is farther Ordered 
that this Order be 
published once a week for 
four successive weeks in 
the VIRGINIA BEACH 
SUN, a newspaper 
published in the City of 
VIRGINIA BEACH. 
VIRGINIA. 

A Copy Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Qerk 

J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

I ask for this: 

Stuart R. Gordon 

BERG AND GORDON. 

P.C. 

2953 Virginia Beach 

Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virgitiia 

23452 

8/15.8/22,8/29,9/5 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
24th day of August, 1979. 

In re: Adoptira of Keasha 
Arlentheia Daniels 

In Chancery IC-79-1625 

By: James Russdl WaUce 
and Michelle Walke, 
Petitionen 

To: Edward Keith Ta^or 
375 Greenleaf Drive 
Norfolk, Va. 

ORDER 

This day came James 
Russell Walke and 
Michelle Walke, 
Petitioners, and 
rqiroented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the Mioption of the 
above named infant, 
Keasha Arletheia Dviiels, 
by James Russdl Walke 
and Michalle Walke. 
husband and wife, and 
affidavit having been 



made and flied that 
Edward Kdth Taylor, a 
naitural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia and 
that due diligence has been 
used by «r in behalf of the 
said Petitioners to 
ascertain in which County 
or cwporation the said 
natural parent is, without 
effect, the last known post 
office address being: 375 
Greenleaf Drive, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Edward Keith 
Taylor »ppeu before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
neoenafy to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

Acopy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

J. Curtis l^t. D.C. 

Marc Jacobson, p.q. 
6663 Stoney Point South 
Norfolk, Va. 23502 

8/29.9/5,9/12,9/19 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON 
THE 14TH DAY OF 
AUGUST, 1979. 

In re:'Adopfltm of Jam«r 

jiunaiti viRCimni, tit ma 
Jennifer LyneGreenhiir 

In Chancery #C-79^1489 

By: Ronald Phillip Reed 
and Laura Dunn Greenhill 
Reed Petition's 



To: James Ronald 
Greenhill, jr. 
330 Village Drive 
Virginia Beach. Va. 



ORDER 

This day came Ronald 
Phillip Reed and Laura 
Dunn Greenhill Reed. 
Petitioners. and 
rqiresented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant(s). 
James Ronald Greenhill, 
III and Jennifer Lyne 
Greenhill, by Ronald 
Phillip Reed and Laura 
Dunn Greenhill Reed, 
husband and wife, and 
affidavit having been 
nude and filed that James 
Ronald Greenhill, Jr.. a 
natural parent of said 
child(ren). is a non- 
resident of the State of 
\%ginia, the last known 
post office addres being: 
330 Village Drive, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 

It is theref(M'e Ordered 
that the said James 
Ronald Greenhill, Jr. 
appear before this Court 
within tn (1(0 days after 
publication of this Order 
and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to 
privet his interest in this 
matter. 

A cq?y teste: 

Rexford R. Cherryman, 
4606 Westgrove Court 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23455 

8/22,1/29,9/5,9/12 



In the Qerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 21st day of August, 
1979. 

Ray Edward Bragg, 
Plaintiff, against Lynn 
Esther Bragg, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii (a 
divorce from the bond of 
matrimony) from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of separation 
lasting for a period of 
more than one year under 
the provisions of Section 
20-91(9) of the Code of 
Virginia (1950) as 
amended. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
150 Valeside N.W. 
Massillon. Ohio 44646, it 
is ordered that Lynn 
Esther Bragg do appear on 
or before the 11th of 
October, 1979, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy-Teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
Deputy Clerk 

Theodore A. Boyce, p.q. 
P.O. Box 2193 . 
Va. Beach. Va. 23452 



Dq)uty Clerk ^ 

Tom C. Smith, p.q. 
2604 Pacific Avoiue 
Va. Beach. Va.. 23451 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office Of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
22nd day of August, 1979. 

In re: Adoption of Victor 
Manuel Gonzalez 
Herrera, Minor Boy 

In Chancery #C-79-1622 

By: Jose Arturo Gonzalez 
& Ana Echenique 
Gonzalez, Petitioners 

To: Ana Rosa Herrera 
CallellNo. 1342 
Bogota, Colombia 

ORDER 

This day came Jose 
Arturo Gonzalez and Ana 
Jane^ Echenique 
Gonzalez. Petitioners, and 
and represented that the 
object of this proceeding 
is to effect the adoption of 
the above named 
infant(s). Victor Manuel 
Gonzalez Herrera, by Jose 
Arturo Gonzalez and ^a 
Janet Echenique 
Gonzalez, husband and 
wife, and affidavit having 
been made and fil«l that 
Ana Rosa Herrera, a 
natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of 
the Sute of Virginia, the 
last known p<»t office 
address bdng: Calle 11 
No. 1342, Bogota, 
Colombia. 

It is therefore Ordo-ed 
that the said Ana R(»a 
Herrera &pp^>t before this 
Court within toi (10) days 
after publication of this 
(^der and indicate her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
ne^ssary to protect his 
inter^t in this nutter. 

At^s^teMe: 

Jdu V. Fentress, Oerk 

R^mond W. By^tmtn, 



Vir^nia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
22nd day of August, 1979. 

In re: Adoption of 
Danielle Sassone and 
change of name to 
Danielle Barth 

In Chancery #C-79-1328 

By: Gary R. Barth and 
^Cynthia H. Barth, 
Petitioners. 

To: Daniel A. Sassoon 
71 Illinois Street 
Rochesto", New York 
14609 

ORDER 

This day came Gary R. 
Barth and Cynthia H. 
Barth, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant 
Danielle Sassone, and 
change of name to 
Danielle Barth, by Gary 
R. Barth and Cynthia H. 
Barth, husband wife, and 
affidavit having been 
made and filed that Daniel 
A. Sassoon, a natural 
paroit of said child, is a 
non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 71 Illhiois'Safeet-, / 

14609. 

It is therefore Ord^ed 
that the said Daniel A. 
Sassoon appear before 
this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of 
this Order and indicate his 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matf. 

A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
Deputy Clerk 

Richard J. Tavss, p.q. 
P.O. Box 3747 
Norfolk, Va. 23514 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 7th day of August, 
1979. 

Jill S. Mitcham, Pliuntiff 
against C79-1478 
Frederick Mitcham, 
Defoidant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object ctf this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro, to be later 
merged into a divom a 
vinculo matrimonii at the 
expiration of one year's 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
beoi made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
^dent of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
p(»t office «ldress bdng 
658 South Fifth Street, 
Frukfort, iMlMna 46041, 
it is (vc^ed that Ihvdaick 
Mitdiam do appMr (» or 
Nfore the 27th of 
^rtonbCT. 19^, and do 
vhtA amy be aecenary to 
pnHect his intenst in this 



suit. 

Acopy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Oerk 

Raymond W. Bjorkman. 

D.C. 

Stuart R. Gordon, p^. 

P.O. Box 2257 

Va. Beach, Va. 23402 

8/15,8/22,8/29.9/5 



In the Qerk's Office of 
Uie Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach. 
on the 10th day of Aug- 
ust, 1979. 

Lori Lynne Albright, 
Plaintiff, against David 
Monroe Albright. Defen- 
dant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this sidt is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defoiduit. upon 
the grounds of one year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that^^ 
•the defendant is not a 
resident of the state of 
Virginia, the hut known 
post office address being 
11226 East 25th Street. 
Indq^endence, Missouri 
64050, it is ordered that 
David Monroe Albright 
do appear on or before 
the 2nd of October. 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

(irlo ,M oiTB '>i.'M ntiA 

2604 Pacific Avenue 
Viigiiiia 'Beadh. 
23451 

8/15. 8/22. 8/29, 9/5 




In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
aty of Virginia Beach. 
on the 10th day of Aug- 
ust, 1979. 

Oady Ann Udra Luther. 
Plaintiff, against Mark 
Allen Luthv, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of Oils niit 
is to obtain a divmee a 
vbiculo mafrhnooii Iron 
the said defodant, iq^on 
the grounds of one year 
sepanuion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filad that 
the defaidaat is not a 
Ksident of the Stitte of 
Viifiiua. the last known 
post office addrvtt being 
Fox Divjsran. Uss Ani«- 
ica (CV66) FPO NBW 
YORK, NEW YORK, 
09501, it is ofdend that 
Mark Alten Luther do 
appear on or b^ore the 
2nd of October, isn, 
UMl do tAM m^ be 
necessary to protect hit 
interest in tbta suh. 

A oq^-Teste: 

Tom C. Smhh, p.q. 
2604 Pacific Avenue 
Viiginia Beach. ViitWa 
23451 

8/15, im, l/». ft^l 



m 



www tt s^mm w m -i- »- m^m mtm 



i^^^^PV^^>^"«IV 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMM» S. H1» 



Virginia Beacii PUblk Notices cont'd. 



V^njaii: In Um Oerk's 
Offloe of the Juvoiite and 
Donestic Relations 
I^strlct Court of the City 
of V^oia Beach, on the 
27th day of Ati|ust, 1979. 



Cdmmonwealth 
Virginia 



of 



In re: Michad Paul Meier 
MicbeUenmnMeier 

ORDER OF 
PUBUCATKW 

The object of this 
proceedint is the 
totstoation of the residual 
pineal ri^tt of Patricia 
Ann Mder and Paul John 
M^ to Uidr children, 
Michael Paul Meier A 
Michdte nuun Meia. The 
consequencies of 
terinlnatlon of residual 
piraital rlghu are that a 
parent or paroits forever 
relinquish 411 parental 
rights such as. but not 
limited xo, the rights to 
companioiuhip, associa- 
tion, religious training, 
education, discipline, 
guidance, maintenance 
and all decirion making 
concerning the children's 
welfare. And further it is 
to «)mmit said infants to 
the care and custody of 
thi Virginia Beach 
Department of Social 
Services with the right of 
said agoi^ to consent to 
the infants' adoption. 

And an affidavit having 
bedi made and filed that 
Palrida Ann Mder and 
Paul John Meier is a 
proper party to this 
proceeding: but due 
<ttligence has been used to 
asdnlain in what county 
w corporatim he or she 
isTWittidut effect, it is 
ORI^RED tint Patricia 
Ann Mewr and Paul John 
Mdenra^l^^ttr^M^ 
within 10 days after ihie 
pubUcati<»i hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her/his interest in 
this suit. 

ACopyTe^: 
Elizabeth E. Henley. 
Clerk 
iCathyS.&othav.D.C. 

Carolyn Tucker, Va. 
Beach Dept. 

Petitioner of Social 
Services 

JiivenUe & Domestic 
Relations District Court 
Munkipal Cotter 
Va. Beach. Va. 23456 

9/5,9/12.9/19,9/26 



A a>py-Teste: 

John V. Fentms. Clerk 

Linda Noel HiU.D.C. 

Doumar. Pincus, Kni^t 

and Harhm, p.q. 

1350 Virginia National 

BankBldg. 

Norfolk, Va. 

9/5,9/12,9/19.9/26 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
on the 9th ^y of Aug- 
ust. 1979. 

David J. Fazen^, Plain- 
tiff, againA Pamela Faz- 
entUn, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

lite object of this suit 
is to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro, to be 
later maged into a div- 
orce a vinculo miArimonii 
at the expiration of om 
years sepan^on from the 
said defe»iant, upon the 
grounds of deserticm. 

And an affidavit having 
been nude and filed that 
the defemlaitf is not a 
resklent of the state of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
Cleveland, Ohio, it is 
ordered that Pamda Faz- 
endin dOs4>pear on or 
before thi 1st of Oct- 
obo", 1979. and do what 
may be necessary to pro- 
tect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy-Teste: 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
aty of Vlr^nia Bei^, w 
the 27th day of AuguM, 
1^79: 

Horace J. Savage, 
Plaiiitiff, against Kay 
UndaSavi^, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Hie d)^ of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce frmn 
t^ boi^ of matrimony 
frcAri the said driendant, 
upon ti^e grounds of 
nmtinucNU sq[»nKion in 
cKessormieyear. 

And an a^tevit having 
been nMdc and filed that 
the tlefendant is ncM a 
raridat of tte State of 
Vir^iia, «he last known 
poM ofHef tddtss oeb^ , 
2i6MiriMAve^.Carinle, 
^iMylvaite 1*^13, it is 
ortwid tint fay Lin^ 
Sa^«p 49^ iW«v OB <M 
before the 25th of 
Ocx^er. 19M, and do 
wM B^ b« nece^ry to 
pmmA her inftBiW h this 
nit. 



at public auction, for 
cash, reserving unto itself 
the right to bid, the fol- 
lowutg motor vehicle: 

1972 Toyou Mark II 
Serialno.RT63Q24618 

Banna Buick Inc. 
DMV 7317 



8/22.8/29.9/5 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Ciroiit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the ISth day of August, 
1979. 

Susan Lynn Crovetti, 
Plaintiff, against C79- 
1559 Joseph Anthony 
Crovetti. Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of one year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Joseph 
Anthony Crovetti the 
above-nuned defendants 
last known post office 
address is 1751 Cowrie 
Avenue, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, and that due dili- 
gence has been used by 
and on behalf of the 
plaintiff to ascertain ut 
what county or corpora- 
tion the defendant is, 
without effect, it is order- 
ed that Joseph Anthony 
Crovetti do appear on or 
before the 5th of October. 
1979. and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virgink Beach, on 
the 17th diQT of August, 
1979. 

Ethel M.Harris. Plaintiff, 
against James P. 
McGeein, Principal 
Defendant and Fidelity 
American Bank Co., 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to attwAi ml and personal 
property of the prifldpal 
defendant, James P. 
McGeein, and to subject 
same in satisfaction of 
debts due and owing by 
the s«id James P. 
McGedn to the plaintiff. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last Post 
Office address being 4316- 
C Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, it is 
ordered that James P. 
McGedn do appear here 
within ten (10) days aftar^ 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Gerk 

Mildred A. Wergand. 

D.C. 

James W. Brazier Jr.. p.q. 

Levine A Friedman 

160 Newtown Road. Suite 

416 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 

8/22,8/29,9/5,9/12 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



Virginia: 



"K copy-Tette:' 



John V. Fentress, Clerk 



Stuart R. Gordon 

P.p,,Bo]^X^7. : :.,n!'"5 « ^ „, „. . 

vU-^^i. iu»r.v. v{,«&.{«- Raymond W. Bjorkman. 

2^52 "^^^^^^ DepuiyCleA 



8/15. 8/22, 8/29, 9/5 



In the Cleric's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
O^ of Vuvnia Beach, 
on die 9th day of Aug- 
ust, 1979. 

Jao(^ H. Fedrow. Plain- 
tiff, against Janet K. 
Fedrow, Defendant. 

C»tDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit 
is to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro from the 
said defetdant iq>on the 
grounds of deserticm. 

And an affidavit havii^ 
beat made and filed that 
the defendant is mM a 
residoit of the StiUe of 
Virginia, the last known 
port office address bdng 
c/o Michael Corum, 
Rural Route #4, Box 52, 
Kankakee, Illinois 60901. 
it is ordered that Jaiwt K. 
Fedrow do a^Mar on or 
befoK the 1st of Oct- 
ober. 19^, and do what 
may be neMssary to jho- 
tect ha interact in this 
suit. 

A coj^-TMte: 

James O. ftoocotetti 

Suite 101 

533 Newtovm R(wd 

Virgbito BmA, Viifhda 

2346 

8/15, 8/22, 8/29. 9/5 



Forest A. Nesto; p.qV 

Tidewater Legal Aid 

Society 

3432 Va. Beach Blvd. 

Va. Beach, Va. 23452 

8/22,8/29,9/5,9/12 



In dw Cterk's Office of 
die Qrcdt Court of the 
Gty of Virginia Beach, on 
the 16th day of August, 
1979. 

Robert P. Hobson, 
Plaintiff, against C79- 
1562 Angd M. Hobson, 
Defeiulant. 

ORIffiROF 
PUBLICATION 

'necd^i^aissukis 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrim<ntii frmn 
the said defi^ant, upcm 
the grrands of the pvtiei 
having lived Mparate and 
apart without 

cohaUtstion and without 
intcmiptira for a poiod 
in excess of <Nie year. 

And ut affidavit having 
been matte and filed that 
the defoidant is n(» a 
reddent of the state of 
Virginia, the \M known 
pmt (^fk* addr^ bdng 
1 1 Burke Street, 
Pasadena, Texas, it is 
orders that Angd M. 
Holmm (to wpfCK on or 
before tlw fth of Ocadbet, 
1979, ai^ do whitt may be 
neces^iy to proteA ha 
inloeM tat tMs suit. 

A ccq^T^e: 
J(AnV.FditreM,Clak 
- lUynMHiu v.. bjorkman, 

D^ratyOcrk 

Stiwrt R, Gordon. p.q. 
Take notice that on Sep- /utMMy 
toiber 12. 1979 at 10:(X) P.O. ^ix 2257 
a.m. on the front steps of Va. B^ch, Va. 23452 
Banner Biwk Inc. lUO 
Laskin Road Virginia 8/22,8/29,9/5.9/12 
Bei^. Virginia 23454. 
Baa^ Bukk Inc. will seU 



Vlrgfaiia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the dircuit 

I'hhdi^of Aupm. 1979. 

In re: Adoption of Minor 
Child Named Robert 
Henry Mason 

In Chancery »C-79-1574 

By: R(^)ert Paul Horwath 
A Beverley Kaye Daniels 
Mason Horwath, 
Petitlonen 

To: Gary Kenney Mason 
General Delivery 

Elizabethtown, 
Koitucky 

ORDER 

This day came Rdbert 
Paul Horwath and 
Beverley Kaye Daniels 
Mason Horwath, 
Petitioners. and 
repres^^ that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
^fect the adoption of the ' 
above named infant, 
Robot Hairy Mascm, by 
Robert Paul Horwath and 
Beverley Kaye Daniels 
Mascm Horwath. hustend 
and wife, and affidavit* 
having been made and 
fited that Gary Koiney 
Muon, a natural parent 
of said diild. is a non- 
resident of the State of 
ViriginUt, the last known 
post office atklres bctog: 
General Delivery, 
Eliabethtown, Kentucky. 

It is therefrare Ordered 
th« tlw said^Ckry Koiney "^ 
Mason appear before this 
Cmirt within ten (10) days 
afta publication (^ this 
Orda and indicate his 
attitude ^ toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
iMceuary to prcnea his 
i^oot in this matter. 
A eo|^ teste: 
John V. Fffitress, aerk 
J.CurteFi«it,iy,C. 

T<mC. Smith, p.q. 
H04 PadFK AveniM 
Vh^i^ Beach; ta. 2345 1 

8/22,«/»»f/S.9/12 



The regular meeting of the Council of Virginia Beach 
will be held in the Council Chambers of the 
Administration Building, City Hall, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday September 
17, 1979 at 1:00 p.m., at which time the following 
applications will be heard: 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

1. 

Subdivision Variance: Appeal from E>ecisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to certain elements of 
the Subdivision Ordinance, Subdivision for Thomas R. 
Terry, Property located 200 feet North of the 
intersection of Bray Road and Ingram Road. Plats with 
more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIHCA- 
TION: 

VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 



An Ordinance upon Application of The Big Four, a 
Virginia General Partnership, for a Change of Zoning 
District Classiflcation from R-7 Residential District to 
A-2 Apartment District on certain property located at 
the Southwest intersection of Norfolk Avenue and 
Rudee Avenue, running a distance of 400 feet along the 
South side of Norfolk Avenue, running a distance of 
290 feet along the Western property line, running a 
distance of 326. 14 feet along the Southern property luie, 
running a distance of 90.1 feet in a Northeriy direction, 
running a distance of 128.07 feet in an Easteriy direction 
and running a distance of 170 feet along the West side of 
Rudee Avenue. Said parcel contains 2.5 acres more or 
less. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: ^ 



An Ordinance upon Application of Lynn Huffingham 
for a Conditional Use Permit for dune disturbing 
activity on certain property located on the East side of 
Mortons Road beginning at a point 1 14 feet more or less 
North of Ocean View Avenue, running a distance of 140 
feet along the East side of Mortons Road, running a 
distance of 62.30 feet along the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 140 feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a distance of 30 feet along the 
Southern property line. Said parcel contains .148 acre. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 



IOC ' ^ ».,*»» 



An OrdiiBaiMAittiKm A pri i OTt ion of SeawaU^^prisfSrt 
lae.t for a GondMoaal Use Permit for dune disturbing 
activity on certain property located on the South side of 
Ocean View Avenue l>egiiuiing at a point 430 feet East 
of Beaufort Avenue, running a distanct of SO feet along 
the South side of Ocean View Avenue, funning a 
distance of 100 feet along the Eastern property line, 
runnuig a distance of 50 feet along the Southern 
property line and running a distance of 100 feet along 
the Western property line. Said pared contains 5.000 
square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

AMENDMENT: 



Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach to amend and reordain Article 4, Section 
401 of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to use regulations for community centere in the AG-1 
Agricuhural District. More detailed information is 
available in the Department of Planning. 



Resolution of the Council of the City of Virginia Beach 
to amend and reordain Article 2, Section 234 of the 
Comprehensive Zonmg Ordinance pertaining to riding 
academies, horses and hire or boarding. More detailed 
information is available in the Dqwrtment of Planning. 



Resolution of the Council of the City of Virginia Beach 
to amend and reordain Article 11, Section 1113 of the 
Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
housing requirements in the PD-H Planned 
Development-Housing District. More detailed 
information is available in the Department of Planning. 

8. 

Motion of the Planning Comminion of the City of 
Virginia Beach to amend and reordain Article 1, Section 
105 of the Comprdiensive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to nonconforming uses. More detail«l information is 
available in the Department of Planning. 

Plau with more detailed information are available in the 
Departmoit of Planning. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 
City Clerk 

8/29,9/5 



1. Seawheels, Inc. by Cathy Sharp. Tominal Mana^, 
requests a variance of 3 feet in foioe hd^t to a 7 foot 
fence instead of a 4 foot fence as allowed in a required 
setback from a street (Diamond Springs Road) and to 
allow a wire woven fence to enclose a parking area 
adjacent to a street where prohibited on Parcel XLIV. 
Airport Industrial Park, 1357 Diamond Springs Road. 
Bay side Borough. 

2. Vincent E. Lesh requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a buildug 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building 
adjacent to a public street on Lot 8. Block D. Site 2. 
Part 3A, Levd Green, 6049 CXtax Springs Road. 
Kempsville Borough. 

3. Fred Worthington requets a variance of 7 feet to a 
"O" setback for a free-standing sign instead! o' "^ ^'^ ** 
required on Part of Lots 4 and 5, and Raih-oadlUght of 
Way, Plat of Virginia Beach Devdopment Co.. 2413 
Padfic Avenue. Virginia Beach Borou^. 

4. Lloyd and Kay Palmer Weaver request a variance to 
allow parking of major recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 12. Block G, 
Section 1, Stratford Chase, 5217 Foxboro Luding. 
Kempsville Borough. 

5. William K. and Mabel M. Bell request a variance to 
allow parking of major recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 55, Section 2, 
Bayville Farms Area, 4605 Deico Road. Bayside 
Borough. 

6. John B. and Theresa C. Nelson request a variance of 
18 feet 6 inches to a 1 foot 6 inch side yard setback (east 
side) instead of 20 feet as required (accesscMy building) 
on Lot 5, Section 1. Wishart Cove, 1117 Bailey Wick 
Drive. Bayside Borough. 

7. Robert M. and Mary Anne Fanney request a variance 
of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback instead of 8 feet as 
required (west side) on Lots 8 and 10, Mock 20, Section 
E, cape Henry Syndicate, 207 64th Street. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

8. Providence Development Associates by Hem7 A. 
Shook, General Partner, requests a variance of 20 feet 
to a IS foot setback from Lord Dunsmore Drive instead 
of 35 feet as required of a Parcel containing 4.755 acres, 
being located at the southeastern intersection of 
Providence Road and Lord Dunsmore Drive. 
Providence Square Shopping Center Area. Kempsville 
Borough. 

9. Richard L. Matthews requests a variance of 3/eet to a 
2 foot side yard setback instead of 5 feet as required and 

"ofSTiMUo a S foot rear yard setback instnd.of 10 feet 
as required (accessory building •> garage) on Lot 3, Block. 
10,Se(Kion )1, friiu^sAnne Ptaoa, 3041>4;:oacb'Housc 
Lane. Princess Anne Borough. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Berch Board of Zoning Awjods will 
conduct a Public Hearing on WedneKlay. Septonbo 
19, 1979, at 7:30 P.M. in the Coundl Oiambas, 
Administration Buikiing, Munkifwl Center, Virginia 
Boich, ViliinM. Hie f(dlo«ing abdications will vp^as 
ontheag^da. ' 

REGULAR AGENDA: 



10. Cox Cable of Tidewater requests a variance of 141 
feet to a 9 foot setback for a 150 foot high antenna 
instead of a distance equivalent to the hdght (150 feet) 
of the structure as required on Lot 10. Block 2. 
Beechwood, Philips Avenue. Lynnhaven Borough. 

1 1 . Paul H . Buckner requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 
foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required 
(deck) on Lot 1, Block 52, Section C. Ocean Park. 3937 
Shady Oaks Drive. Bayside Borough. 

12. Bobby Gibson requests a variance to dlow parking 
of major recreational ^uipment in front of a building 
instoid of behind the nearest portion of a building 
adjacent to a public street on Lot 1 . Block 1 1 . Section B^ 
2, Part 3, Green Run, 3621 Harbinga Road. Princess 
Anne Borough. 

13. Polynesian Pools. Inc. by Jack Slawson requests a 
variance of 5 parking spaces to 9 parking spaces instead 
of 14 parking spaces as required on Sites G and Q, Phit 
Entitled Property of Davis Brothers Corporation near 
Pine Tree Inn, Lynnhaven Area, 2980 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. Lynnhaven Borough. 

14. Jack Jacobson requests a variance of 25.52 feet to a 
4.48 foot setback instead of 30 feO as required for any 
yard adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean, (dngle family 
residence with oceanfront deck) on the ScMithem 40 feet ' 
of Lot 2, and the Northern 40 feet of Lot 3, Block 13. 
Section D, Cape Henry, 8106 Oceanfront. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

15. Robert C. and Jane K. McCldlan request a vwiance 
of 5 feet to a IS foot front yard setback uistead of 20 
feet as required on Lots 40 and 41, Shore Realty 
Corporation, 1^9 7Sth Street. Lynnhavoi Borough. 

16. Lena Ray Godfrey requests a variance of 4 feet to a 
26 foot front yard setteck instead of 30 feet as requved 
(deck) on Lot 13, Block 30, Section B, Sandbrklge 
Beach, 2833 Sandfiddler Road. Princen Anne Boro^. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. Princess Anne Plumbing and Electricd SuppUers, 
Inc. by Frank W. Kdlam requests a variance of 5 fea to 
a "O" side yard setback instead of 5 feet oi^ as 
required and of 10 feet to a "O" sitte yard sedMidci 
(Baltic Avenue and the east property line) iiMead of 10 
each as required and to ext^md a nonconftniiig 
building where prohibited and of 14 parking q»oes to 
"O" parking spa(^ instead of 14 imtUi^ 
required on Lots 18 and 19, Block 24. Vtagi^ 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. Virginia BMdi Bwoi^. 



2. Stqriicn H. Fox t/a Crazy Shirts recpMAi a 
of 32 square feet of si^ altowMce to 64 aqawe tttet^t 
sign aioi instad of 32 sqiwe feet (MT ^ utm m 
aUowed and of 4 feet to a 3 foot sedMck 4te AvMi- 
stamling sl«n insteul of 7 feo as reqiured oa L4tt 1, 2 






mmi^mi^mti^mmtmmmmmffmmm^Kmm^^mmrmif^t^mfmmmmm 



wmmmmmm^mmmmmmmmm^mmm 



^mmM 



10 VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBERS, 1979 



Vii^inia Beach Public Notices cont*d. 



and 3. Block 79, Virginia Beach,«3306 Atlantic Avenue. 

Virginia Beach Bwough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 

BOARD. 

W.L. Towers 

Secretary 

8/29,9/5 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Planning Commission will hold a 
Public Hearing on Tuesday. September 11, 1979. at 
12:00 Noon in the Council Chambers of the 
Administration Building, Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach. Virginia. PLANNING COMMISSION 
ACTION IS NOT A FINAL DETERMINATION OF 
THE APPLICATION. BUT ONLY A 
RECOMMENDATION TO THE CITY COUNCIL AS 
THE VIEWPOINT OF THE PLANNING 
COMMISSION. FINAL DETERMINATION OF THE 
APPLICATION IS TO BE MADE BY CITY 
COUNCIL AT A LATER DATE. AFTER PUBLIC 
NOTICE IN A NEWSPAPER HAVING GENERAL 
CIRCULATION WITHIN THE CITY. The following 
applications will appear on the agenda: 

DEFERRED BY PLANNING COMMISSION FOR 90 
DAYS ON JUNE 12, 1979: __^ 

1. 

Application of Ernest L. Matthews, Jr., for the 
discontinuance, closure and abandonment of a portion 
of North Birdneck Circle beginning at the Southern 
boundary of Americus Avenue, running a distance of 
190 feet more or less along the Western property line, 
running a distance of 170 feet more or less along the 
Eastern property line and running a distance of 70 feet 
more or less along the Northern property line. Plats 
with more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED BY PLANNING COMMISSION FOR 60 
DAYS ON JULY 10, 1979: 

2. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Sandbridge Road 
Enterprises, a Partnership, for a CoBdItional Use 
Permit for a golf course on certain property located on 
the East side of Atwoodtown Road beginning at a point 
750 feet East of the intersection with Lotus Drive, 
running a distance of 629.05 feet along the East side of 
Atwoodtown Road, running a distance of ISO feet in an 
Easterly direction, running a distance of 1220 feet in a 
Northerly direction, running a distance of 390 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction, rt(|M>«»,» d»j*n«e ^.^feetin 
a Southerly direction, running a distance of 510 feet in 
an Easterly direction, running a distaiice of 700 feet in a 
Southerly direction, running a distance of 1 10 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 100 feet in a 
Southerly direction, running a distance of 100 feet in an 
Easterly direction, running a distance of 900 feet along 
the West side of Sandbridge Road, running a distance of 
1480 feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a 
distance of 500 feet in a Southwesterly direction, 
running a distance of 220 feet in a Northwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 130 feet in a 
Northeasterly direction, running a distance of 400 feet 
in a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 440 
feet in a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 
120 feet in a Westerly direction and running a distance 
of 150 feet in a Northwesterly direction. Said paracel 
contains 240 acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 



An Ordinance upon Application of Sandbridge Road 
Enterprises, a Partnership, for a Conditional Use 
Permit to construct 120 duplexes on certain property 
located on the East side of Atwoodtown Road 
beginning at a point 750 feet East of the intersection 
with Lotus Drive, running a distance of 629.05 feet 
along the East side of Atwoodtown Road, running a 
distance of 150 feet in an Easterly direction, running a 
distance of 1220 feet in a Northerly direction, running a 
distance of 390 feet in a Southeasterly direction, 
running a distance of 30 feet in a Southerly direction, 
running a distance of 510 feet in an Easterly direction, 
running a distance of 700 feet in a Southerly direction, 
running a distance of 110 feet in a Westerly direction, 
running a distance of 450 feet in a Southerly direction, 
running a distance of 980 feet in an Easterly direction, 
running a distance of 170 feet in a Southerly direction, 
running a distance of 100 feet in a Westerly direction, 
running a distance of 100 feet in a Southerly direction, 
running a distance of 100 feet in an Easterly direction, 
running a distance of 900 feet along the West side of 
Sandbridge Road, running a distance of 1480 feet in a 
Northw^terly direction, running a distance of 500 feet 
in a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 220 
feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 
130 feet in a Northeasterly direction, running a distance 
of 400 feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a 
distanc* of 440 feet in a Southwesterly direction, 
running a distance of 120 feet in a Westerly direction 
and running a distance of 150 feet in a Northwesterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 240 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 



■ Poor- Will Point. Plats with more detailed information 
iare available in the Department of Planning. 

"5. 

Subdivision Variance: Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to certain elements of 
the Subdivision Ordinance, Subdivision for Robert M. 
Epstein. Property located at the Southwest intersection 
of 60th available in the Department of Planning. 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSfflCAIION: 

6. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Lake Edward 
North, Inc., for a Cliange of Zoning District 
Classiriaitlon from B-2 Community-Business District to 
A-2 Apartment District on certain property located on 
the North side of Hampshire Lane beginning at a point 
310 feet West of Shurney Lane, running a distance of 
130 feet along the Western property line, running a 
distance of 165 feet along the Northern property line 
and running a distance of 130 feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel contains .53 acre. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

7. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Lake Edward 
North. Inc.. for a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from A-2 Apartment District to B-2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
located on the South side of Hampshire Lane beginning 
at a point 591.61 feet East of Baker Road, running a 
distance of 1239.13 feet along the South side of 
Hampshire Lane, running a distance of 170.33 feet in an 
Easterly direction, running a distance of 222 feet in a 
Northerly direction, running a distance of 196.35 feet in 
an Easterly direction, running a distance of 170.07 feet 
in a Northerly direction, running a distance of 325 feet 
in an Easterly direction, running a distance of 100 feet 
along the West side of Shurney Lane, running a distance 
of 2?^ feet in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 
475 leet in a Southerly direction, running a distance of 
1381.67 feet along the West side of Newtown Road, 
running a distance of 250 feet in a Northwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 70 feet in a Northerly 
direction and running a distance of 250 feet in a 
Ndrthwesterly direction. Said parcel contains 13.3 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

8. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Virginia De Castro, 
Manuelito O. Calayo and Ma. Aurora V. Calayo for a 
Change of Zoning District Classlficatfon from 1-2 
Heavy Industrial District to B-2 Community-Business 
District on certain property located at the Northwest 
intersection of Northampton Boulevard and Burton 
Station Road, running a distance of 44.01 feet along the 
West side of Northampton Boulevard, running distance 
of 278.40 feet in a Northwesterly directioii, running a 
distance of 75 feet in a Northeasterly direction, running 
a distance of 416.30^fcer1ir a Northvfrestefly direction, 
running a distance of 233.57 feet in a Southwesterly 
direction, running a distance of ^536:44 f^t in a 
Southeasterly direction, and runlii^g' ;i"di^ance of 
203.41 feet along the North side of Burton Station 
Road. Said parcel contains 4.168 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 



An Ordinance upon Application of Thomas S. and 
Margaret K. Moore for a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from 0-1 Office District to B-2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
located on the North side of South Lynnhaven Road 
beginning at a point 100 feet more or less West of 
Lynnhaven Parkway, running a distance of 156 feet 
along the North side of South Lynnhaven Road, 
running a distance of 120 feet along the Western 
property line, running a distance of 159.5 feet along the 
Northern property line and running a distance of 120 
feet along the Eastern property line. Said parcel 
contains .417 acre. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

10. 

An Ordinance upon Application of R.G. Moore for a 
Change of Zoniiig District Classiflcation from R-5 
Residential District to A-1 Apartment District on 
certain property located on the South side of Moores 
Pond Road beginning at a point 1565 feet East of Baker 
Road, running a distance of 1190 feet along the South 
side of Moores Pond Road, running a distance of 
355.60 feet along the Eastern property line, running a 
distance of 1290.88 feet along the Southern property 
line and running distance of 262.62 feet along the 
Western property line. Said parcel contains 10.154 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 



11. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Stafford Properties, 
Inc., for a Change of Zoning District Clasdflcation 
from R-8 Residential District to A-2 Apartment District 
on certain property located on the East side of Pleasure 
House Road beginning at a point 285 feet South of 
North Greenweli Road, running a distance of 20 feet 
along the East side of Pleasure House Road, running a 
distance of 300 feet more or less along the Southern 
property line, running a distance of 150 feet more or less 
along the Eastern property line, running a distance of 80 
feet more or less along the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 135 fMt in a Southerly direction 
and running a distance of 200 feet more or less in a 
Westerly direction. Said parcel contains 1.005 acre. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 



SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 



Subdivision Viriaace: Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in r^ard to certain elements of 
the Subdivision Ordinance, Subdivision for Evelyn M 
Vaughan. Property Ioait»I on the West side of 
Lynnwood Drive, 100 feet more or ku North of Whip- 



12. 

An Ordinance upon AppHcation of Virginia National 
Bank for a Change of Zoning District Classification 
from R-5 Residential District to 1-1 Light Industrial 
District on certain property locatni on the East side of 
Hampton Ro«l banning at a point 6^5.80 feet South 
of Siell R<Md, running a distance of 512 feet along the 
East sicte of Hodgman Road, running a distance oi 
735.88 feet along the Southern iM't^rty line, running a 
distance of 555.^ feet along the Eaitem property line 
and running a distance of 536.57 feet along the 



Northern property line. Said parcel contains 7.434 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

13. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Margaret W. 
English for a Change of Zonii« Dtotrlct Chuiiflcatlon 
from R-9 Residential District to A-3 i^^NUtment l^strict 
on certain property located on the East side of Sea Pines 
Road beginning at a point 125 feet West of Pacific 
Avenue, running a distance of 125 feet along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 220 feet 
more or less along the East side of Sn Pines Road and 
running a distance of 180 feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel contains .30 acre. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

14. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Herman C. and 
Francis L. Jehoich for a Change of Zonli^ Dtotrict 
Classiflcation from AG-1 Agricultural District to B-2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
located on the West side of Oceana Boulevard bqinning 
at a point 780 feet more or less North of Prosperity 
Road, running a distance of 212 feet along the West si<te 
of Oceana Boulevard, running a distance of 201.68 feet 
along the Northern property line, running a distance of 
212 feet along the Western property line and rtmning a 
distance of 201 .68 feet along the Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 1 acre. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

15. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Maurice and Israel 

Steingold for a Change of Zoning Disttkt aaaaUkation 

from A-1 Apartment District to A-3 Apartment District 
on certain parcels located on the North side of 24th 
Street. 

Parcel 1: Located at the Northwest intersection of 24th 
Street and Barberton Drive, running a distance of 125 
feet along the North side of 24th Street, running a 
distance of 250 feet along the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 125 feet along the South side of 
25th Street and running a distance of 250 feet along the 
East side of Barberton Drive. 

Parcel 2: Located on the North side of 24th Street 
beginning at a point 125 feet West of Barberton Drive, 
running a distance of 280 feet along the North side of 
24th Street, running a distance of 125 feet along the 
Western property line, running a distance of 280 feet 
along the Northern property line and running a distance 
of 1 25 feet along the Eastern property line. 



contain 1.52 acres. LYNNHAVEN * 



Said parcels 
BOROUGH. 

16. 

An Ordinance upon Application of L^e G. and Eunice 

M. Wermers fot a Change of Zoning Dlstilct 

Classiflcation from R-5 Residential District to O-l 

Office District on certain property located at the 



Northeast int^^tion of South Lynnhaven Road Md^.^ 



Drive. Said parcel c(»)Uins 5.236 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

21. 

An Ordimnce upon Application of Archie G. and EUa 
C. Silverhome for a CondltiOBal Uw Pcmlt fw a h<mie 
occupation (beauty parlor) on certain pr<q}erty lontcd 
at the Southwest intersecticm of Land of Promise RomI 
and Blackwater Road, running a distance of 290.46 feet 
along the South,side of Land of Promise Road, running 
a distance of 208.5 feet along the Western property tine, 
running a distance of 310.3 feet along the S<Hittieni 
propmy line and running a distance of 208.88 feA 

along the West side of Blackwater Road. Said pared 
contains 1 .43 acres. BLACKWATER BOROUGH. 

22. 

An Ordinance upon Application of James M. ft Kvan 
M. Amhold and Httbcn B. and Deborah T. Davis for a 
ConAtloMl Use Pcniyt for dune disturbing activity on 
certain ptoptTty located on the North side of Ocean 
View Avenue beginning at' a point 290 feet West of 
McMtons Road, running a distance of 23 fe^ akmg tha 
N(Mth side of Ocean View Avenue, running a distaiic* 
of 100 feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance 
of 23 feet in a Westerly direction, running a distracc of 
130 feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance of 
30 feet along the N<Htheni property line and running a 
distance of 230 feet ali^ the Eastern property Une. 
Said parcel contains .23 acre. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

STREET CLOSURE: 

23. 

An Application of Gary L. Nelson for the 
discontinuance, closure and abandonment of a portion 
of Ovdfield Avenue beginning at the Southern 
boundary of Alabama Road and extending in • 
Southorly direction a distance of 300 feet to th« 
Northern boundary of Holland Road.V^d parod 
contains .34 acre more or less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

24. 

Application of Donald E. Washburn for thf 
discontinuance, dosure and abandonment of a portkni 
of C Street beginning at a point 370 feet West of 
Barberton Ehive, running a distaiice of 188.34 feet 
along the Southern propoty line, running a distance of 
30.07 feet along the Weston property line, running a 
distance of 183.73 feet along the Northnn property line, 
and running a distance of 30 feet dong the Eutem 
property line. Said parcel contains .213 acre. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

23. 

Application of the City of Virginia Beach for the 
discontinuance, closure and abandonment of a portion 
of 30th Street beginning at a point 43 feet East of 
Atlantrc Avenlie and running in a&Wmut^Wmxm a, 
distance of 103 feet. Said parcel is 60 feet in width am) 
contains .lf(4acre. VIRQINU^EACH BOROUGH. 



I 



Pritchard Roaa, running a distance of 146. 18 feet akmg' 
the North side of South Lynnhaven Road, runninf^i — 
distance of 292 feet along the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 144 feet along the Northern 
property line and running a distance of 238 feet along 
the East side of Prichard Road. Said parcel contains .9 
acre. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

17. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Chesapeake Fence & 
Awning Co., Inc. for a Change of Zoning INstrkt 
Classiflcation from B-2 Community-Business District to 
I- 1 Light Industrial District on certain property located 
at the Northwest intersection of Indian River Road and 
Reon Drive, running a distance of 226.67 feet along the 
North side of Indian River Road, running a distance of 
221.62 feet along the Western property line, nmning a 
distance of 35 1 .48 feet along the Northern property line, 
and running a distance of 386.44 feet along the West 
side of Reon Drive. Said parcel contains 2 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

18. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Chesapeake Fence A 
Awning Co., Inc., for a Conditioni|l Use Permit for a 
bulk storage yard on certain property located at the 
Northwest intersection of Indian River Road and Reon 
Drive, running a distance of 226.67 feet along the North 
side of Indian River Road, running a distance of 221 .62 
feet along the Western property line, running a distance 
of 331.48 feet along the Northern property line and 
running a distance of 386.44 feet along the West side of 
Reon Drive. Said parcel contains 2 acres. 
KHVIPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

19. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Lorraine P. 
Godfrey and John A. Johnson Company, Inc.. for a 
Conditional Use Permit for retail sales of garden 
supplies, equipment, and material, as a subsidiary use to 
a plant nursery on certain property located On the South 
side of Landstown Road beginning at a point 733 feet 
East of Princess Anne Road, running distance of 201.82 
feet along the South side of Landstown Road, runnii^ a 
distance of 533.3 ita. along the Eastern pxopetiy line 
and running a distance of 497 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel contains 1.3 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 



f 



AMENDMENT: 



26. 

Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach to amoid and reordaln Article 2. Section 
229 of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to home occupations. More detailed information is 
available in the Department of Planning. 

27. 

Motion of the PUnning Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach to amoid and reordain Article 9. Sedon 
911 and 921 of the Comfvehensive Zoning Ordinuce 
pertaining to use regulations for automobile repair 
esublishmoits. More detailed information is available 
in the Departmoit of banning. 



Plats with more 
applications are 
Planning. 



detailed infonnation on the above 
available in the Department of 



All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Robert J. Scott 
Director of Planning 

8/29,9/3 



20. 

An O'dinance upon AppDottion of Rock Church for a 
Coi^ttonil Use I^rarit for npansion of an ^ucation 
building on certain property located at the Southeast 
corne- of Kempsville Rcwd and Manor Drive, running a 
distance of 450 fMt aiong the East side of Konps^lk 
Road, running a dtstanc^ of 440 feet along the ftorth 
side of Milburne Dri^, running a distamx of 480 fe« 
along the West side of Rudyard Lane and running a 
distance of 470 feet aioi^ the Sowh side of Mancv 



In the aerk'i Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beadi, <m 
the 28th day of August, 
1979. 

Carl Ernest Mason. 
Plaintiff, gainst Anna 
Elizabeth Mason. 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF: 
PUBLICATION 

The object of tUs suit Is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrinitmii fhm 
the said (tef»dant. i4)cmi 
the pounds of more than 
one year's sqMn^ra. 

And an affidavit having 
bmi made and filed that 
the Ctefmdant is a iwn- 
resktait of the state of 
V^nia. the Vm known 
pm oflke lithas bdi«: 
766 Md^ Wm^ Kftutua, 
New Jowy 01031, it is 
ordered that Anna 
Elizabeth Mason do 



wpjpeu on or befm-e the 
19th of October, 1W9, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
intere^inthissuU. 

Acopy-Teste: 

John V. I^mtieu, Ctok 

J. Curtis ftult, D.C. 

R(^>ertH. Bennett, p.q. 
3330 I^fk Avenue 
Vlr^nia BMdi. Virgbiia 

9/3,9/12.9/19,9/16 



PUBLIC HEARINO 

Nc^e is tod>y given 
that the yiif^sU Beach 
aorGouacB wU hear, fw 
xvotxakksaOam, m Mn. 
day, SqiUntMr 17, Iflf , 
at 2^ p.a.. In the Oam> 
dl Ghanriias, AdB^i6». 
tion Buidng. Virion 
Bach, Vif|^a: 



^r^^^mjm^i M p^w»"»^p^i^i 



f 



OmCCT LMC PNONC 4««.3430 TO AO- VISOR 




>— ' • 



advertlsiiifl 

THKWAnrs MOST imcmE mmm ccmtp in mmi 



S-AtrtwMbHMf«rSal« 



S-A rtw i rt l l ttfwSatt 



^ 



2-SpMialN«ticts 



J 



2-SpwMltotlGM 



2.$pMialllolicM 



WANTED: your 

household extras - 
clothing, furniture and 
junk - by Friend* School 
Thrift Store. All 
doofttions are tax 
dectactibte. Prompt, free 
lockup. Call 428-7841. 

2TF 

miAP UP THIS 
^MNIER in this ^rgeotts 
RED SQUIRREL coati! 
Handmade • one of a 
kind!! EXQUISITE-size 
34. Excellent price. 497- 
4207. 

fCDB 9/12/79 
2 

MAKIANA FURRIER 
AND TALORING SHOP 

- Now is the time to have 
that fur rejuvinated for 
cold wetftherl! Special 
prices all the time! I 
ALTERATIONS ALSO!! 
Work guarenteedt 853- 
3904 

4 CDB 9/12/79 
2 



How To Be A 
Better Driver 

Do you have what it 
takes to drive safely? 

It's control that makes 
the difference. If you know 
your car and know how to 
keep in control, it can help 
you to get where you want 
to Ko safely. 



BOOKKEEPING SER- 
VICES AVAILABLE. 

Notary fw state at large, 
small businesses a 
specialty, financial 
statements, general tedger, 
fed. and state, 
unemployment taxes, 
payroll, ucounts {myable 
and receiveable, bank 
ttatemoiu. 483-1041. 
2 4TCDB9/19 

KXTRACA8H 

Jl't Id aasy. . .advmiae the 
tUniiyouno looter need in the 
dasdfied catuinm of your 
homeioiMi netnpirer. In 
practically no time M aU, people 
in yow M^barhood wtt know 
what you have to i^. You're on 
the road to extra cash. . . 
somebody wiH read your ad and 
buy! 

TENNIS LESSONS FOR 
BEGINNERS. Learn 
fundamentals and enjoy 
toinis in a short time. 
Taught by college 
instructor. $8.00 an hour 
for individual or S6.00 an 
hour for 2 or more. 547- 
0741. 

4T CDB 9/12/79 
2 



-raBBOii-T»raasoN- 

tkM'* Vtl -Tm nS Ta« 
LOCAL Mmwfft 



ROTO-TUXING Fall 
Spedid. 2Sfi off for gar- 
den orjiew lawn, any size, 
uea. 482-2779 

2 4CBD9-3 

NON-COMISSK>NED 
dFFICIKS ASSOC, is 

seeking counselors for the 
TidewatCT area. CaU Mr. 
Bamett at 499-6819. Re- 
tired military preferred. 
2 CDB-TF 

ACTUTEWYERS 

The man orwoman who reads 
their community newspaper 
from oover-io-oover each isiile is 
not only i well-inrormed person 
on local events, but liis or her 
knowMie throufh this reading 
haMt makes them become the 
most astute buyen in this 
community. 

EXTRA CASH 



It's so easy... advertise the 
things you no longer need 
in the classified columns 
of your hometown news- 
papcT. In practically no 
time at aU, people in 
your neighborhood will 
know what you have to 
seU. 



K%>VA-'78, 2 dr., bucket 

seat, 903. V-8, AM-FM, 

air, powa brakes A staer- 

iag, good Mleaie, S3395, 

340-59^. 

6 lCU>9-5 

DATnm-'74 610 wa^w, 
air, excdkm ronditlon, 
S^OO. 467-4446 
6 CBD9-3 



THUNDQmRD, 1965 
Convertibte. Motor re- 
cently overhauled, looks 
awi mas greM, good gas 
mileage. 3«)-976l 
6 1CBD9-5 

PAaai-1979, 4 qxed, 

AM-FM cassette' with 

radio, assiuae loan, with 

no down payiacat, gcd^ 

overseas, must sdl. 425- 

8681 

6 1CDB9-5 

DODGE-'74 Dart Sport, 6 
cyl.. auttMnatic, AM-FM. 
power steering, good mpg. 
$1693. 461-7717 
6 1CDB9-3 

'77 H(HU4£T Sportabout 
Wagon. 6 cylinder, 30,000 
miles, exodleitt condition, 
new inspection sticker, air 
cond., 13100. 46(HM38 
6 1TCBD9-5 

1974 MAZDA pick-up 
with shell. New paint, 
clutch, brakes and tires. 
Perfect shape. Call 486- 
6252. 

4H9/13 
6 



TftANS AM 1978 ^ 

Sp^al Edition, T-top, 
power steering, power 
brakil, power windows, 
AM/TM, CB, electric 
antenna, cruise control, 
A/C. Mint condition. 424- 
2172. 
4T CDB 9/5/79 

47 CDB 9/5/79 
6 



7-Tnieiu-Trail«rs-Jaaps 



•-AatoNrts,Ra|Mfr 






WHYWALKfT? When 
you can ride a MO-PEDI 
SNARK-1979 - 150 mpg. 
Like newl $325. 481-1470 
9 4CDB9-26 




Sail driving maant staying 
^=4» coMrel of your ear. 



Driven who understand 
their bars tend to be safer 
driveisn tThalMNcana knaw>- 
ing what their cars will do 
and knowing how to keep 
them in control under dif- 
ferent conditions, wet road 
or dry road, normal driving 
situation or emergency. 



CHILD CARE - My 

home in Great Bridge area 
Monday-Friday, part time 
full time, your child would 
receive best of care and 
attention. Please call 547- 
7264. 

4T CDB 9/5/79 
2 

SKI TRIP TO 

SWITZERLAND. 7 

nights at the Hotel 
Crystal, St. MoriU. Jan. 
4-11 ^5 Thonuu Stent 
"420M094:"WO!'M" TSnrS^* 
Inc. 

4T CDB 9/5/1'!^ 




. stodc 
in^ynerica. 



I* puWC Hnic* 01 HM puMCMM 
Md TM MnHMiiig CouMil. 




b.o^bEoJi pvsf.ifny. 




lJ .joii lo ncii; 




ts^a^jui^ 



\&mtmmtsisi 



We cannot afford to do less than the best. We will print your 
school paper, religious or professional publications or 
newsletters. 

The POST and SUN have a skilled staff of printers, artists 
and graphic technicians to produce quality publications. 

Our presses and typesetting equipment are of the highest 
quality and our dedication for excellence in reproduction is a 
tradition, lor further information and quotes please call 
547-4571. 



Dennis Foreman 

It Vn. EXP. M CaOAKMI 



nDCLITVMNLOEilf 

coMffinAfMinw 

CWIMCfORS 
S47-7M2 
547-7288 



GEOINICTOWN 
COUWY 

HOME STTES FOR SALE 
FOR 

People ptanaiag Homms 
A CMSion BaUders 

KALI-SOFFICK 
933ProvidcMeRd. 

CAU 464-9317 



AUTORECYCLERS 
NOW BUYING 

MQmsT tmem paidfor 



CmSAPIAKI 
t ALVAM CORP. 



MM steal Mnet 



4t7-6«i0 



HANDY 

CLASSIFIED 

CLIPPER 




S o m eMUin you iwed, or want to ooN? A POST or SIM 
d a a a W a d ad la «io fcwt mmg to r— ch Bio woat p aapl a In tlio 
n«ien, and at hNToat coal. Jmt dip, m out aM mal IMa hmdy 



for 20 words bi each issue 
Of 4iM ChM^Maks POST 
■ndVlrgMiBMChSUN. 



4 weeks only 9 V*' 

iHw tourth woali la FltCE) 
ClaasMcatioii: 



What's Up Doc? 



4rt fou opiiifag • Mw 
practk* er dm^tg M^rttoM? T^e 
out M atf to Me P»T/mm md w*U 
get tlw Nwrtf out te $M yew pa^nU 
mSmmj^ ewMi swiie eetv mm. 




CAU.S474S71 



Y4MIIINAME: 
ADDRESS: _ 



D 



I |Payei«ii* 



Mail tot Sw^l^M 

»A Mm liSf 
CllM«po«ko, ¥«• i33M 



l3-HolpWairta4 



14-PMitiMKWa«ta4 



27 



4t4al-af-T«mfar|Mt 



rORD- 1978 F-100. with 
cap, S4900, 460-1733. 
7 ia)B9-5 

CMC-ltn, fully ciuto- 
mized, fully equipped, 
15^)60 miles, S5500, must 
we, caU 497-5132. 
7 ICBD9-5 



KEYSTONE ELEC- 
TRONIC ENGINE 
ANALYZER $300. 
HANDY Clean parts 
ClOTier S200. Please call 
499-4915 or 461-6640. 
8 4CDB9/18 

WE WILL BUY used and 
junk au^pmobiles. Call 
340-6902 anytime. 
8 TFCBD 



Ad\erti!iiin}« 

SaIeK 
Commnaii^ 

NcwspaperVj 

• 

We're growing, come 
grow with us! Newspaper 
advertising experiences 
helpful bui not necessary 
if you have a background 
in business or marketing 
- career potential Full 
Time position » salary -- 
commission - expenses 
or combination. Open- 
ings in Chesapeake or 
Virginia Beach -- write or 
call in person (no phone 
calls please) Donald R. 
Frye, Gen. Mgr. Byerly 
Publications. Publishers 
of the Virginia Beach Sun 
& the Chesapeake Post 
P.O. Box 1327 Chesa- 
peake, Va, 23320 

13/tf 

AVON NO 

EXPERIENCE NECES- 
SARY You can be 
successful selling Avon 
even if you've never sold 
before. Earn good money 
selling quality products 
that are fully guaranteed. 
Flexible hours, too. Call 
547-8235. 

4T CDB 9/5/79 
13 » 

SALES HOLIDAY 
MAGIC C0SMET1CS- 

OppOTtunity to advance 

to management. Liberal 

commission, car helpful, 

tidewater area. Call 467- 

4040. No investment 

required. 

13 CDB-TF 

REPORTERS - General 
assignments, features, 
news editing with weekly 
newspapers in Southside 
and Tidewater Virginia. 
Prefer journalism sdiool 
background and some 
experience. Must have 
good tyiring ability and 
be willing to learn news 
photography. If you are 
mterested in more details, 
write David Woodruff, 
Byerly Publications, 1000 
Anao^ Drive, Fnu)klin. 

:,vau;?84^, . ;;. ' 



WVENTY-FIVE (75) yr. 
old nationwide sides or- 
ganization has an opoiing 
for 2 reprcscntativa in 
Chesapeake, Great 
Bridge, and Deep Creek 
area. No experioice ne- 
cessary, guaranteed salary 
while traiiung. Excellem 
trtining program, hospi- 
talization, disability and 
retirement benefits. Desire 
individuals who truly 
wants to better them- 
selves. Your greatest re- 
commendations are hon- 
esty and eagerness to suc- 
ceed. For appointmoit 
caU Bill Mapes, 547-7123. 
14 1CDB9-5 



EARLY AMERICAN 
DINETTE SET ~ Maple! 

Table A. 4 chairs. $95. 
Black swivel rocker, green 
occasional .chair, S25. 
each. Or Best offer. 421- 
2660. 

4 CDB 9/5/79 
27 



fOLVE MONEY WOHBES 

How' to help Mive Money 
worries! Lei clMrified adi im 
your homeiown oewip^icr tell 
thinfi you no lon|cr.need and 
aw do without. Low coM wd 
quick •ctiaf! 



COTTAGE FOR RENT 

Sleeps 7, A/C. 
Completely furnished. 
Located oa Currituck 
Sound (Church's Island) 
Perfect for vacation, 
hunting and even fishing 
from back porch!! $100 a 
week. 487-6256 or 919- 
453-2383. 

4T CDB 9/5/79 
49 



7i-S«vkM0rfar«4 






PAKT-TIME Toys, gifu, 
party demcmstrators, free 
samfde Uts, no invest- 
ment, collecting or de- 
livering. 547-5367 
15 2CBD9-12 

FLEA MARKET for sale 
-Owners Finance! Lo- 
cated at 2642 Campostella 
Road, Chesi4)eake: Please 
caU 545-^44 o; 545-9071 
15 4CDB9-26 

INVESTORS WANTED 

for I^sco Dance Studio 
and Private After Hours 
Qub. For full information 
mail letter to 5337 
Talmyra Ct. Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 23462 
15 4 CDB 9/18 



PARIS STREET FLEA 
MARKET-Open Thurs.- 
Sun. 10-6. Come on in and 
browse 'round! 8 different 
shops. 3450 Azalea 
Garden Rd. g57-0477, 

'''"■ 28/tf 



2t>Waataitali9 



WANTED ORIENTAL 
CARPETS-I^ew or Old- 
Any conditjiedi, any age!!! 
461-3834 29/TF 



"W MJukai Wirr hanilii 



21-PrivatehntnKti«« 



CHURCHLAND COUN- 
TRY DAY SCHOOL ~ 

Now enrolling pre-school 
through 3rd grade. Full 
day child care 6 a.m. to 6 
p.m. Hot lunch, 
gymnastics and foreign 
language 484-8783 

4 CDB 9/5/79 
21 



UPRIGHT PIANO - 

beautiful mahongany 
finish. $350. Very ^>od 
condition. 464-3417 
30 4TH9/18 

ORGAN - 3 manual Conn 
organ, model 650 with 2 
sets of gold pipes! A-1 
condition!! $6000. 486- 
0082. 

4 CDB 9/12/79 
30 






22-0m4Msaa(i 
otaar Ptti 



NORVIEW- Rare cofats - 
Norfolk's most complete. 
Buy, sell, trade, ^ying 
silver cdns. 42 Southern 
Slopping Center, Nor- 
f(rik, 853-81 1». 
31 CBD-TF 



13 



PUPS 627-2446. 2 w^s 
old, $150 registered. 



H-TF 



HELP WANTED 
PORTER - Must have 
experience in operating 
floor care machines. 
Excellent opportunity. 
Call executive 

housekeeper, 547-9111. 
EEOC 
13 4TCBD9/18 



PART TIME, Secretary, 
South Norfolk. Good 
typing skills, telephone 
Mrs. Higgins 547-5101. 

4T CDB 9/5/79 
13 

WORK AT HOME IN 
SPARE TIME doing 
telephone survey work. 
No experience necessary. 
Students and housewives 
welcome. Call now collect 
for Mrs. Brasher at (205) 
592-0183. 

5T CDB 9/19/79 
13 

$MS.N GUARANTEED 
FOR $ HOUR WCMIK 
WEEK at home. Ladies 
answer to flnancial 
security. For information 
write Jackson- J40 3107 
Azalea Garden Rd. 
Norfolk, VA 23513. 

8TPDB 10/10/79 
13 

HELPWANTEDt Part- 
time, 64 hrs. a week. 
Establish and service 
jewdry showcases in local 
area. $25 a week guaru- 
teed. Mr. Hamilton, 420- 
2756. 
13 2CBD9-12 



ONE MALE and female 
miniature poodle, 7 
weeks, $75 each. 587-2185 
22 1CBD9-12 



SURBHTE 

You're nwe to act ■ bite if you 

nempaper. Your daitifiad ad it 
part Of the hoawiown news that 
e v e rybo d y wants to read as well 
as the news of the community. 



BRAKES Complete brake 

job $59.95, front disc 

$29.95. Call 547-8529 

aftCT6p.m. 

71 4T CDB 9/19 

AUTO CRUSHQIS-A-1 - 

junk car removing. All 
cars towed away free, top 
dollar paid!!! Fast 
Service. 487-9222 71 /IF 

LIGHT HAULING - 

Gardening, hedge trim- 
ming, lawn mowing, reas- 
onable prices — call for 
estimate! 464-3634. 
71 CBD-TF 

SUKEHTE 

You're sure lo lei a bite if you 
drop a line in the classified 
columns of your community 
newipa p ar. Your dassified ad is 
pan of the hometown news that 
evierybody wants to read as well 
as the news of the community. 

SIMMONS HEATING A 
AIR CONDITIONING. 

CaU the EXreRIENCED 
ONE for repairs or repla- 
cement. We stand behind 
our. 31 years of experi- 
ence. 424-2911. 
71 CBD-TF 

TOT PRICE PAID FOR 

junk cars - also late 

modd salvage... Call 545- 

3517. 

71 CBD-TF 



CAVALIER KFTCHENS 

offers Overton unflnished 

cabinets. High quality, 

low prices. We offer 

plannii^ and installation, 

or do It yourself! 857- 

1435. 

71 CBD-TF 



BRITTANY SPANIELS . 

AKC roistered; sire, dual 
diampion, flekl trials & 
show dog. Call Spencer 
HOI, 499-1421. 
22 1CBD9-5 

REG18TEXED 2 yr. old 

^valoosa fiUy. (703) 743- 

4176. 

22 1CB09-5 

COCK A TIELS 8 week 
Normals $35. Albianos 
$75. Male Splits $50. 
Hand fed Noemals $50. 
Please cdl 488-6446. 
22 4 CDB 9/21 

FREE!! Puppy to good 
home; moving. Call after 
5 p.m. 547-2465. 
22 4TH9/19 



ALL TYPES, NEW AND 

used restaurant and bar 
equipment. Dixie 
Equipment Company. 
1008 Granby St. 623-7073 
38/TF 



far Ida 



HATTEItAS - Furnished 
2 bedroom, 12 X 60 New 
Carpet. Washer!! Extra 
Clean Delivered, set up 
free!! $4500. VERY 
GOOD CONDITION! 
421-3730 

4 CDB 9/5/79 
40 



WE PRINT nessiMi^.^ 
circulars, shopping 
guides, anything on news- 
print, with or without 
composition aind camera 
services. We uke orders 
for small tabloid newspa- 
pen with press runs as 
low as 1,000 and we print 
for bigger publications 
with 50,000 and more cir- 
cufauion. We've got lots 
of Udewater area cus- 
tomers because we're 
^good, we're dependable 
and we're local. Please 
call Donald R. Frye, 547- 
4571, for information 
and price quotations. 
You win be dealing with 
Byerly Publications, pub- 
lishers of the Chesapeake 
Poet and the Virginia 
Beach Sun. 

71/tf 



2Mi1idatfwS* 



FCHt SALE ~ Schwinn 10 

speed bike, antique 

sausage stuffer. Sears 

toiler oven. Call after 5 

4»M293. 

25 4T CDB 9/19 






VIRGINIAN - 24 X 60, 3 
bedrooms, 2 full baths, 
living room, dining rootn, 
kitchen, family room, 
utility area, central air, 
skirting. Shed incliKied. 
425-8509. 

4 CDB 9/19/79 
40 



MXIE - 2 bedrooms, 
storm windows, porch. 
Can stay on krt! Exodlent 
cooditionl! 461-490? 

4 CDB 9/19/79 
40 



UKAL TOUCH 

No other nedtan is. bound up 
wMi the everyday life of yow 
community more than your 
hoaKtowB newsp^ser. 

McCLUNGS UPHOL- 
STERY - slip covers, 
drapes... FREE 

ESTIMATES... Fabric 
shown in your home. 
DisMunt on all falHics. 
853-3904. 

4 CDB 9/12/79 
71 

MR. A MRS. PAINTtSS 

of the Tidetrater area. The 
quality of a man- the 



14^MitiaMWartitf 



Ji 



fe ^toes fmr ai#ar i^ 



cif 4864430 



BABYSITTING - My 

home, i^e 2-5. 

Chesapeake, Norcova 

Esutes. Weekly. QUI 547- 

8290. 

14 4T CDB 9/19 

GREAT BRIDGE 
■ABYamNG ~ in our 
homes!! For the 
Alb«narle Acres vea call 
482-3539. For Hillw^Rd. 
area call 4K-4I6S. 

4CDB 1^5/79 
14 



ANTIQUES 

Houseful!!! Something 
for everyone! Lamp 
tables . Chairs - Bric-a- 
%ac!! Galore!! Clothes - 
shoes - purses! 
MAHONGANY DINING 
SET!! 499-5544. 

4 CDB 9/5/79 
26 



<1 Hgnlwwli Iw Bwl 



27 



3 PIECE RUST 
NAUGAHYDE living 
'room set, suitable for 
professional office, 
almost new. Sacrifice 
IKkeWn. 481-6544. 
27 



27 



1TCBD9/18 



CITADEL APART- 
MENTS - in Great 
Mdfe. 1 and 2 be^ioms, 
swimming pot^. Convient 
to Khools, diur^es and 
sh<9ping centen. Looted 
on Cedar Rd. Oip this ad 
and reoove S50 off irf 1st 
month's rent. 547-4109. 

4CDB 9/5/79 

LOVELY furnished 1-2 
becboora aptftaacat whh 
color TV. Available 
through May. Reasmiably 
priced. Pacific West 
^partHMBts. Motd 306 
29A a. 428-3633. 

45/TFCI» 
4S 



smooth 
womm. 
pointing. 

71 



touch of a 
Interior-ffitCTior 
424-4687. 

71/TF CDB 



GOOD LUCK cam- 

NEY SWEir KSVKE- 

Dtm't ride ddmney fireal 
Licensed and kmued pro- 
fesaonal methods - We 
won't have you in the 
dust! 547-1226. 
71 CBD-TF 

PROTECT YOUR 

INVESTMBUT - ^ the 
otken ia UdewiMr who 
are havbv me pR^a(iOB> 
a^ deaa nd Mnwmi— 
thek aMomMe. Av m^ 
pofattMst cM W. 0m- 
1SS7. 
71 



^''^•^^miimmmimr^'mmiii^mmm 



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12 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1979 



« 



Beach, blind & bo at 

Rail hunting a real treat for sportsmen who know the bu'ds 



B> i:d ikwis 

> lf§i»l« UtKk Null llnrtiww V> rtttt 



Friday the Virginia State Game Commission made its 
decision on the 1979-80 duck hunting season. The 
season will be in three segments with the first beginning 
on October 3 and ending on October 6, 1979. 

The second segment will begin on November 2 and 
end on December 1, 1979. 

The third will start on December 17 and end on 
January 19, 1980. All you duck hunters get those decoys 
ready because that early season is only a month away. 
^This Saturday (September 8) will mark the beginning 
of rail (marsh hens) and dove season in Virginia. Of all 
the hunting and fishing I do, gunning rail birds ranks at 
the top, along with duck hunting. 

There are not many hunters who will set out after 
marsh hens anymore. Many don't even know that rails 
exist, but of those that do, only a handful will try to bag 
their limit. 

Marsh henning is hard work and requires an almost 
forgot'en skill of poling a flat bottom scow or skiff 
across saltwater marshes and mud fiats. 

In years past, it was no problem to hire a guide that 
not only led you through the tricky marshes but would 
also double as a shover and pole your boat while you 
stood in the bow and shot rails until you made your 
.limit. But these men are becoming a vanishing breed and 
only a handful are left. 

1 was born and reared on the Eastern Shore of 
Virginia and was fortunate enough to have a father who 
felt that part of a boy's upbringing was to be able to 
hunt and handle a boat properly. He taught me the art 
of poling a boat and when and where to flush hens. 

This week I will pass on some basic information and 
try to encourage hunters to gun for rails, a species that 
not only is a delicacy on the table, but one that offers 
excellent sport and inhabits our marshes by the 
thousands. Rails are begging to be hunted. 

To hunt rails you do not need the federal waterfowl 
stamp (duck stamp). You only need the Virginia State or 
county hunting license, depending on where you are 
hunting. 

A proper boat is probably one of the most Important 
pieces of equipment needed for a successful hunt. It 
should be a 12 to 16 foot, flat-bottomed scow or skiff 
with a shallow draft. I recommend a low horsepower 
motor (7'/2-25 HP) because of its easy handling and 
light weight. Although, it has to be off and the boats 
momentum stopped before you shoot . 

I don't recommend aluminum John boats because 
they are so light and tip too easily. That is just my 
opinion. Many r^l hunters use them with success. 
Whatever boat you use, it has to meet. Coast Guard . 
regulations on equipment and markings. 

In your boat, in addition to a oar, ybu should have a 
12 to 16 foot shoving pole. This will be your power 
while you are hunting. You may use your motor to pick 
up dead birdiand to move about from one matsh to 
another. 

Rail season comes in when the weather is warm and 
usually ends before it gets cold, so your clothing should 
be suited for whatever climate is forecasted. Many 
hunters wear hip boots or waders. I recommend old 
tennis shoes. Should you fall overboard, waders or 
boots would pull you under and spell disaster. With 
lennis shoes on, you would be able to swim back to the 
boat or marsh. 

Some hunters I have taken with me still insist on 
boots to keep their feet dry — that's a laugh! Many 
times you will have to get overboard and wade after 
birds or try to flush them on foot and inadvertently the 
water will go over your boots. I have pursued the birds 
in water up to my chest and loved it — it's part of 
gunning rails. 



The weapon you use should be your oldest and least 
expensive shotgun. It will get splaAied with saltwater or 
covered with rain. If you are like me, you can only 
afford one shotgun, so I carry a rag and small can of 
spray WD-40. If you doa% small rast spots could start 
before you get hoow. 

I recommend a 16 or 12 gauge shotgun with number 
IVi or 8 shot Held loads. Marsh hens are not difficult to 
kill and some shots will be close. A heavy load such as 
fours or sixes will blow the bird apart and make it unfit 
to cat. ' 

If you are not real familiar with the marsh area you 
are hunting, I recommend you carry a chart of the area. 
1 have been hunting the marshes on the Eastern Shore's 
seaside for twenty years and still get confused on 
occasions. 

When you enter the marsh the tide is high, but it can 
ebb and make it impcMsible to see across the marsh grass 
before you come out. If you wait too long before 
coming out, you might even find yourself pulling your 
boat across mud flats to find water d^p enough to run 
your boat. *"' 

A good rule is to start working your way back out to 
the edge of the marsh when you notice the tide is ebbing. 
On a good day you should have your limit of hens 
before this occurs. 

On warm, still days gnats and mosquitoes can be real 
pests. I have seen them swarm over a hunter and make 
him miserable. Always carry insect repellent. 

Most successful hunts are planned the night before, 
when a northeastern wind is blowing and the tide is 
going to be above normal. This is the best lime to go. A 
northeaster will cause the tides to be higher and last 
longer. If you don't want to, or can't wait for a 
northeaster, plan your trip when there will be a full 
moon. This will afford a higher than normal tide. 

Should you just take a day off to hunt and a normal 
high tide is forecasted, be sure you are in the marsh at 
least^two hours before high water. That will give you 
plenty of time to flush birds because they will have 
plenty of cover in which to bide. 

When I go gunning for rails, I ususally go during a 
northeaster or during a full moon and take advantage of 
the higher tides. I locate the marsh that I am going to 
hunt and then get up wind of it. I usually do the poling 
and let my gunning partner take the bow. 

Once I enter the marsh, I cut the motor and tilt it up. I 
then start working toward the higher marsh tumps, 
poling the boat and taking advantage of the wind at may 
back. When a siiigle bird is flushed, I let the bow man 
make the kill. Usually another is close by, and I will 
drop him. 

Sometimes t)ie \m» wtQ iwim ahaid of you and try to 
get to denser cover without flying. They swim stretched 
mt flat and only the head and small part of their ba cks 
4rill be visible. They are much easier to kill on the wing 
than when they are swimming in this manner. V 



When you reach higher grass that is too thick for 
poling, let your partner wade while you pole along side 
the marsh. If there are birds in it, you both should get 
plenty of shooting. Just be sure to keep each other in 
sight, so you will not shoot in each other's direction. 

On good tides, some of the high tumps may have 20 
or 30 birds hiding in them and they will give you plenty 
of goo<^ shooting. Old duck blinds are also good hiding 
places for rails during high tides and are well worth 
checking out. 

For more information please write or call me at the 
paper. 



Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge 
open for controlled deer hunting soon 



The Dismal Swamp 
National Wildlife Refuge 
will be opened for 
controlled deer hunting 
this year, Refuge Manager 
Ralph Keel has 
announced. 

Hunts will be held 
November 3, 10, 17, 23, 
and 24, with a maximum 
of 200 hunters per day. 
Approximately 16,000 
acres of the refuge in 
Virginia will be open. 

Hunting will be for 
either sex, with shotguns 
only permitted. Either 
buckshot and/or rifled 
slugs will be permitted. 
Dogs will not be allowed. 
Hunters will be selected by 
lottery from appUcations 
from qualified applicants. 

Permits will be valid for 
only one day, and group 
applications for up to five 
individuals will be 
accepted. 

Applications must be 
accompanied by a target 
showing compliance with 
U.S. Fish and WUdlifc 
Service weapons 
qualifications 'standards. 
Hunters must submit with 
their application a target, 
witnessed by a qualified 
range officer, law 



enforcement officer, or 
FWS employee, showing 
that the applicant has 
either: a) placed three 
consecutive rifled slug 
rounds in a 12 inch 
diameter bullseye at a 
range of 30 yards, and/or 
b) placed five or more 
pellets of buckshot, from 
a single round, in a 20 inch 
diameter bullseye at a 
range of 30 yards. 

The target must carry 
the signature of the 
applicant, witness, and 
title of witness. 

Applicants will be 
selected by public 
drawing. 

Applications, consisting 
of a legibly printed or 
typed letter addressed to 
the refuge manager, will 
be accepted through 
September 25. 

Applications must show 
the full name of each 
applicant, his Virginia 
hunting license and big 
game permit numbers, 
Social Security number, 
telephone number, 
address, age. signature 
and first through fifth 
choice of hunting dates. 

Each application must 
contain a stamped self- 



addressed envelope. 

More details are 
available from the Dismal 
Swamp National Wildlife 
Refuge, P.O. Box 349, 
Suffolk. Virginia 23434 
(phone 539-7479). 
Applications are to be 
mailed to the same 
address. 



IjOCAL TOUCH 

No oilier mediuni ii. bound up 
with tlw everyday life of your 
cofflmunity more than your 
hometown newspaper. 



SUWEUTE 

You're sure to fei a bite if you 
drop a line to the danifiid 
coluiBnt of your conwNHrily 
neirapaper. Yow danified ad is 
part of the honetown news thai 
everybody wanu to md at well 
as the news of the conuminky . 



Legals 

fron page 10 

An ordinance upon appU- 
cation of National Pride 
Equipment, Inc., for a 
conditional use permit for 
a car wash on cwtain 
property located on the 
East side of South Witch- 
duck Road beginning at a 
point 170 feet mote or less 
south of Brady Court, 
running a distance of 
120.21 feet along the east 
side of South Witcbduck 
Road, running a distance 
of 168.81 feet along the 
southern property line, 
nmning a distance of 
142.88 feet along the 
eastern [voperty line and 
running a distance of 
240.31 feet along the 
northern property line. 
Said parcel contains .617 
acre. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

9/5, 9/12 






MARINE REPAIR 



FULL UNE SERVICE 

THtLYNNHAVtMBOATWOMSOiPAIimillT . 



^^"''^'.,,.^ 



MAmNEIIAILWAY 



WOOD, METAL A FIM3I0LASS 



ONI^MWO^EN 



210211. OREAT NECK ROAD 481-6909 




Chiacotcagac Scow oaed by Ed Lewis for rail and duck Iwatiag. 



Dry gear before storing 

Whenever you use your boat, try to put things away 
ah-eady dried out, or arranged so they can dry 
thoroughly as quickly as possible. 

For example, toward the end of the day you can 
spread the anchor line out on the cockpit floor en, route 
back to port, so that the combination of remaining 
sunlight and moving air can go to work on it . ^ 

One of the advantages of having a cockpit cover for a 
docked or moored boat is that since it keeps c(^pit 
items covered and out of sight of passersby, you can 
leave things such as PFD's and cushions spread out so 
they can dry thoroughly. 

A good cockpit will have provisions for ample air 
circulation. & 

Otherwise, marine supply stores sell plastic 
ventilating scoops that can be fitted into a cockpit 
cover. 

When it's time to put the rig away for the winter, the 
MerCruiser stem drive boating authorities recommend a 
really thorough drying-out program . 

The more you look around, the more things you can 
And that will benefit from an airing. 

Many seat cushions, for example, have zippers along 
thdr ^u;k sidn so that foam blocks inside can be 
removed. 



Some kinds of foam soak up a surprising amount of 
water. 

Also, undoing just one small screw usually suffices to 
open up a navigation light so that any small amount of 
water that has gotten in from rain or spray can dry out. 

If you leave the moisture there, it will remain long 
enough to corrode the bulb in its socket. 




OWL CRHK 
TiNNIt CiNTn 

JUNIOR BEGINNER 
TENNIS CAMP 

CMdkiefodbyltovMMoiM// 

$17 per Studmit Per Session 



Sa»H,15.22.29 



I #2 
^•pt»,tS.23.30 



lH)0-2:30p.iii. 
3.-004;30>.ai. 



2:304.'00p.n. 



ilsbmg ^tl^ magk^ drde' 



AeElJWT»Y|IS.OLOTO Mym.OLO 
BMDNECK RD. AND OEM. BOOTH BLVD. 



The greatest mistake 
most "summer" fisher- 
men make is not Ashing an 
area thoroughly, and not 
looking for bass in deep, 
cool water. 

One way to overcome 
this problem is to use a 
method called fishing the 
"magic circle" and here's 
how it's dtme. 

You need a good anchor 
with 100 feet of stout line. 

Using a depth finder, 
liirch for a hole where big 
bass might gather during 
hot weather. 

Study the hole thor- 
oughly on the depth finder 
to locate its e^es, and 
drop the anchor down- 
wind as near the lee edge 



as possible. 

Let out the full 100 feet 
of line, allowing the boat 
to drift until it stops. 

Now look at the area 
you intoid to fish and 
imagine a circle with you 
at the center. 

B^n casting beyond 
the hole along its right- 
hand edge, placing each 
cast approximately 10 
degrees to the left of the 
previous one. 

When you've made 
enough casts to cover the 
area of the circle where the 
fish may be. you've either 
taken a fish or leaned no 
fish are there. 

It's time to move on and 
try someplace else. 





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AUtO PARTS 



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ROBERT W.WADDELL,||,D. 

CUm(EMI$S,M.D. 

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fwmmmfm, wtkim 2345s 



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Capc Henry Uibt 



sard yw. No. 37, Vi. BcMk, V«. 



Vkginia 




SS^HTALS SECTION 

SEP ^^^ 



ST 






TheOflkiftl Newi^per of Virginia Beach 

Wedaesday>jieptember 12, 1979 



Omt Mctkw — 15 cents 



False alarms 
are cause for 
$25 fine 

Virginia Beach Burglar 
alann usen are going to 
have to pay a $23 service 
charge for each false 
alarm to which the Police 
Department raponds. 

Oty Manager George 
L. Hanbury said that the 
frequency of false alanat^ 
are costing the city un- 
necessarily and creating 
safety risks for the gmNil ■ 
public. 

He said police ansmmd 
S,781 alarms in 1977 ttid 
1978 and 97 percoit of 
these (S.606) were false in 
that no burglary or fllegil 
entry occurred. 

The charge will be nuuie 
for each false alarm 
caused by negligence 
under an ordinance ap- 
proved Monday aftaiio<m| 
by Qty Coundl. 

The city had established 
% %S charge fw false 
alarms in 1970 in a resolu- 
tion, but learned that un-' 
paid service charges are 
not enforceable in Coiut 
since Council's enabling 
action mu in a resohitton 
^her than an ordinance. 

Councilman Clarenqe 
A. Holland wutted to 
know. "Who (toennines 
the n^igence?" 

Hanbury said the Police 



See ALARMS, p^e 7 




Airport expansion plans create 
''Catch 22" for Burton Station 



MeMben of dM Mwkes p e ar e- >y -tfc»a>n 
peiforiiuMe, "Hie Mcfcfeant of Vc^ee,' 
MtemOkm Center Theatre Sq>t. 2l-2f . 



take 



fier thdr 
at the Virginia Beach 




The Shakcspeare-by-the-Sea Conqiuiy. sponsored by 
the Performing Arts Unit of the Vh-ginia Beach 
Department of Paits and Recreation, announces the 
season's {vodoctlon, "The Merdiant of Venice", which 
will be presented Septerabo' ^ thru 29 at the VBRC- 
KempsvUie Theatre at 7:3^ p.m. and Sept. 23 and 30 at 3 
p.m. 

"The Merchant of Voike" covers a broad spectrum 
of subjects, but its ccnttid theme is love and money. 
Antonio is the gambling merchant whose friend. 
Bananio, is in lm« with the weabhy and beautiful 
Portia, one of Shaknpeare's ffaiest women. In orda to 
And the best husband, Portia puts each of her suitors 



through a test in wUch they must choose betwem three 
caskets, which Bassanio wins. 

Hie extreme popularity of this mercenary comedy 
comes from the quality of the poetic qweches. the range 
of excellent chara^en and the ranantic elements. ' 'The 
Merchant of Venke" also touches upon many subjects 
pertinoit to our modem times sudi as gunbling. uiti- 
semitism, putting a nuHietary value on love and other 
worldly whims. 

All performances are free but reservations are 
suggested. For reservations contact the Virginia Beach 
Recreation Center-Kempsville, 800 Monmouth Lane, at 
499-1281. 



A report on the Norfolk International Airport's 
expansion plans has compounded doubts that the 
Airport can coexist with its neighbors in Burton Station 
in Virginia Beach. 

A land use compatibility study of the airport places 
Burton Station fn an area that will be too noisy for 
residential use. 

Airport authorities prefer an industrial zoning 
designation for the area and the proposed land use plan 
for Virginia Beach has continued the industrial 
classification for the area which includes Burton 
Station. 

However, homes have been located in the 
community, which is located between the airport in 
Norfolk and Northampton Boulevard, for 100 years, 
according to some residents. Residents of Burton 
Station want the zoning changed to residential. The 
designation will make it possible for the community to 
recdve Community Development funds for installation 
of utilities and low interest loans for home 
improvement. 

Hie uncertainty of the auix)rt's plans for the past ten 
years has placed residents in the Catch 22 situation of 
not being able to sell and not being able to improve their 
lot. 

Gordon Jackson, a consultant with R. Dixon Speas 
which made the land use compatibility study for the 
airport, said his firm would recommend to the airport 
that it acquire a clear zone so that there can be 
assurances that the area beyond the aid of the runways 
are clear of all obstructions such as trees and structures. 

He said that the Federal Aviation Agency has 
recommended acquistion of clear zones and that with 
the proposed expansion of the southeast runway Burton 
Station would unerly the dear zone. 

In a presratation before Virginia Beach City Council 
Monday at an informal session, Jackson explained that 
the airport plans a 624-foot expansion of the 4900 foot 
runway extending to the southeast which will bring all 
of Burton Station within noise zones which would be 
uicompatible with residential development. At present, 
parts of Burton Station are already within the noise 
.;^nes. The use of the expanded runway would bQn| all 
^ eommwilty i4iS&H'''^^maari»'A>r^lmuolKiH 
noise zones. 

The expanded runway, Jackson said, would serve as a 
backup runway for the primary runway. At present 
there are no backup capabilities at the airport. 

The dvilian air use compatibility study is similar to 
the Navy's Air Impact Compatibility Use Zone study 
(AICUZ) except that the civilian study does not have 
crash zones. 

But like the AICUZ study, Vurginia Beach officials 
fear that the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development (HUD) wiO take into consideration a 
community's location in reference to the various zones 
before making money available for development or 
improvements. 



City Manager George L. Hanbury noted that the 
city's zoning classification won't affect HUD decisions 
but that the compatibility study might. 

City planner Robert Scott, however, is working on a 
possible conditional zoning classification whidi would 
cover only the existing residences in Burton Station to 
make them eligible for HUD assistance. 

Ken Scott, executive director of the airport, said that 
the airport has acquired some property in Burton 
Station outright and has easements over other property 
to control heights of structures. 

The final report of the compatible use study has just 
recently been rdeased although the study has been going 
on for a year and a half. ^^.^ 

Jackson said that the timing worked out well becau^ 
the study and the dty's land use pUm were being 
developed at the same time and information was shared 
by the two agencies. 

The Planning Commission approved the land use 
plan with the industrial designation for Burton Station. 
Residents complained at a public hearing on the plan 
and later initiated rezoning petitions. 

Jackson said the consultant's survey shows that 41 
percent of the airport's passengers originate from 
Norfolk and that 28 percent originate from Virginia 
Beach, but the Norfolk figure may include people who 
live in Virginia Beach but work in Norfolk. 

He said that passengers, who numbered 255,000 m 
1965, are expected to be close to a million ip 1880. 
Thirty perceiit of the traffic is military-related. 

In addition to the runway expansion to the southeast 
the airport is contemplatmg an expansion of 1500 ft. of 
the runway to the southwest and is in the process of 
developing a new facility on the south side of the airport 
near Burton Station area for general aviation. This 
facility will be accKsible to the Beach area from 
Northampton Boulevard and Burton Station Road. 
Jackson said that general aviation has been increasing 
tremendously as more companies acquire their own 
aircraft,. : I 

Jackson sees as ideal the expansion of Vurginia Beach 
Industrial Park into Burton Station. EesJdeatialJMBS bi 
Btuton S^tiiM, he nW, wouM nienmhii- Om tt^ort 
which should be allowed to continue to grow. 

Councilman John Baum said that the main probl(mitt_ 
that the highest and best use for the land may n(M be 
industrial. 

Gordon repUed, "If Industrial Park has to expand let 
it do so in this area." 

Baum reiterated that "if it takes too many years to 
accomplish, this is not fair." 

Scott said the airport expansion can be accomplished 
on existing airport property, but that the airport may 
acquire property for a clear zone. "We would Uke to see 
it (Burton Station) developed with aviation-rdated 
industry." 

See BURTON STA TION, page 7 



Cost-of-living 
pay increases 
approved 

Virginia Beach City 
Coundl Mondi^ after- 
noon paved the way for 
cost-of-living increases on 
Oct. 1 and Jan.l and a 
dental health |4an l^ ^>- 
IM-oving the transfer of 
S2,034,951 from other 
funds. 

The increases and dm- 
tal plan were approved in 
the Fiscal Year 1980 bud- 
get. 

Money yns transfered 
from the GenCTal Fund, 
water and tevm Aind, 
Farmer's' Market rater- 
prise fund, Golf Course 
enterprise fund and ,fr<»n 
fund baluices m the City 
Ckuage Internal Service 
fund and the Print SIm>p 
Internal Servke fund. 



Inside Uris week 

Arts airt wUertil nn i Mit . .4 
Oinrcknews .»•••• akitS 

Qasri^^ II 

Com n tn ta ty 3 

Co^unwtaittfiMs 9 

Happcwa^ •••(••■....2 
Lawn and inrtoi 7 

OnMowvortt 12 



New city bilteway plan to be presented 



In three weeks the Virginia Beach dty staff viSi 
jptesoit a bikeway plan incorporating a new concept 
which will s^regate three different types of bike riders. 

In the meantime. Mayor Patrick L. Standbg 
^nwhited Vice Mayor J. Hairy McCoy Jr. to the 
Wama^ Study Committee which has become inadive 
during the past six or eight months and to work with 
Jack Jennings, another memb« of the committee uid 
with the Planidng Department. 

The bUceway plan the dty oivisions. City Manager 
Oeo^ L. Hanbury said, separates the bikeways from 
the main highways. He said tlutt bike paths which are on 



'Letter of thf law' 
causes coundl problems 

Trying to stick to the letter of the law has caused 
Vir^iia Beach City Coundl lots of headaches in the 
{MSt few months. 

The dty has an ordinance idiich requires qjpUcantt 
for msoning to post the pro0lty two weeks before (t» 
Ptattnllig Commission meetly and two weeks before 
Jhe (Sty Coundl meeting «^n the riming will be 
considered. 11w agn has to umounM the dates of the 
meethM4|nig with the type zoiring requeihBd. 

In the past, properties ha^ generally be^ pc»ted 
corre^ tot IHana^ Cwunission meetb^^ but 
inomect^ (N' nM at lA precedlm coun4 n^ttnti. 

"PM-fti^ #f the iK»ting, of course, b to let p^kt In 
the n^^borhood know whtt*s going en so tlMt they 
on 0Epre» Umr opinions pr»or con at the an»opriate 
toe. 

A few OKNttln ago, the dty Muted cracking down on 
t^npOo&au wh(^ ftfopmy w«i »a post^ w wa posted 
ptogmtyt Iqr refusing to conAler the ft«u until tiM 
posting was contc^. As a muh, whenever plannim 
ItoM ive on the agemla, Kvmd have to be defened 
beoMe (rfpo^ng CTTOTS or oiriKions. 

See REZONO^G, pa^ 9 



the highways are dangerous. The plan calls for utilizing 
abandoned railroad easements. 

Pending presentation of Uie plan. City Council 
Monday asked the State Department of Highways and 
Transportation (SDHl^ to leave open an option for 
bike paths in a resolution authorizing the state to 
advertise for construction bi(fa for the Holland Road, 
Phase III project. 

Mrs. Reba McClanan said that she was opposed to 
not having bikeways in out of the most densely 
populated areas of the dty. Sbe said she was not at the 
public hearing on the road h^ by the VDHT but that 
she had made mough references about bikeways in the 
I»st. She said that she had been told that the state 
needed a resolution from Qty Council to include 

bikeways in the rcMd jAan. 

Hanbury si^ested waiting for the staffs bikeway 
plan. The new idea is to s^regate bicycles from all 
motorists by using abandoned railroad easements, he 
said. Putting all the bicycles on main roads may be 
dangerous, he said, and that designating part of the 
h^way as a bike path would ^ve riders a false sense of 
security. He said that Vir^iria Beach Boulevard will 
have tm d^t foot ddewalk irtM cui be used by bikes. 

Iftnbury said that rid^s can be divided into three 
types - tlw ^nith who watt to be off the right of way, 
reoreational rido?. who also want to be off the roads, 
and die mthusiasts who use Wees as their major source 
of trai^KWttticm. They wmUy want a paved area 
(tesignat^ on both sides of the road. 

He said thu H(rfland Road will have a wide sidewalk 
and that Laskhi Road is pittebly the most dan^ous 
bike lane. 

Mrt. McClanan nud, "We*w advancwi beyond bike 
IMthi." 

Hanbury said the type <rf pta we're working on "will 
give the tranqxNtation syston you're talking about, but 
sqr^ated frcoi tte nuin hl^imys." 

ftkCoy sugg^ed ukii« tN state ot lam ata <^ion 
<^OT for Mke ^Mhs. "We've been dragging for a long 
ttaK." 

Coundl pass^ ttie res(4utlM unanim<Misly. 




Checking up 

Charics Kccder of Virginia Beach gets his Mood prcssnre checked by Mike Mwma of 
the Vtofiite Beach Rescue Sqnad. Ffee blood prcoarc checks were fcatnrad nt oac 
of tfw bo4Mln dnring the 1st annnal Horn & Tn^ Show spenaored by Oc VifgWn 
Bea^ Chunber of Conneree tost weekend at Pembrrte Mdl. 

Child care center applications reviewed 



Virginia Beach City 
Council ap{vov«l the ap- 
I^icatran of MarUyn K. 
Summerford-fo^ condi- 
tional use poinit to^per- 
ate a child care center at 
her home on a .2935 acre 
parcd on the west side of 
Englewood Drive, north 
of Englewood Court in 
KempsvUle. 



The vote was 9-1 with 
Councilman Clarence A. 
Holland voting against the 
petition. He said he would 
have votMl otherwise if 
Mrs. Summerford had 
presented support from 
the neighborhood. 
Councilman Geo^e R. 
Ferrdl was absent. 

In a related action, Leo 



and MottTMC Wood, who 
met with considerable 
ORKMitiOT to their M^- 
sitting opaati<m latt year. 
ai^Muentbr paned the Ai« 
ten-mm^s test nM fly. 
ing (xion. bi q^A^ tor 
a use pem^ for two mm% 
years, die Womb ted no 
(^qx^ticm and tad Hbab 
See CHILD CAME, «Ht 9 



■"sr^n 



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■PBiH^^lPi^^niF^PPi^ 



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2 VttGINlA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER U. 1979 



Virginia Beach 
happenings 

Junior Woman's Club meets 
Sept. 18 at Hilltop 

The Virginia Beach Junior Woman's Club will 
meet Tuesday. September 18, at 7:30 p.m. The 
meeting will be held in the Life Federd Savings 
and Loan building at Hilltop. 

Woodstock Civic League 
sets September meeting 

The regular September meeting of the 
Woodstock Civic League will be held on Monday, 
Sqjt. 17, at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Mary Lee 
Malpass. 817 Woodstock Road. A nominating 
committee will be elected to select a slate of 
officers to be presented for consideration at the 
November civic league meeting. 

Data processing group hosts seminar 

The Tidewater Chapter of The Data Processing 
Management Association will host a seminar in 
addition to their monthly meeting on September 
13. The seminar, "EDP Project Estimation", will 
be held at the Lake Wright Hotel at 1 p.m., with 
guest speako-, Robert B. Ware, COP. The 
monthly business meeting will follow, starting at 
6:30 p.m. For more information call G. Lupton at 
441-4623. 

Association of Of flee Personnel 
plans dinner meeting 

The Virginia Beach Association of Office 
Personnel will hold a dinner meeting on 
September % at 6:30 p.m. at the Pine Tree Inn. Vi 
McKee, Ruth Seagle and Emily Yancey, who 
retired this year from the Virginia Beach School 
system, will be lionored. 

Kennedy Enlisted Wives meet 

All Kennedy Enlisted Wives are invited to a 

dessert at Mrs. Ann Myers', 218 Bacon St., 

Norfolk Naval Station, on September 21, at 7:30 

— p.m. CaU 466-1476, 461-88i3, 423-1716 or 587- 

3881 for further information. 

... I ... , . 

Poseidia Institute holds 
membership conference this weekend 

Pc^eidia Institute will hold its 1979 annual 
membership conference the weekend of 
September 14, 15 and 16. 

Registration and open hotise will take place at 
the institute's present office location at 508 
Birdneck Road, Virginia Beach, from 7:30 p.m. 
Friday, Sept. 14. All arc welcome. The fee for the 
weekend is $15 ($25 for a family). 

The Saturday program of speeches, workshops 
and discussions will take place in the Lynnhaven 
Room of Giant Open Air, 2868 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. The Sunday program will consist of a 
boanl meeting open to members, followed by the 
traditional poUuck picnic, to be held at the city 
park located between 23rd Street and Old Virginia 
Beach Road, Virginia Beach. 

Discussion group for Navy wives 
begins this month 

Hie Qiallenges of Military Life, a discussion 
group for Navy wives co-sponsored by Family 
Service/Travelers Aid and the Navy Family 
Services Center, will meet Wednesday mornings 
September 19 through November 7 from 10-1 1:30. 

Hie group will be led by Bobbie Brenton and 
Katie Brown at the Base Chapel, room 13, Naval 
V^phibious Base, Little Creek. Navy wives will 
have the opportunity to share common concerns 
and to explore alternatives in coping with the 
stress of family separation and other aspects of the 
military lifestyle. Call Katie Brown, family 
enrichment specialist, at 622-7017 for more 
information and r^stration. 

Zeta Tan Alpha plans 
annual open house 

The Tidewater Alumnae Chapter of Zeta Tau 
Al^ Fratonity will hold its annual open house 
at the h(mie of Mrs. Linda Bowers Deviney, 993 
Kebo Court, Virginia Beach, on Thursday, 
September 20, at 7:30 p.m. All Z.T.A. alumnM 
residing in the Portsmouth/ Virginia, 
Beach/Nocfolk/Chesapeake areas who would be 
intere^ed in affiliating with the local chapter are 
encouraged to attend this event. 

Mobility on Wheels meets 
at United Way Family Center 

Mobility on Wheels will hold its general mating 
Ml WedneKUy, SqXemb« 19, at 7 p.m. at tiie 
United Way Family C^ter, 4441 South Mvd., 
Virginia Boidi. T^ iwWic is invited to attend. 
Fen- fmb» infwtnatkm call Ellis Rowe at 340- 
1428. 



Refuse to accept defeat in life's battles 



By lEV. W. UEimUMAN 



Often a pcrscMi in couiueling will say they feel 
trapped, isolated and cut off. With their own individual 
stories, they si^ that they feel there is no way out, and 
every day opens into uother blank waU. Sometimes 
mth tean and sometimes with rage, they share that 
everywhere they turn there is a barrier or an obstacle 
that is too great to ova'Cinne. 

A perMm at the start of counseling will state initially 
that evCTythlof is fine — they don't feel trapped and 
that everything is just great. In later sessions, it comes 
out of the subconscious with a very different 
perspective. "Yes, I fpA trapped ... I un frightened ... I 
feel frustrated, like I am alone in the dark ... I am afraid 
of physical pain and emotional pain ... I am afraid of 
being rejected, lauded lU or being hurt ... I am afraid I 
will not measure up or that someone close to me will 
die.? 

Smn^lmet the feelinp of being trapped come froni 
people making decisions that affect our Uves over which 
we have no omitrol. Hiese people often show that they 
are trai^wd in their jobs, by a miserable marriage, 
trapped by advancing age or trapped by burdensome 
memories of the past. 

The answer breaks down into three areas. While I 
know it sounds like I am being trite, there is a great deal 
of truth in refusing to acoq>t defrat. In the middle of a 
situatira U»at appears hopeless, there is a way to 
victory. I often thfaik that the greatness of Sir Winston 
OiurchiU was that he was able to communicate a word 
of h<^ t^^ British people in the blackest hours of 
World War II. 

Oa April 13, Qiurchill spoke to the House of 
Commons in a message that was carried in one word... 
'vict(»y.' Victwy at all costs, victory in spite of all 
terror, victory no matter how long and hard the road 
might be, for wiflnut victory there is no survival. I have 
nothing to offer you but blood, sweat and tears. Later 
when the island wu battered by bombs day and night, 
some frightened leaders were plotting its evacuation. He 
answered, "Wars are not won by evacuation." 

I fed tiiat this has strong possibilities for each of us. 
We can hold on and we can refuse to give in, to 
surrender. We cu remember that there are no hopeless, 
situations untU we become hopeless persons. We are not 
really trtyqicd until we have been beaten within. 

The second stratenr is not only to hold on, but to lean 
into the new future. I like the story of the littie girl who 
wanted to play in a circus parade. When the show came 
to town, the bandmaster needed a trombonist and she 
rigned iqi. She did not march one block before ha 
horriUe sounds created pandemonium. "Why didn't 
ymi tell me you could not play the trombone?" the 



Smttii - Henley engagement 




Let's 
talk 



Adder LV'^th anhoulioe 
the cagagemart of their 
daui^ta, Oaudia Suz- 
aiuie &nith, to James Lee 
Healey. 

Healey Is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert C. Ha- 



ley of Sap pKtp, Cali- 
fornia'. 

Miss S^n teh an d Henley 
are i^aichuUes of i^Uam 
Hi^ Sdiool and are cur- 
rently attending Old 
Domkion Univosity. 

The wedding date is to 
beannounoed. 



bandmaster denumded. The girl answered, "How do I 
know, I never trwd before." Hiat is die qtiriti Lean into 
the future, you run some risk, and wiwa you fail, you 
try again! 

The tiiird strategy for trailed Uves is to try h^^ 
someone else who is tnmqjed. People who lu^ve been 
u-apped by life, those who are anotionalfy upset, caught 
up in grief or pain, tiiose with a fe^ng pf isdttion, are 
often avoided because people say, "I don't know what 
to say to them." Hiere are so many otiier people — 
wonderful people — pec^le who have the courage of 
heart and care enouiM>» and because of them, othCTS can 
break free. 

I think of those who care enough to visit tite nursing 
homes, those who visit menuU hosfrftals and who make 
life a littie more bearable for those txi^pped by mental 
illness. I think of those persons who take food to hc»ies 
where there is sorrow, and who are not afraid of w<Kds 
like "cancer — delinquoicy — divorce — dope" but 
who are there, lending what hdp they can. 

,, These people will never fed isdated, trapped, » cut 
off. Much of what I have fmind to be true about this 
was summed up by tiie Oallkan, wiien He said: "He 
that seeks to save his life shall lose it, and He tiutt kises 
his Ufe, for My sake, shaU fmd it." 



Beach church activities 

The following activities have been jdanned by various 
Virginia Beach churches for tills week: 

Chnrch of the AsccmIob, 4853 Princess Anne Road, 
will feature speaker Father Oorman Sulltvaa Septendwr 
16-21. Times are: Sunday tiw Kth at 7:30 pjB.; 
Monday tiirough Friday fitim 10 to 11:45 ajn. and 7:30 
to 9:13 p.m. Topics will^ "Everymie's Joomey of 
Faitii" and "Life of Faitii for tiie Adult." CaU 499-9659 
for information. 

Iglesia Ni Cristo, 1501 Virginia Beach Blvd., sponsors 
a Family Semiruu- evoy Sunday afternoon. Youth 
senain ars will begin the last Sabuday In September jt 4 
p.m. Call Rubin Garcia at 428-2778 for information. 
^, VlminatBfw* VffilbiA iMiQtkii CNich, 207 18di 
St;ft^,J^,.l}fdpd )Metiiodist Wopen'i. MoipiisgF 
'Morning Manna each week from 9:45 a.B. to 12 noon. 
Bible study will be held each wedt at 7:30 p.m. 
beginning Sept. 26. Call 428-7727 for infonnation. 

Send annonnccflieBt's ot yow dMuch*s aelMliaa to 
Church News, Virgiala BsMh Sw, 131 gaaiMsat 
RoMi, Vtarglnla Beach, VA 234S2. DsBdHf is Miay 
before the Wednesday paUlcatlon iate. 
AanonncemeBts most be typed and doaUeHvaesd. 



Vii^inia Beach births 

Mr. and Mn. Thomas E»A Monte, son; 

Mr. and Mn. Davki l^omu llsdale, daughter; 

Mr. and Mn. WiUam Lee &nith, daughto'; 

Mr. and Mrs. J<^n OUvin Lewis, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Ed^nid Wheder , son; 

Mr. and Mis. WBHam C. Hago-, son; 

Mr. and Mn. Walter Irvin Basnight Jr., son; 

Mr. and Mn. Frank Edward Wdln, son; 

Mr. and Mn. John Hovy Holland III, son; 

Mr. and Mn. Ramon James Stafford Jr., daughtor; 

Mr. and Mn. Steven Jay Russell, dau^tor; 

Mr. and Mn. Manud Hd>ert, son; 

Mr. and Mn. Rkky Allen Swearingen. son; 

Mr. and Mn. Raymond Burl Herring, daughter; 

Mr. and Mn. Wayne O. Souza, son; « 

Mr. and Mn. Harry Edwin Obnsted, son; 

Mr. aiui Mn. ^ephen Edwaftl Simpson, dau^ta; 

Mr. tad Mn. Joi^ L. Fuller, son; 

Mr. ud hto. D«yid Michad Wood, Mm: 

Mr. and Mn. Josq^ lUy Lane, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Himnas Michad Soutiere, son; 
Mr. ud Mn. Didde W. Ckidwin, son; 
Mr. and Mn. Edward C. Holder, daughta^ 



Bctt Sigma Phi iMgiiis new year 



Beta Sigma Phi win 
begin its new sorwity yMr 
with llie theme "Around 
tiie World of Beu Sigma 
Phi." New offlcen of Xi 
Alidu Zeta of BcU Sigma 
Phi are VicU Fanning, 
presideat; Ouutoi^ Oie- 
singer, vice president; 
Nancy Fasteson, record- 
ing secretary; Teresay 
Barnes, corresponding 
secretary; CuxA Parrott, 
corresponding lecretitfy's 



assistant; and 
Pettit, treasurer. 



Diana 



New committee chair- 
men are Brenda Rhea and 
R(«nie Wills, co-chair- 
men of the Social Com- 
mittee; and Diana Pettit, 
Program Chairman and 
diairman of the Cricket 
on the Hearth Craft Show 
to be held at the Virginia 
Beach Civic Center 
(Dome) in July. 



ON TELEVISION WEEKLY!!! 

THE ROCK CHURCH 
OF VA. BEACH 

EVERY 

SATURDAY EVENIMI 

1IMMIP.M.0NCIN 

CNANNa27 

• A ■■wjOTY orao D's womi 

^aMSSTSKAKIRS — -=— 
• SKOALMUSIC, ., r,^^, .. 




a«. and Etailiig Sarvieas 7:30 p.ii. 

W adh|i a d (a y<f»fc»a IO;dOa.m. A 7:30 pifR. 

TIIII|ENOTUNISt4A7-«t02,4A7-ta03, 

4A7-43S7 




- ■^ - 



i^nV^I^V^^H 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 12, 1979 J 



V^iginiaBeach^ 



New \oters urged to attehd Rally Round the Flag 



rv^ 



^j 



Commentary 



Letters 



Virginia sliould cut 
education costs witli care 

Editor, Virginia Beach Sun: 

As I drove down Atlantic Avenue early on tiie 
morning after Labor Day, I was conscious of a change 
in more than the air, which was heavy with the moisture 
of September tropical storms. There was a change in the 
flow of traffic, too. There were more cars than usual for 
that hour on a simimer morning, and there were more 
people standing on the street comers. School had 
started. Teachers were driving to work. Yellow buses 
moved majestically down the street toward teen-agers 
lounging against telephone poles and mothers gripping 
the hands of first graden. 

I remembered that Governor Colgate Darden had 
said that an educated citizenry is a nation's most 
valuable asset. I thought about the progress that has 
taken place in Virginia's school system in the past ten 
years through the efforts of concerned parents and 
dedicated teachers and wise leaders like Colgate 
Darden. But I also thought of the way Virginia ranks 
with other states in the union in terms of the funds she is 
willing to devote to the education of her children. 
Virginians rank 33rd in the percentage of personal 
income they spend on education. Virginia ranks 3Sth in, 
the nation in its per capita apenditure for education^* 
Yet Virginia ranks 19th in the nation in its per capita 
expenditure for highways. 

It disturbs me that, in comparison with other states, 
Virginia places a higher priority on its highways than on 
its school children, a higher priority on the streets that . 
school buses drive on than on the schooling of the 
children riding the buses. I agree with Governor Darden 
that the most important function of a government is the 
education of its children. I believe that we must equip 
out children with the skills and the qualities that will 
insure their becoming productive, contributing 
numbers of society. I do not believe that we should 
Mspend money wastefully in educating our children, but 
neither do I believe that we should trim the state budget 
at the risk of impairing their education, as, api»rently 
both our presoit governor and my opponent are willing 
todo. 

In 1978, the Qeiwral Assembly e^blished standards 

^ ihiUJUiuld have Kdiioed the pomitled average dass she 

of ttudenu in grades 1 through 3 from 26 in 1978 to 22 

!n 1982. Such*a'iSioveT(Swtf(l snudlo* classes not only i 

fe»d*«^^«iii^MHyMb^ftiiflttii4iiiijiAiiikjiiii*yMikii*L.^ i 
^■o uHi NHwit w pRnvMOBu Ajuuuun, u ino nra ? 

the support of parents. Common sense says that the 

^ smaUer number of students for each teacherT the greater — 

the amount of care and attention and individual 

instruction the child can receive. 

Nevertheless, in his opening remarks to the Goieral 
Assembly in January, 1979, Governor Dalton 
recommended freezing the existing permitted average 
dast size in order to reduce "an ab-eady heavy burden". 
For the same purpose, to save money, my opponent, as 
a patron of Soiate Bill 866. supported legidation not 
only to freeze class size but to eliminate reduction of 
class size altogether. Fortunately for our children and 
for our future, that bill was soundly defeated in the 
House Education Committee. 

The concept of retaining large classes in order to save 
mmey does not air easily, though. The new Standards 
of QiMlity for Public Schools proposed for the approval 
of the 1980 General Assembly appear to accomplish the 
same purpose simply by using different language. 

I intend to study these proposed standards carefully. 
As your senator, I wlU seek the advice of classroom 
teachen in order to be sure that proposals called 
"improvements" are in fact means of improving the 
quality of instruction in our schools, not merely means 
of saving money. 

Certainly I bdieve in siving money. I believe that we 
could have a larger budg^ary surplus than we enjoy 
right not if we opiated our government and its agencies 
eflfidoitly and economioUy. But I do not believe that it 
is eithCT fiscally or educati<»ially sound to overburden 
Iffimary teachers to the point that they cannot function 
tffectlvdy. I do n(M believe that it is dther effident or 
economical to pack dassroonu with little childrai in 
ordo- to wvt money. We do not endanger our children's 
lives by jammfaig them Into too few schoob buses in 
(Mtier to save money. We should not endanger their 
ftiture by jamming than into classrooms. 

IM us trim the bi^et wherever possible. (^ us pinch 
pennies. Let us save moiwy. But let us do so wisely. Let 
us pinch pennies, not lives. 

, Bruce G. Mur[riiy 

Siaibi senate cmtUdate 
Eighth senatorial district 



While all citizens are 
invited to attend the Rally 
Round the Flag on &ttur- 
day, September IS, at 11 
a.m., 4747 Shore Drive, 
just east of Pleasure 
House Road, new voters 
will be honored as special 
guests. WUliam F. Ludlam 
Sr., chairman of the Citi- 
zenship Day Committee 
urges all newly naturalized 
citizens and all young 
people who have attained 
voting age to be present. 
The preliminary band con- 
cert by the Armed Forces 
Musical Unit of the 
School of Music, Amphi- 
bious Base, will begin at 
10:30 a.m. 

Ludlam aimounc«l that 
plans have been completed 
for the program and that 
Meyera E. Obcrndorf, 
monber of the Virginia 
Beach City Council, will 
give the welcome. Fea- 
tured speaker will be 
Joseph Canada, state sen- 
ator. I. Steven Krup, De- 
signated Naturalization 
Examiner / Immigration 
and Naturalization Ser- 
vice, and a resident of 
Virginia Beach, will also 
participate. 

The Princess Anne High 
School Band, under direc- 
tion of Joseph Ligart, will 
present a medley of pat- 
riotic songs. Representa- 
tives of the Adam 
Thoroughgood. Lynn- 
haven Parish and Princess 
Anne County chapters of 
the Daughters of the 
American Flag to be 
hoisted by the owner 
Charles C. Hale Sr. and 
his son Charles C. Hale 
Jr. as a highlight of the 
celebration. 

Scouts, veterans and 
active duty service per- 
sonnd are requested to 
weayr their uniforms. The 
program will conclude 
with alrenditic^ i>f ta^ In 

nMtanyvr^fiBW Hito^ 

gave their lives to preserve 



our freedrans. 

Mrs. Rice M. YoueU 
Jr., regent of the Adam 
Thoroughgood Chapter 
and a co-chairman ctf the 
Citizenship Etay QMUnit- 
tee, explained the long 
interest of the DAR in 
dtizenship training. She 
said that Mrs. Eugene T. 
Connors, regent of the 
Lynnhavoi Parish Chap- 
ter , and Mrs. ClareMe J. 
Smith Jr., regent of the 
Princess Anne County 
Chapter, join her in re- 



minding the new citizens 
\^at thdr first duty as a 
dtizen is to vote. She 
announced that arrange- 
ments have been made for 
a nearby re^plstrar to be 
available. Eligible voters 
should have their social 
security number, date they 

moved to present precinct, 
and must be 18 thirty days 
before the next election, 
which wUI be held Novem- 
ber 6. 
The CavaUer Sodety of 



tf 



The price of freedom 
is eternal vigUance" 



Foliowiiig is the tat of 
the presratatioB glvai by 
Mary S. Barraco to 
Tidewater dtfans daring 
naturaUzatioa ccrcaioaict 
Sept. 5. Freedom is 
pricdess to Mn. Barraco, 
who knows what life is 
Hke without freedom. She 
was a poUticd prfaoncr of 
tke Nazii daring Worid 
War n as a rcnilt of her 
worii in the Freach aod 
Belgian andergroaad. 
Mrs. Barraco iuu received 
dccoratioas from botli the 
French and Belgium 
governmeats. She was 
aamcd the Oatstandlog 
Modcra Day Pai^rikrt by 
the U.S. Trcasary 
DepartmeBt and Kcdved 
the highest award 




MoryS 



prcseated by the Robub 
Catholic Church to a 
biypersoo as well as the 
highest award prescated 
by the Natioaal Society 
Daughters of the 
Americaa RevolutioB - the 
DAR Medal of HoBor. 



Good Afternoon: 

I would like to begin by first telling you how proud I 
am to be speaking to all of you gathered here today, 
becoming citizens of what is still the greatest country in 
the free world. To you who have known life elsewhere, 
falls a heavy responsibility, for you perhaps more than 
those who have lived here since birth, know how blessed 
we are here in America and how important it is that^e 
Americans take active roles in ensuring that our country 
remidns the land of the free. 
*"'^Itbtf'li4rt«aifiiHy Ibiffopriattf perhiiw 



SeeFi 



'REEpOi 



me to 
*M page 9 



the Children of the 
American Revolution will 
distribute copies of the 
Flag Code, provided by 
the Citizenship Day Com- 
mittee, to the young 
peo]de present. Learning 
the proper way to display 
and honor the flag is 
another responsibility of 
dtizeiuhip. The Flag Code 
was revised by Congress 
durjng the nation's bicen- 
tennial and now provides 
that the flag may be flown 
at night if it is properly 
illuminated and may be 
flown in inclement 
weather if it is an all- 
weather flag. 



Constitution Week 
is Sept. 17-23 

Do you know what 
famous document begins 
"We the people of the 
United States"? It is the 
United States Constitu- 
tion, signed September 17, 
1787. The glory of the 
Constitution of the United 
States is that it is not a 
govenunent nile which 
people must obey, but a 
people's law which 
government must obey! 
Because the Constitution 
was signed September 17, 
1787, the week of Sept. 
17-23 has been dubbed 
"Constitution Week". 

The Constitution gives 
us the foundation for a 
free, prosperous and in- 
dependent life for every 
dtizen. One of the best 
places to hefp assert your 
free and independent 
spirit is at the Virginia 
Beach Public Library, 
where you can brush up 
on United States history. 
The Constitution is a mag- 
nificient institution of 
American life~and so is 

use the virgmia Bea( 
Public Library. 



Beach 



Migiiua Beadi Son 



HaanByeriy 



DoMdd R. Frye 
GfMnlktaMaK 

PamVaBdcvcer 

E«tor 



SoBdraQccf 

AiiiiHilH^lsMlii 



Vicklc^MI 



Conunuidty and sodfd service curricuhun 

By RICHARD £. HOEHLEIN 

Mwtft«IC«1lMlin B fci»MiB,lTX>Vlq)ito»wcil ■j_ 

The Virginia B«u:h campus of Tidewater Community 
College offers a two-year associate degree in applied 
sdence in public service technology which includes 
training in community and social services. The 
curriculum is designed to provide the community with 
trained personnel to serve as technicians to sodal service 
and welfare professionals. 

Social service technicians perform supportive 
functions under the direction of the professionals in 
various public service, sodal service and wdfare 
agendes. 

Graduates of the community and social services 
curriculum will find employment opportunities in imblic 
and private agendes, including child and wdfare 
agendes, child care agondes, hospitals, mental health 
clinics, mental retardation agencies, probation 
departments, rehabilitation agendes, travela''s aid 
agencies. United Fund agencies, and welfare 
departments. 

Many graduates of the TCC two-year program elect 
to continue thdr studies toward a four-year Bacbdor of 
Sodal Work d^ree rather than entering the work force. 
The TCC program is designed to accommodate those 
who will transfer to a four-year program as well as those 
who wish to enter the immunity service fidd directly 
after graduation and those who are curratly employed 
in community uid sodal service agoides and wish to 
upgrade thdr knowledge and skills. 

Tidewat^ Community CoU^e and Norfolk Sute 
University have concluded a "two-plus-two" 
mstructional agreem«it which allows gnduttes of the 
TCC community and social service progrrai to transfer 
directly to Nmfolk State wMi full aouiemic credit for 
the first two ynn tovraiti the Bachdor of Sodal Work. 
This agreemoit prevmts tlw loss of credits which 
sometimes occurs when a studmt transfov to a four- 
year school. 

The program is designed to i^ovide instruction in 
genmU educational areas as "^nSk u in conununity 
sovice technical and support «>urses. Part of tlw 
curriculum is a coordmated internship in which students 
recdve a(»(kmic credit for volunteo* work pafotnxiA in 
s^ded publk and imwMe ag«»M». Thoie already 
eriiployed in such a^ndes can r«»ve acadonic oedlt 
unvard the intoMhq) fw motk atandy pofraned. 

Courses ia thepr^im offo- instructim in ttw basic 
prindfrfes and practi(» in ccwmunity and sodal service 
WK'k. a look at sodal institutions and the fieM of sodid 
work, and an examination of current and imMpectivc 
^slative programs relevant to the fidd of OMnmunity 
servlom. 

In aiWtion, stiKknts teotiye instnictkHi m spedaUxad 
tfeas SBch u hotUne td^one ctNinsduig, group 
loMiership, and interviewing skills. 
Bteause of its flexibflity hi providii^ basic training 




w 



Today 
college 
counts 



for technidans and the first two years of a possible four 
year degree, the TCC community and social service 
curriculum b for the individual who is interested in 
social work but who is uncertain as tb|iis or her career 
goals. 

Students should consult with the Counseling Center 
or the Humanities Division at the Virginia Beach 
campus to discuss career goals, job opportunities and 
other aspects of the community and sodal services field. 

The growing field of community and sodal services 
demands competent, dedicated employees at all levels. 
TCC is pleased to offer a program which can contribute 
to the incrMsing role of social service in the community. 

Today college countsi 




I 



SUNDeadUnes 

News deadUae for the VIRGINU BEACH SUN Is 
S p.n. Friday for the foUowiag WedaeMlay's cdltloB. 

Artldcf BBSt be Icgihie, prrfnaMy typcwrittea, 
toB hk ipaced ob itaBdanl riaed paper. 

PIctBrcs mad be sharp, ctaur wd accoBpaaied by 
complete iBformatloB. (AH pmoM Ib pictares mast 
beideBdflcd.) 

Tlwre to BO chaife for Bcwi articles or pkrtares. 

PlctBres eaBBot he retarMd aaless special 
arrai^^NBtaarci 



^^i^ginia Beach Son 



12.19T9 

SMY«r,N»» 



PiMiihMl mry W«teM*Qt hy Bycrijr PrtHctfiMM wMlhc 
■Mta office IMSM M 13a Bowort Raai, Vli«tata 
Vh|Wa23«2. 



SUlSaUPtroNRATiS 



WMhtalUmMirAiM 

OwYtw-fTJI 

'n»*V«M-Sl2.M 



Ai Other ARM 

OmYmt-SM* 

Tw*V««i-$lS.« 



li ptH al Urarinvca SMIm taio 



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Your 
number's 

^—3 — "• 

Women wortters and social security 

When the original Social Security law was written 
back in 1935, the working world was a "man's" world. 
The woman's "place" was in the home. Men were the 
breadwinners in the American family. Women were 
wives, and wives were dependents. 

Of course, some women did work then - U) to 13 
miHion are the best figures available. But, most of them 
were young, single women who would quit working 
when they got married. 

The role of women in society has changed 
dramatically since those days. 

In ever-increasing numbers, women are working 
throughout their adult lives. Many women choose not 10 
marry, devoting their lives instead to a career. Those 
who do marry are likely to continue working, either pan 
time or full time. The working mother is no longer the 
exception: Even women who do stay home while their 
children are young often return to jobs later on. 

In 1978, 48 percent of married women living with 
their spouses were working. 

As women's lifestyles have changed, so had the Social 
Security program. The protection women workers have 
under Social Security has steadily increased over the 
years. 

The Social Security Act of 1935 provided only old-age 
benefits to covered workers at age 65. 

The program became a family program in 1939. 
Under old-age and survivors insurance, as it was called, 
benefits also could be paid to aged wives or widows, 
children under 18, or, if there was no surviving widow 
or children, to surviving aged parents. 

The law, though, was still based on the premise that a 
man was responsible for the support of his wife and 
children. Benefits for children were payable on the 
record of a working mother without a husband but 
generally were not available to children of a working 
wife whose husband was present. And benefits couldn't 
be paid to the husband or widower of a working wife. 

The program remained that way throughout the 
1940's, while Congress gave priority to legislation 
relating to the war and postwar problems. 

But, with the 1950 Social Security amendments, 
protection for women workers started to improve. 

Because more women were entering the labor force - 
by 1950, there were over 18.3 million women workers - 
the law began to acknowledge the importance of a 
workings wife's^earnings. Bencfit|u=»aEei< added Jxir. 
dependent aged husbands and widi'Mvers. /^nd benefits 
were now payable to the children of a working mothisr 
f regardless of whether her husband was present . 

Prior to 1967, however, children could|get benefits on 
—their— mother's work record ^miyJf^-sh e met a 
requirement for recent work under Social Security. 

Congress, recognizing that children were dependent 
on both parents, eliminated this requirement with the 
I%7 Sodal Security amendments. Children could now 
get benefits on their mother's work record under the 
same conditions that they could receive them on their 
father's work record. 

Two significant chaages concerning women workers 
and Social Security were made by the U.S. Supreme 
Court. 

In March 1975, the Supreme Court ruled that 
widowed fathers were entitled to survivors benefits on 
the same basis as widowed mothers. 

Before the Court's ruling, if a father died, both his 
children and their mother could get benefits. But, if the 
mother died, only the children could get benefits; the 
father could not. 

The Court's decision provided women workers with 
the ^same survivors insurance protection as men 
workers. It recognized the impact that loss of a woman 
worker's earnings could have on her family. 

In March 1977 decisions, the Court ruled that men no 
longer have to meet a support requirement in order tu 
get benefits as husbands or widowers of women 
workers. 



See SOCIAL SECURITY, page 4 



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"■*■• 



4 VntGINIA BEACH SUNDWEDNESDAY.SEFTEMKftU. 1979 



Virginia Beach happenings 

from page 2 

'For women only' program series 
begins at Oceanfront library 

The oceanfront branch of the Virginia Beach 
Public Library, in cooperation with the American 
Cancer Society, will present a [»-ogram on breast 
self-examination on September 19 at 11 a.m. 

The program will consist of a slide presentation, 
demonstration on the technique of self- 
examination, and a question and answer period. 
Since self-examiniation is a very effective means 
of early detection of breast cancer, make plans to 
attend this informative program, which will be the 
Tirst in a series of programs for women only. 

The oceanfront branch library is located at 1811 
Arctic Avenue at the beach. For further 
information contact Rosemary Houseknecht at 
428-4113. 

Meeting planned to discuss issues 
of Governor's Conference on Aging 

The Tidewater District of the Virginia Council 
on Social Welfare will present a meeting on 
September 20 to discuss issues that will arise at the 
upcoming Governor's Conference on Aging. 
Speakers will be Mrs. Mary Ellen Cox, chairman 
of the steering committee of the Governor's 
conference, and Mrs. Elizabeth Mackler of the 
State Office on Aging, who will serve as 
coordinator for the conference. 

The meeting will be held at the Ramada Inn, 
Newton Road, at 12 noon. All interested persons 
are invited to attend- Reservations should be made 
to Mrs. Naomi Evans, 28 IS Mapleton Ave., 
Norfolk, VA 23504. A buffet luncheon wiU be 
served. Cost is S5 per person. 

Marilyn Hickey to speal( 
at Open Door Chapel 

Marilyn Hickey, teacher, author, pastor's wife, 
and founder of the Life for Laymen Ministries, 
will speak at the Open Door Chapel, 3177 Virginia 
Boach Boulevard in Virginia Beach, on September 
12 and 13. Mrs. Hickey is best known for her daily 
Bible studies where she invites thousands around 
the United States to read through the Bible with 
her. In addition, she currently hosts the Life for 
Laymen radio broadcast heard locally on WXRI- 
FM Radio. 

Meetings with Mrs. Hickey will be held at 10 
a.m. and 7:30 p.m. both days. Adniunoii is free 
and the public is invited. For further information, 
call the Open Door Chapel at 340-1441 . 



/: 



Bayside Hospital, Red Cross- 



sponsor Bloodmobile Monday 

i 

Bayside Hospital and the Tidewater Red Cross 
will sponsor a Bloodmobile, Monday, September 
17 frotn 12 noon - S p.m. at Bayside Medical Plaza 
(next to Bayside Hospital). 

Bayside Hospital offers a free Community 
Heartsaver (CPR) class every first Tuesday of the 
month. Call 460-1911 ext. 348, Community 
Relations to register. 

Parents program offers chance 
to share ideas and concerns 

An eight week parents program. The Early 
Years- Fun and Frustration, will be held at Boone 
Clinic Tuesday mornings September 18 through' 
November 6 from 10 to 1 1 :30. The program series, 
sponsored by Family Service/Travelers Aid^ is 
designed for parenu of children ages one throtfgh 
five and will provide an opportunity to share 
common ideas and concerns about raising 
children. 

The fee of SlO includes the cost of babysitting at 
the base nursery. For more information and 
registration call Katie Brown, family enrichnMnt 
specialist at 622-7017. 

American Red Cross presents 
water safety instructor course 

The American Red Cross is offering a Red 
Cross Water Safety Instructor Course. The course 
will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 
to 9:30 p.m. Septembo" 18 thru November 6 at the 
Virginia Beach Recreation Cotter. 800 Monmouth 
Lane. 

All participants must have a current Advanced 
Lifesaving Certificate and be 17 yrars of age by 
the first day of class. For information on 
registration call the recrration coiter tt 499-1281. 

Coast Guard Auxiliary boating 
and seamanship course offered 

Coast Guard Auxiliary flotilla S3 is offering iu 
13 lesson faU Boating Safety and Seamanship 
Course to the public beginning Thursday, 
Septonbo- 20. OasMS will be held on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays frcmi 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Indian 
River High School in Chnapeake and include 
information on aids to navigation, weather, boat 
handling, marliiupike seamanship, engines, 1^ 
requiremaits,^^ jnkKing. 

Paricipants mh take two exams and receive a 
certificate uixjn/succnsful completion of the 
course. There^l be no diarge for the course but 
persons wishing to purchase materials can do so 
for S7. FcH- ftirther information pl^ue call Mel ot 
•Elaine Cochran at 420-71^^^ 



Sartre's *Nb Exit' 

to be presented ^t VWC 

Jean-Paul Sartre's "No Exit" wiU be pfMiited at I 
p.m. Thursday, FHd^(. and Sitwday^ SqMmber IS- 
IS, in the Fina Arts BuB^ni lUiMaria] MA of Viffiiiia 
Wesleyan CoU^. There U no aib^iUoa ^arge, citt 
reservations are suggested. (CaU the iwHcMXNUfd at 461- 

)232.) 

"No Exit" is a psychological drama which explores 
the bam nature (rfpeqple. The play bmim with a valet 
ushering the other three characten, one-at-a^ime, into 
HeU. The story develops as the character! begin to 
intovct. 

Kevin Oarvey, a senior theater and EngUih taaiot 
from Falls Church, it the student director and producer. 
He has had roles fai recent VWC productions. inSudini 
"Rhinocerous" and "The Inapector General." 

Pbying the role of Joee Gardn to Gary Henry, a 
senior theater nu^ ftom P(«rtsmoutb. He had roks 
last year in "The Apple Tree" and "Endgame." 

Estelle Rifauh ii porttayed, by Karen Morris, a 
sophomore biology ini^or from Oux)ga Lake. New 
York. 
^ Merry Fink, a junior educition major from 

Pktwfd b one of the many gronps participattai hi the Neptanc Festival Heiltaie Day aethities schcdaM SiUHlay, »•!*?»*<»«• ^^^'^,^'*f?^!^\ ....w .i— »^ 

September 16 from noon to 6%. Festivities WiU take place on On Vliitada ■each bo«dwalk between 24tt 7* ?*** vft^?* SL^^i?^' li S^ I^ 

gJl^i^ "^ nu^or from Vir^a Beadi who had rolet ttst year in 

• "The Apple Tree" and "The Inspector General." 




Festival participants 



Tlay dictates forms/ says Beach artist 



"The clay dictates the forms," says Sharon 
Uoodworth, who will be leading a workshop in forming 
and glazing porcehun all day Saturday, September 13 at 
the Virginia Beach Arts Center. "Porcelain is finer- 
grained than stoneware clayTyyt dries quicker. You 
have to work quickly with it, so y^r forms are likely to 
be more whimsical, more delicat^" 

Students in the Saturday workshop will have the 
onxntunity to observe Ms. Bloodworth's techniques as 
wdl as to make their own' prbcelain pieces, which will be 
bisque fired; arrangements will be made to glaze and 
fire them in November. You can register by calling the 
^ rts Center at 171 1 Arctic Avenue. 



Ms. Bloodworth studied at ODU, the Corcoran 
School of Art, and Moore College of Ari. She was for 
three years Potter in Residence at Wallingford Art 
Center and has taught in Virginia, Maryland and 
Pennsylvania. 

Initially known as a potter for her work in porcdain, 
she has also been doing strong sculptural pieces in 
stoneware. She is director of the Ceramics Annex at die 
Virginia Beach Arts Center. The recipient of a Special 
Award this year as a Virginia Artist, she has had many 
one-person shows, including one at the Arts Center in 
1978 and anothte at the Virginia Museum. 



Two contrasting views 
exldbited in Sept. sliow 
at Beacli arts center 



Virginia Cliapter of Young Audiences 
holds auditions for performing groups 



The Virginia Chapter of 
Young Audiences, Inc. 
will hold a two day series 
of auditions of perform- 
ing arts i^dups for accred- 
itation with the organiza- 
tion, a( cNdrldttc: State 
Unhrersity, September 20 
and 21 in the Fine Arts 



Building. Marilyn Hoyt, 
associate ^ director of 
National Services will re- 
present the National 
Young Audiences' Office 
in New York. Minette 
Coc^ia nAiiJMm AlU- 
son, progrtun and associ- 
ate program directors, will 



SOCIAL SECURITY— 

from page 3 

Previously, the law required men to prove J hey were 
dependent on their working wives. Wi>iT>cn, on the other 
hand, did not have to prove dependency on their 
husbands. 

Now, benefits art generally payable to a husband or 
widower under the same conditions that they are 
payable to a wife or widow. 

Many other changes were made in the social security 
law over the years. Virtually all of (hem affected 
women, either as workers or as dependents of workers. 

Disability insurance was added i<' 1956; Medicare for 
the aged, in l%S; and Medicare for certain disabled 
people under 65, in 1972. . 

The age at which people can star> g:;'.ting benefits has 
been lowered. Now, workers and their spouses can start 
getting reduced retirement benefits at age 62. Widows 
and widowers can get benefits as early as age 60. And 
disabled widows and widqwers can get reduced 
payments at age 50. 

Benefit amounts have been increased many times, and 
will be increased automatically in the fa'.'/ ' to keep 
pace with the cost of living. 

Other improvements, too numerous to mention, have 
been made in both the social security and Medicare 
programs. 

Today, the Social Security law reflects the "new" 
working world ~ as much a woman's as it is a mj.n's ~ 
and all workers have similar Social Security procection. 

Even now studies are being made on the changing 
roles of men and women. 

The Norfolk Social Security Office is located at 200 
Granby Mall - Federal Building - Room 600. Hours are 
9a.m. 10 4:30 p.m. The phone number is 441-3401 . 



review the ensembles, 
along with the Virginia 
Ouirter's Board of Direc- 
tors. 

Groups will be selected 
for their ability to com- 
mui^i^e tl»rir'art In Jfia-^ 
logue presmtidionS, as' 
well as for the quality of 
their p«-formance. The 
Virginia Chapter of 
Young Audiences pro- 
vides 50 minute concerts 
and workshops through- 
out the state. The chai^er 
matches the fee so that 
schoob and institutions 
I»y only half the perform- 
ing artists' fee. 

The new roster of en- 
sonbles will be annoimced 
after the 21st. For more 
information about the 
auditions, or to book a 
perforoumce, call (804) 
426-7052 or (804) 623- 
5268. 



Deadttne extended 
for Governor's 
Aivards for the Arts 

In order to accomodate 
requests of arts organiza- 
tions, individuals, colleges 
and universities who have 
expressed concern of 

Governor' s Award s for 
the Arts, Bravo Arts Edu- 
cation has extended the 
deadline for nominations 
to Friday, Sept. 21. 

The awards are open to 
any individual, arts organ- 
ization, public or private 
organization that has 
made significant contribu- 
tions to the arts in Vir- 
ginia. Nominations may 
be made by anyone living 
in Virginia. 

For more information 
write Bravo Arts Educa- 
tion, 5 North 6th Street, 
Richmond, Virginia, 
23220 or call 804/644- 
7890. 



Two viewi of Uie wwld 
are contrasted in the Scp- 
temba exhiUtimi at the 
Virginia Bendi Arts Goi- 
ter. Dorothy Pagan it 
showing landscapes in 
pastel, dnwn from tiie 
coimtryside arotmd her 
home hi FtankUn, Vir- 
gfaiia, tlutMi^ October 2. 
In the small galleries win 
be works by a gnwp of 
Calif omia Image h&fcets • 



boxes, assemblages, and 
two-dimensional pieces 
drawn fhm the worid of 
the unconscious. They win 
ba on view until Oct. 14. 

Tlie Arts Center, widdi 
^ offers dasses, lecnucs 
and worksh(qM, is located 
at 1711 Arctic Avenue. 
Exhibits are free dnd open 
to the pobHc firom 11 to 4 
dafly aio9t &mdays. 



Great Neck library presents 
craft class for cliildreii 



The Virginia Beach 
Great* .>/Jlecfc u Bfanidb^ 
LibMy.;f|lll ylMMlMlotn 
"Banners and nag*" 

^ftn~€MUa~cNttttP«UI9^''9QP*^ 

tember 22, it 2:30 p.m. 

The dass is free and is 
open to cfaibhren afes 7 to 
12. Since the dasa is open 
to only 13 diQdm, r^i»> 



tration is required. To 
N wiiai g.^aftj te jhB Q wat 

zf HtfUi 9pVI# IrlllWfrf'/ot?; 

The Ch«at Neck Braadi 
4ibn^4r locatad at42Si~. — 
Bayne Drive in the Hilltop 
vca <^ Virginia Bench , 
Fof farther informttioa 
ocwtact Dd^ie Garter at 
481-6094. 



Swim-gym program includes 
Virginia Beach bus pick-ups 



The popular Norfdit 
YMCA Swhn-Oym Pro- 
gram for youth starts 
again on Sq;>tember IS. 
Bus transpOTti^cm is i^o- 
vided to and from the 
YMCA. Bus pfck-iqM hi- 



dude st<^ in ^^qlnia 
Bca^ and Ghcsi^Make. 

The program inciodes 
swinaning and gynmutic 
lessons hdd Satordnys, 
for ciilit weeks. All ddO 
levds wiD be taught. 



SOLVE MtMEVWOUUES 

tkingi you no lonser.need ud 
ia cu do widMut. Low ooit ud 
Ml quickMliiig! 



How' to Mp Ml«« 



your. 





RAHAN 
WICKER 

Ow pncM are laww AM 
MMt TMewi^sMKa> 



byFielis-Raed 
darliCafiial 



The 
nacetoSb^ 
aatba 
Oator 



TapQnalty 

VnCKER 

•y Typhaan, 



HtkttiQ J^uiititure 



MIMULTa. 

Wf l«.IHIf-fMMIMtnNMIk.N.t. 



l-nM4l-«444 






Boogie At Lunch 

SPECIAL LUNCH TtME 
CLMS8E8 nFITYOUR 
BU8YSCHE0ULE 

BEAHEALTHIEIt, 

HAPMSR 

YOUl 

aFimanitiiMs 

IxtralM to Music 

DWoEgMlpiwiit 

DNyliytlMMdiilli 

CNOMI nHMI MBMINMQ • MIVNmNATI 
MID MMf ANCO CUUIWi 

COMf OMI 
HJkVEAOOODBODY! 

Body Boutiqui 




Ktmufimf&RmM, 

NNUTiUrrMSIiOPKS 




COME TO THE 

lUAU 

AT 

THE TIDEWATER DINNER TIffiATRE 



EiuoyUVE ON STAGE! 




ablnliffNIWC 

„-.--yL';_ w»it 

n^^ ^^^B Jl^n ^^^WH 



^HOME SNQiANTED EVranNG" 
BU)ODY MARY BTHK GIRL I U)VB" 

"I'M oomtA wA«i rtwt man right 

OUTTA MY HAIR- 
THERE 18 aomim uke a dame" 

" YOL NGBR THAN^iONGTIMr 
"WONDBRrUlGUY" 



R1»l»VA'nai% 



461.SttS 



I-^I.W»IJ»-WJ 



VIRGINIA BEACH SLND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 12. iry9 5 



Home ownership is an attractive investment 



By JUDITH CRHOAPES 

Q. I've been contan- 
plating buying a house in 
Virginia Betxh, wettreaify 
a condo, but I'm not 
certain it's a good idea. I 
probably won't be Hvtng 
in it as my job ke^ me 
moving most of the yea'. J 
won't be retiring for at 
least 15 years. I'm slngk 
an^ I have no one to look 
after excqrt myse(f. — J.I. 

A. Besides a pension, 
one of the best invest- 
moits you can use toward 
your retironent is a hmne 
purchase. The reason for 
this is that when you 
purchase a house, you an 
building equity without 
being taxed on the gdns. 
The new law whidi allows 
a one-time $100,000 tax 
exemption after age 55 
also makes home owner- 
ship a more than attractive 
investmoit. The fa<^ diat 
you will not Uve there only 
means you will necessarily 
need someone to watch 



You 

and your 

money 




over your property, see 
that it is maintained and if 
you rent it, collect the 
rents make depmits, re- 
paire, etc. 

Property seems to be 
coQtiiuiaUy rising in value, 
and you diould have no 
qualms about purchasing 
now, rather than later. 

Q. I Affve often won- 
dered about the vahte of 
buying flight Insimmu 
when I travd on a business 
trip. I guess it's because I 
probaNyfe^ I don 't have 
enough Insurance — L.F. 

A. If you are under- 
insured, or think that you 
are, you diould be talking 
with your insurance agent 



or broker, not using the 
airpOTt vending machine. 
Insurance bought in ^s 
way is much more expen- 
sive than a policy which is 
purdiased in the tradi- 
tional manner. 

Q. Why should I buy 
insurance on my car? It's 
<mly worth about $500. — 
L.Y. 

A. First of all, when 
you are buying insurance, 
you are transferring the 
risk of any loss to your 
insurance company. You 
pay a small amount of 
money to protect yourself 
against an accident you 
might have, which would 
mvohre another car and its 



occupants, for nample. 
In many statm, it is 
against the law to drive 
without liability insur- 
ance. You should 
carry liability insprtnCe, 
even if it is the minimum 
amount which is allowed. 
As far as collision insur- 
ance being necessary, 
many experts feel that 
there is no reason to buy it 
if your car is worth under 
$1,000. Hie best reason 
cited is that uninsured 
collision loses are tax de- 
ductible. 

Joditii Rhpades Is a 
frec-fauKc writer who has 
spent 15 yean in l|ic 
secnrities indn8tr^ If yon 
have any qncatfew reiari- 
lag teance, secsuHtea, or 
the stodt ouufcct, yon auiy 
aMrcis them to her in care 
of thii newspaper. Pkaae 
be ccrt^ to endoac a 
self-addressed, atamped 
envelope if yon wish a 
personid refrty. AOow a 
mtiilMnM of six wed(8 to 
recdve an answer. 



Consumer mterests 



insur- » i_ 1 4. 

^ Cedar siding needs protection from tlie elements 



The ins and outs of basement waterproofing 



Cwrecting basonent wMcr pt<Mem» can be a tricky 
bnsiness for homeownas. Some ptiMem are solvable, 
some are not. The B^er l^sineis Bureau advises 
homeowners to do some "homework" before 
undertaking vat^ot repairs: identify the source of die 
witter, learn about waterj^oofing methods, and obtain 
wptten estimates from reputabte contractors. 
^jj^usaesaadcwai 

Watw and daifltos ih basements can be oused by 
leaks, seepage oi^^idenaation. Leakage, the most 
common cause of wR iNtfenMiU, usually is the most 
difficult water proUem to sohw. Watar alters the house 
through cracks or openings in masonry walls, 
iioneycombed concrete, pwous masonry, rar imperfect 
waterproof coiuings. If the cracks are obvious, the 
homeowner may try phigging them with expenme 
cement, extmding downqwuts and drains so that their 
output is carried further away from the home, 
improving drainage around the home by sloping the 
ground away from Uie^ratnde f<wnda^m, ox shidding 
basement windows. 

tf^lftsl%«isaics do^iaet wotkv^w if the level of 
grounarnMV •^«« MP is ajulH i lawlj m»iffitMn 
homeowner may have to coiuider more costly 
wat erpr oo fing RWtho(b. Floor kalOr nost es^erts 
agree, are best contrdUed by the installation of a wall or 
recdving tank (sump), drtins, and an dectric pump 
under the basement flow. Serious leakage through 
basement wdls usually an be corrected ef fectivdy from 
outside by excavMhig (town to the base of the walls and 
coating the walls with layers of ivotective barriers. 
Another mrthod of ieak protection involves the 
injection of sodium bencmite mto the soil surrounding 
basement walls. Its success depends upon whether there 
are any undaffround barriers that can impahr the 
effectivmess of the matoial and upon the tkSi of those 
injecting it. 

The second cause of water in basem«iu is seepage 
(capillarity). Absorbett wall material <baws mdsture 
from the offth outeide 1^ aqriUary Kt^ simUar to the 
way a spoagie soaks up wamr. This reiuhs in (tamp qwts 
on floors and walls if the water doesn't evaporate flut 
enough. If mild, this seepage usually can be eUmhiated 
))y thorou^ abdication of a basemoit waterproof 
(Mint. 

Condensation, the third came <tf inut or ttanqjHMSs 
in basements, is caused by moisture oolle(Ahig on 
interior surface of widls and floon whoi the humidity 
is high. Moisture in the Imement air eoiidenaes on the 
ipooler waUs. This is most an^arent whm an exposed 
cold water pipe sweau. To rechioecondenlMtion, water 
pipes should be insulated and, if possible, the basement 
heated to warm lip floon aiKi waDs. 

The best tune for protectbig a home's basement 
t^dnst water problons is during construction. Today, 



Irelephone solicitations may be illegal 

The Office of Consumer Affafrs of the Virginia 
Department of Agrfcnlture and Consumer Sovioes 
(VDACS) has issued a warning concerning an 
organization calling tedf the **Natlonal Association 
fot Spedal Needs ChdiKn" which has been stdidting 
contributions from dtkras aooss the state allqedly for 
charitable purposes. Mort of the calls have been 
reported in tlM m^n^dltan weas. 

The organization has not re^terol with the 
Commissioner of VDACS as required by law. 
Contributes are cautioMd that thdr gifts to sudi an 
organiation may be UMd for mh« than diariuble 

work. 

Citittns are ur^ to get the facts befwe pnNidsing a 
donation as the remh of t^|4ione sol^atimis. 
Dfflumd to know Uw naiM of the individuia wekim the 
soUdtations, who they are woricing f<w, the full oflidal 
naqtf of the charity and an indication as to exactly wiiat 
permit of total donntfams b going to the dwritaMe 
organizadoh. Aiqr Ic^inate charity wiM gtaKtty supply 
you with any or all of dib toformrtion. 

It wmiM atoo be wise to (Acck widi the &tte (Mfke of 

Consumer Affturs (toU free nmtots 1-800-S52-99C3) or 

your kical charity Itoen^ ageaey to sac if the 

organization has compiled with any rtgistraaon 

> requiren^ts of the Iw. 



new homes under a home owner's warranty policy 
usually have a one-year provision protecting the 
homeowner from the cost of repairs caused by actual 
trickling of water. Unfortunatdy, purchasers of older 
homes and the average homeowner enjoy no such 
protection. 

When and what to dga 

If major waterproofing work seems to be called for, 
the homeowner should obtain written estinuUes from at 
least three reliable, permanent contractors whose work 
has been reconunended and verified. Estimates should 
indude the cost of labor and materials, how long the job 
will take, how long the work will hold up and what the 
contractor will do if it doesn't, and the contractor's 
signature. 

After a contractor has been selected, the homeowner 
should ask for a written contract in accordance with the 
estimate. All terms of the final contract should be clear. 
It may be wise to have a lawyer review it before it is 
signed. Agjiarantee should be^utof^voy contract. It 



By GENE GARY 

Q. About one yetw ago, 
we purchased a newly 
built house in Virginia 
Beach. We were told by 
the builder that the cedar 
siding on the exterior did 
not need any treatment. 
Since then, light patches 
have appeared on the ad- 
ing which has greatest 
exposure to the weather. It 
has a splotched appear- 
fl ance of drying out. What 
should be done to this 
siding? We like the natural 
color and would prefer 
not to paint it. Can you 
give us any help? — 
Arthur M.T. 

A. There is no way of 
keeping wood very long 
with exactly the color and 
natural appearance with 
which it comes from the 
lumber yard. Without any 
finish o^ protective coat- 
ing, the wood will weather 
and change color, which 
many owners like, but the 
wood also will deteriorate. 
All finishes penetrate into 



the wood to some extent, 
displacing air from the 
wood cells and t|ttreby 
(teepening the color or the 
wood. This is true even 
though the finish is color- 
1^. For example, water 
darkois wood. In your 
case, probably the most 
satisfactory finish is a 
water-repellent preserva- 
tive, which is a solution of 
hydrocarbon wax, such as 
paraffin, resin or resin 
and nonvolatile oU, and a 
preservative, such as 
chlorinated phenol , in 
mineral spirits or other 
volatile solvents. It pene- 
trates and continues for 
some time to spread into 
the wood, which may 
remove or reduce the 
effect of your splotches. 

Q; I noticed in a recent 
column that a reader had 
problems with moisture 
on his windows. I e^gxri- 
enced this nightmare for 
two winters and know 
how frustrating this can 

be. My problem was even 

\ 




Here's 
how 



iBr^^ 




worse. 

I had moisture on my 
walls and in my closets. It 
happened that my water 
heater did not work and I 
called our gas company. 
When a representative 
came, I told him there was 
a strange odor in the 
basement when the furn- 
ace went on. He took off 
the furnace flue, aid dis- 
covered the chimney was 
clogged. He removed 
some of the soot and told 
me to have it cleaned 
thoroughly, which I did. 
He said that in a few days 
my windows and walls 
should dry, whu:h they 
did. He said he has run 
into the problem many 



times, and a clogged chim- 
ney is usually the reason. 
I had tried all the sug- 
gestions you offered, but 
nothing helped. You may 
want to advise your 
readers with siriiiar pro- 
blems to have their chim- 
neys checked. If their 
problems are like mine, 
they will be more than 
grateful. 

A. Thanks very much 
for your information. We 
appreciate helpful hints. 

Questions on building, 
home maintenance and 
repair may be sent to 
Here's How in care of this 
newqiaper. 



Single-family homes are leading burglary target 



should include a statemoit of what the contractor will 

p^wq^JoVln^ anffjiStar^eiit (hat 

the contractor is liable for all property damage caused 
by his work. The homrawner should be sure that all the 
work has been done before signing a completion 
certificate. He or she should not sign the certificate if 
there is a valid complaint . 

The Better Business Bureau urges homeowners 
considering waterproofing to pro<^ with healthy 
skq>ticism. The success of basement waterproofing 
depends upon many factors including soU composition, 
rock formations, and the property's water table. The 
solutions are as varied as the problems and the wise 
homeowner will gather as much information as possible 
before committing to any major repair work. 



The single-family home 
is by far the preferred 
target in the three-million 
burglaries committed each 
year, according to a recent 
review of government and 
academic studies. A Cali- 
fornia investigation, for 
example, found that home 
burglaries accounted for 
41 percent of these re- 
ported, with apartments 
and other residences run- 
IMglecond^ith a per- 
cent. 

Reia41~ busin«s«»s^ 
headed the burglar's list 
14 percent of the time. 
Among other non-resi- 
dences, industrial, manu- 
facturing and construction 
companies came in se- 
cond, and schools - often 
the target of juvenile de- 
linquents - wo-e third. 

*'The moral for home- 
owners isxlear," said Ron 
Matson, vice president of 
sales and marketing for 



Ridesharing forum scheduled- 



Citizens of Virginia 
Beach are mvited to attend 
a public forum mtitled 
"Ridesharing" this Thurs- 
day, Septembo' 13, at 
11:43 a.m. at the Colonial 
Stores Cafeteria, 3616 
East Virginia Beach 



Boulevard in Norfolk 
(Norfolk Industrial Park). ; 
Sponsored by the 
Southeastern Virginia 
Planning Di^ct Com- 
mission in cooperation 
with the Tidewater Trans- 
portation Dutrict ConiT 



mission, the forum will 
present detaUed informa- 
tion on how to join or 
establish a ridesharing 
program which meets 
transportation needs and 
saves money as well as 
gas. 



Let us handle your 
second mortgage . . ., 

We'll make you feel 

right at home. 

A second mortgage is a great way to get money fast— when 
it's handled correctly. 

The people at Instaloan Financial Services understand this, 
so we all work hard to provide the helpful. Informative kind 
of service that really makes a difference. You'll know it the 
minute you stop by or give us a call When its time for your 
second mortgage, we can make you feel right at home. 

lMSTALOMM% 

Financial Services, inc. 

VIRGINIA BEACH OFFICE 
John Sargenl. Jr. 3627 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

Branch Manager Virginia BmcH, VA 23452 

Can Mow. . . 104/4634333 -Or IMi TMt ConpHi Fw Mart MemwtiM 



Name .^_ 

Address 

Phone 



Honeywell Protection Ser- 
vices. "With burglaries up 
19 percent over the latest 
five years recorded by the 
FBI, residences in particu- 
lar need much more pro- 
tection than they are get- 
ting. This is underlined by 
the fact that financial 
institutions, which gene- 
rally have good security 
systems, are least often 
burglarized.'! 

Doors and windows 
were almost always used 
jbylhecriiiihiBls'.to get in. a., 
building, the burglary 
studies found. While in 



ras were most often taken, 
with money, jewelry and 
furs, and clothing and 
furniture trailing in that 
order. 

The investigators agreed 
that residences were most 
often burglarized in day- 
light on weekdays, while 
business establishments 
were attacked most often 
at night on weekends. 
Eight out of 10 burglary 
attempts tffe successful, 
and over 80 percent of 
liirgiars get away with 
their crime. 

"The California study, 



iiiosl cases they forced a wMch was flmded by the 



lock, broke a window or 
smashed a door, in a 
surprising number of in- 
stances they were able to 
get in simply by raising a 
screen, opening a window 
or walking through an 
unlocked door. 

Annual burglary losses 
totaled $1.4 billion, 
according to the most 
recent FBI report, 
although the average loss 
is under $500. Easily sale- 
able items like television 
and stereo sets and came- 



U.S. Department of Jus- 
tice, shows that burglars 
usually avoid buildings 
where sensible security 
measures have been 
taken," Matson said. 
"There were far fewer 
attempts made on buUd- 
ings with lighted, clearly 
visible entrances and on 
those that had alarm 
systems." 

Matson said that police 
offidals are in general 
agreement that the great- 
est protection is offered by 



a central monitoring sta- 
tion alarm system, in 
which electronic sensors in 
a building detect an in- 
vader and flash a signal to 
trained operators, who 
notify police. These 
systems can also be con- 
nected to smoke detectors 
to warn of fire. Jewelry 
stores and other particu- 
larly attractive targets, he 
said, often can't get insur- 
ance without Tuch a 
system. 

"The burglar's life 
would be much more diffi- 
cult if every building h^d 
ItroHg doors with dead- 
bolt locks and if the most 
accessible windows were 
protected by key-locking 
sash locks," Matson said. 
According to the Roche- 
ster N.Y. police depart- 
ment, "If your doors and 
windows can delay a 
burglar for four minutes, 
the chances are he will give 
up. 

INTERESTS EVERYONE 

The varied contents of your 
hometown newspaper give it a 
readership that includes every 
age group. 



Come to Haynes 

it's furniture country 



. . . home fashion's spoken here . . .speaking your kind of 

language in a relaxed, friendly kind of way, from dining to 

sleeping . . . elegant to avant-garde . . . living room to patio . . . 

homespun to import . . . velvet to wicker at VALUES GALORE 



Whatever you need for 
your home, you'll find at 



nrost o«»venient time to call 




^ a «i im-mt! 



^^mw "? ? ^.'•'i».W.^.^,* T "~.tC~~~ ~ "?■ ^ * 1 *'^' •'1, 



i^Vil> W^ 



■v^^pv n ■ i I I ■ I 



-w*i;«^^^^^^«^t^«w^ww^^p<p^Fi. ««-««« !■ ■ ■ 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN D WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 12, 1979 




Decor 



score 



Modern is cool 



By BARBARA HARTUNG 

Q. I am planning to 
re-do my dining room and 
would like a change of 
pace from the traditional 
style I've been living with 
t^ until now. 

I am considering 
modem - or do I mean 
contemporary? I am not 
sure of the diffwence, (f 
there Is any. At any rater / 
am interested in clean 
sophisticated lines and de- 
sign. My room is large 
enough for a good-sized 
table and chairs plus a 
chest or server. — W.P. 

A. Modern is usually 
more sleek, more extreme 
with straighter lines and 
plays on the theatrical and 
dramatic. Contemporary 
is softer and usually more 
easily combined with 
other poriods of furnish- 
ings including traditional 
and antiques. 

When you create a 
modem or contemporary 
room, you're oft^^ung 
sleek, cool materials like 
glass and metal. To add 
warmth to the room, con- 
sider the wall covering, 
furniture fabrics, floor 
coverings and accessories. 
These items play an im- 
portant role and their 
contrasts with the furni- 
ture are what make for 
interest in a room. 

For example, the sleek- 
ness of glass and dirome 
contrasts with a nubby 
linen upholstery fabric 
and a soft wool carpet. 
Foil wallpaper can reflect 
light in-Jnaanestiiig ways 
and complement fresh 
flowers and the sculptural 
quality of large house 
plants. 

So, flrst, I'd select the 
table and chairs in the 
style you prefer and then 
add a server that blends or 
contrasts, as you prefe . 
Then think in terms c. 
dramatic and pleasant 
contrasts — visually and 
texturally. 

Q. We have just added 
on to our living room and 
we are having new carpet- 
— ing put in but we do not 
know what color to get. I 
have a long tan sofa, two 
matching blue chairs, a 
gold foot stool and two 
basket-type chairs. — A. 
F. 

A. You have a nieutral 
sort of color scheme estab- 
lished in your room with 
the tan, blue and gold in 
your upholstery so you 
could select from a num- 
ber of different neutral 
tones for your carpeting. 
Depending on the kind 
of look you'd like in your 
room — formal or infor- 
mal, modem or tradi- 
^ tional — you might like a 
light brown tone, or a 
brown and beige combina- 
tion, or even a beige and 
oatmeal mixture. 

Still another option 
might be a soft rust color 
which goes beautifully 
with tans and blues and 
golds. If you did use a rust 



colored carpeting, it might 
be attractive to add a 
irinted fabric that con* 
tains your upholstery 
colors and the rust. There 
are a number of rust 
combinations available 
today in fabrics and they 
are extremely good* 
looking. 

Q. We are planning to 
move to a nearly-new 
mob^i home in Tidewater 
tM has honey-colored 
carpeting throughout and 
light pecan paneled walls. 
The living room and den 
have only a slight divider 
and newel-type posts. The 
dining room is open to the 
living room, so it all has a 
very open feeling. 

Our first choice in 
colors to work with are 
SIM yellow and apricot. 
We are fond of wallpaper 
and can put it up our- 
selves, but don't know if 
we should cover up any 
paneling. Our first prior- 
ity will have to be having 
furniture reupholstered. 

We have two couches 
(one for the living room, 
one for the den) and half a 
dozen upholstered chairs. 
The dining room set (wal- 
nut) also has upholstery 
on chair seats and backs. 
How should we go 
about this plan? — E.E. 

A. The color of carpet- 
ing you have and the walls 
in your new mobile home 
xShcudd^work well with, 
your choice of yellow and 
apricot. 

For your, Unng room* 
why not sdM%}ricot fo^ 
a pair of chairs and a gay 
print of sunny yellow, 
apricot, honey, soft green 
and white (if there were 
additional colors that 
would be all right) for 
your sofa. Dining chairs in 
an apricot, yellow and 
green stripe would be 
pretty and you could ac- 
cessorize with any of the 
colors. 

If your den opens off 
the living room you could 
utilize the same color 
scheme and vary the 
emphasis of the colors. 

When you select fab- 
rics, ask to see books with 
companion or coordinated 
designs. Fabric manufac- 
turers offer already co- 
ordinated fabric — seve- 
ral plain, some stripes, 
plaids, small and large 
florals and gecMnetrics. 

If you feel you would 
like wallpaper, why not 
start with the kitchen and 
bathroom? Then if you 
feel you want more, you 
can consider wallcovering 
for the living room or den. 
If you desire some wall- 
paper, there's nothing 
wrong with covering up 
some paneling. Just check 
your wallpaper retailer for 
proper materials to use as 
an undercoating so you 
will diminate the depres- 
sions in the paneling. 

Flewe arad qocstloBS 
for Decor Score to this 
Bcwa|Mper. 



It's so any. . .advotne the 
things you no longer need in the 
ctassified columni of your 
hometown newipMiwr. In 
practiorily no tee at aH, people 



in your nci^riwrtMod wffl know 
what you have to sdl. You're on 
the road to extra cuh. . . 
soncbody will read your ad and 
buy! 



CUSTOM GARAGES 

Sufff to your tptMcathnt 

AiumJuyiii and Vinyl Siding 
40V«arGiMrefltee 
lAiNNTIONS 



FKE 

CSTMilTCS 



1590 N. NNLITAIIY NWY., MORFOLN 
8S3-2S21 




Heacfr real estate 

Apartment modes 

Designing for one-room living 



A good nix to acconpHslied handsomely in this room where glass, ckronc aad foil 
arc complemented by soft carpeting, upholstery fabric and flowers and pbuits. Foil 
wallpaper to by Van Lult. 



By LESLIE AYERS 

With the price of apart- 
ments on the rise, many 
ire finding the only living 
arrangement they can 
afford is a one-room or 
studio-style iipartment. 

This cidls for adaptabi- 
lity in making your furni- 
ture and lifestyle conform 
to the restraints of living 
in a single room. O'e 
thing it calls for is plpa- 
ning. 

Begin by evaluating 
how to use the space by 
considering what activities 
you'll be using the room 
for. If you entertain quite 
a bit in your apartment, 
you'll want to allocate the 
most spade for seating and 
dining and a lesser area 
for sleeping. 

The sleeping area, 
whether large or small, 
should be mtuie as incon- 



spicuous as possible. One 
logical sohitlon is the sleep 
sofa. There ure many well- 
designed versions of these 
convertible sofas on the 
market. Invest in a good 
one which will provide a 
more comfortable bed. 

Several companies offer 
jgood-lookiog "bed in a 
cupboard" units. 

The bed folds up for 
storage during the day. 
These compact units also 
provide droi>-leaf tables 
for dining and some 
much-needed storage 
space. The units may be 
somewhat tall and bulky, 
but if you have the space, 
they should be a deflnite 
consideration for studio 
apartment dwellers. 

If you need extra seat- 
ing for entmaining, check 
into the many new and 
attractive folding chairs. 



These can be stored in a 
closet when they are not 
bdng used. The new styles 
and colors make them 
more good looking than 
the older-style bridge table 
(hmn. 

If you are u%ng the 
standard twin bed, place it 
i^ainst the wall and add 
bolsten. It will ser\« the 
dual purpose of a sitting 
and sleeping area. Instead 
of a bedspread, find a 
cover that is both fitted 
uid tailored. You can give 
it a softer appearance by 
adding toss pillows. 

The new component 
units and hi*tech furni- 
ture can be especially 
pracitcal and «cciting for 
one-room apartments. 



"raBioNTo-pnaoN- 

Tkat'a Osl -Ton m»i Toar 
LOCAL N«wapap*r 



More on home maintenance •'- avoiding plumbing pitfalls 



By UN J. COOPER 



TMraMv lalMm AwxtaUM 



Although warm weather is still with us, it won't be 
much longer before homeowners may be faced with one 
of the most annoying and irritating of home 
maintenance problems ~ frozen pipes. Today's column 
offers some advance, clip-out-and-save, information on 
what to do if your pipes freeze this winter. Also 
included are other basic plumbing facts and tips . 

Intake valves. You and your family should become 
familiar with the various water supply intake valves in 
your plumbing system. A good practice is to label each 
one with a shipping or luggage tag. You will rarely need 
to use them, but in the event of an emergency or if you 
need to make minor repairs, they will be easier to locate. 
Intake valves for toilets are usually under the water 
chamber; those for sinks are often under 4he sinki^md 
the main intake valve is usually near the point at which 
the water enters the house. 

Leak»iJQflOPWt«iiitsi«heuld lasti t^e lifetime of the 
house, but if et jwnt should loosen. It mil need tp be 
resoldered ~ a job requiring an acetylene torch and best 
left to a plumber. Plastic pipe shoiild last the lifetime of 
the house, too, and a loose joint in plastic pipe should 
also be handled by a plumber. 

If your washing machine, dishwasher, or other water- 
using appliance appears to leak, check first to be sure 
that the trap through which it drains is completely open. 
Sometimes a partially clogged drain can cause an 
overflow within the appliance. 

Noisy pipes. Noise in the pipes can be caused by a 
variety of problems; among the most common are a 
worn washer, a loose part in a faucet, and steam in the 
hot water pipe. The condition causing noisy pipes 
should be corrected promptly because sometimes the 
noise is accompanied by vibration. A strong vibration 
can cause the fittings to loosen and leak. 

Frozen pipes. If a pipe should freeze, proper 
defrosting may prevent damage from occurring. The 
pipe must be thawed slowly to prevent formation of 
steam which could burst the pipe. The first step is to 
restor^beat to the affected part of the house. 

The pipe is most likely to be on an outside wall 
exposed to winter winds. Open all faucets connected to 
the line so that steam can escape if any forms during 
thawing. Begin the thawing at the frozen point nearest 
the faucet. (A thermometer held against an exposed pipe 
helps to locate this point.) A heat lamp set at least six 
inches from a plasterboard or panel-type wall will thaw 
the pipes behind it. In some houses the baseboard panel 
can be ronoved and the nozzle of a hair dryer inserted 



• IPrrERmit • EXTERIOR 

• INSURED • GUARANTEED 




O^j 



John German Remodeling 

•STIPPLED CEILINGS 

• GUTTERS • KrrCHENS 

• CONVERSIONS • ROOFS 

• INSULATION • AIR A POWER VENTS • SIDING 



• mi If TIMATIfl 

SyiSVirflliilM •rtvs 




41t-MU 



TOP SALESMAN 
AUGUST 



AVMJIHJ 



JIMCOCNRANEC.R.S. 

4Sl-3i03ll«t. 
420-3120 Office 




Notes from the 
shelter industry 




Free Enterprise 
REALTY 

> SAVE 1 T0 3'o' 

TOM GROVES Bus. 468-2S()n 
BROKER Res. 467-150! 



3460 HOLl ANDRO. 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 23452 



with the exhaust directed parallel to the pipes. A hair 
dryer or heat lamp is also suitable for defrosting 
exposed pipes. Again, the air from the hair dryer should 
be directed paraUel with the pipes. 

A regular cloUNi^ iron (set on warm) or a soldering 
iron may be strapped to an exposed pipe for safe 
thawing, but be absolutely sure that either iron touchy 
ronlythepiper-^ - 

As the pipe thaws, move the source of heat toward the 

frozen part until the job is completed. If a sink trap is 

invQhwd, boying wMcr poured into it may solve the 

See HOME MAIfhEi^ANCE. pdgef 




BAY AREA REALTY 

Totat€oTnmissioir 

f (INSTANTTiJIA-RKEtlNG WfTH 

METR^MLS) 
CO-BROKE WITH ALL AGENTS 
(TO^X, To Staling Agent) 
FREE COMPUTER ANALYSIS 
V BUYER PROTECTION PLAN 
r FULL ADVERTISEMENT 
ACTION WARRANTY 

CALL 467-0200 

(After Sept, 15. call new. number: 499-8984) 



FULLSKRVKK 
RKALTOR 



(1 



Rrof Mt yom hn/wtumatl See one of tteee /eadina »•• ReaMon/ 

You can trust a Realtor! 

House 
of the week 





lb 



Taylor Brothers 
l^alty Co. 

Pa^T^fler.lraliM- 
3t04TYIIINieiCII0AD 



4S4-4542 




RiCARDO 

ItoALTY 

Phone 847-4588 

$89,900 

SOUTH QF 
GREAT BRIDGE 

ON HICKORY ROAD aSirfetBrLfflaOs 



to tftt Mmv< of eiMt Afi^ 
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OmmpmIi*, Vs. 23»0 

847-4888 



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.l*.'Ot* 



MLS 



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VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 12. !>?> 



Time to plan winter storage for yoiir glads and dahlias 



By PATRICK DENTON 



Depoiding on how early and how severe the winter 
will be in Virgil Anch. it is tbM to start thinking 
about lifting your gladiola (xtxxM and dahlia roots for 
winter storage. In cold winter areas of the continent, 
they indeed must be lifted to prevent their bdng 
destroyed through freezing. In mild winter areas, 
dahlias ap«cially are prone to rot if the winter is a wet 
one. 

So whatever way you look at it, it is safn- to dig them 
up and store them. And worthwMle too, for few 
lutings deliver the decorative impact of the bright and 
exotic dahlia and |^ blopms. 

Olads should be dug before a hard frost in cold areas, 
and before the so^y f*"" of milder areas. Once they 
are dug, the foliar diould be cut off straight-away, 
close to the corm. This immMUate cutting is to prevent 
any thrips from diving down through the stons into the 
conns. In fact, some experts advoate cutting and 
destroying the tops even before the corms are dug. 

The digging, by the way, should be done when 
weather and soil are on the dry side. The drying and 
curing of the glad «>rms is made easier by these dry 
conditions. 

When they are first dug, the ^diola corms can be 
laid out on a dry surface, such as a sidewalk, to begin 




Backyard 
gardener 



the drying if the weather is nice and warm. Then they 
can be taken indoors to finish off the drying process, 
placed just one layer deep in a box in a warm, well- 
ventilated room. 

Once the corms are dried enough to clean up, they can 
be storedjfll the spring. Below each corm you will see a 
shrivded-up dried blob which is the spent corm from the 
past season. It wiU pry away easily when the buU) is 
dried enough. Remove it, and any dried brown tiaaue. 
Store the corms shallowly in brown bags. Shake tihem 
up with a bit of sulfur flour first to discourage any pests 
or diseases that still might be lingering. 

Storage should be cool, dark and dry — a cold room 
is ideal. 

Dahlias are a little trickier to store — they, too, 
should be cut off before digging the root. Then dwy 



Lawn & garden 



Chrysanthemums are gloiious autumn flowers 



« 




Chrysanthonums, the tf ory of autunm and the 
footbidl season, have a fasdiuuing history. Although 
they were mentioned by Conf^us about 500 B.C., they 
have bera grown in the U.S. tot only about 180 years. 

The ^hr^anthmumi tnigkuted in China and was 
introduiied into Japan in the fourth century A.D. In 
1688, a few plants wore brought by ship masters and 
tradm around UnCKpt of Good Hope to Europe. The 
plants died and no ftttther import^ons woe made for a 
full(»itury. 

In 1789. one lonely {dant survived the long voyage 
from China to fnoot, and the chrysanthemum became 
establbhed in Burt^. The long, warm summer of 
Marseilles was ideal for iu growth. Cuttings and 
divisions were soM and within a few years an ochibit of 
a hundred plants was held in Paris. This fine flower was 
now well launched in the western world. 

In 1798, John Sevens of New Jers^ introduced the 
first chrysanthemums into Ammca. In those days, 
gardening was a fashiomble hobby of wealthy people. 
It was during this period, also, that flower sbows were 
l>ecomiiyp^|0N|»r,^d,9t^^j49N Wd hgticHlturil 
ipcBiies wwe wiiv iwgapnniBu , . . , 
— In thifr ^wifOHflw^T the dirysantheroum gained in 
popularity and importance as a flower for home gardens 
and for commordil i^oduction. Many professional and 
amateur gardeners devoted their skill to this plant and 
contributed to the develoiHnent of better varietia. 

A very important devdopment in 1923 was the use of 
wild species from Korea by Alex Cumming of 
Connecticut to produce the Korean Hybrids which are 






hardy enough to endure cold winters. We now have 
blooms of many sizes and types and a wide variety of 
colors to satisfy the needs of every gardener. 

Chrysanthemums thrive best in a sunny location. If 
grown in partial shade, the plants have a tendency to 
become spindly and the lower leaves are apt to shrivel 
and turn brown. 

A light, rich, well-drained soil is consider^ ideal for 
chrysanthemums. The plants are notoriously heavy 
feeders and require abundant quantities of plant food if 
they are to attain their maximum development. 

Mums make their maximum growth during hot 
weather, and throughout this period they require a 
liberal supply of moisture. If the plants suffer a serious 
check at any time during this period of their growth, it 
will often result in a loss of the lower leaves which 
seriously injures the general appearance of the plant. 

The pinching back of the plants, which is someti mes 
spoken of as summer pruning, is a factor of great 
importance in the culture of garden chrysanthemimM. 
After, three or four pairs of Icavas have formed, the 
growing tip of the ^boot should be pinched back. From 
three to five side shoots will then develop and these, in 
turn, should^*1)e pinched back to induce further 
branching. 

Barly-flowering varieties should be pinched before 
the middle of July and late-flowering types should not 
be pinched after the early part of August. If summer 
pruning is neglected, the plants will assume a spindly 
habit of growth, and they will produce little bloom. 



HOME MAINTENANCE 



from page 6 

problon. Small cooktaig appUaiuxs oui be set under 
horizontal |»pes but be sure the appliance does not 
touch the pipe. You can ateo rent a heating cable to 
wrap around the pipe. If a lar^ amount of pipe is 
involved or if ui^grouiul i^pe is frozen, odl the 
plumber. He has equipment for thawing pipes 
dectrically. 

Of course the best solution to the problem of frozen 
pipes is prevention. In cold dimates be sure oawl-space 
(^>eninp are dosed during the winta. Never leave a 



house without heat during cold weather. During an 
extended period of severe cold provide at least a little 
heat for unused rooms and baths that are not geno-ally 
heated. Ordinary antifreeze will provide protection for 
toilets and drain pipes, but it cannot be used in the water 
distribution pipes. 



should be plac^ cut stem downward and hosed off. 
Hiey should be dried in that position for several hours 
befmv Storing. ^ 

Some people like to cut down the foliage as soon as a 
frost hits, with plans to lUg the dahlia roots later. 
Unfortunately, water runs down the hdlow stem and 
begins to rot the mou by the time they ve dug up. So 
the two opCTations should be done together. 

Once tiie dahlia ropts are dried, they are ready for 
storage. For dahlias, the trick in keeping them over the 
winter is to maintain them dry enough that they do not 
mildew and rot, but damp enough that they do not 
shrivel up. 

Hoe is a method that is easy and works for me. I use 
plastic bags large enough to house the root comfortably. 
Place a layer of peat moss in the bottom of the bag. 
Dampoi it just a little. Thta place the dahlia root, again 
stem downwwd, on the peat, and «dd some more peat, 
n<M quite covering the whole root. 

Close the plastic bag, then puncture it in several 
places along its top. From time to time during the 
printer, open the bags and fed the roots. If they are 
becoming a bit dried, sprinkle them with a bit of water, 
jif they are a bit damp, leave the ba^ open for a bit. 

As for glads, the storage place should be dark, dry 
and cool. 



Directories for pick- 
your-own apples now 

available from VDACS 

Fall means apple harvest time and the early varieties 
are coming in now. To help consumers take advantage 
of this year's very good crop, the Virginia Department 
of Agriculture and Consumer Services has just 
published three updated directories for pick-your-own 
apples. 

The directories list those partidpating growers in the 
areas of Amherst-Nelson Counties, Northern Virginia 
and Roanoke. The ordiards are offering dther pick- 
your-own or fresh-picked apples in such popular 
varieties as: Red and Golden DeUdous, Winesap, York, 
Rome and Stayman. Several outlets are also selling fresh 
apple dder and apple butter and even have picnic 
facilities available. Ilus is a once a year opportunity to 
purchase fresh, juicy apples ^rect from the orchard 
whUe they are at their p«dc in flavor and crispness, and 
to enjoy a family outing in the countryside as well. 

Free copies of the directory for your area may be 
obtained by writing Apples, VDACS, 203 North 
Governor Street, Richmond, VA 23219 or by caUiilg 
(804)786-3951. ' \ ' ' 

Virginia's apple crop will be only slightly smalleii t^n 
last year's, mostly due to fewer GridtmDdKieus.VThe 
harvest will continue tliroiigh ^tettber ttifl'flnish on 
late varieties about the end of October, accord ing to 
VDACS fruits nurketing agent, Chartes C. Mayes. 

Consumer demand for apples is expected to be high. 
Besides the evn-popular apple pie, this favorite fruit 
can be used as an excdlent and economical snack food, 
as other snack foods have jumped in price. Apples are a 
good source of quick energy since the natural fruit 
sugar, fructose, is more readily absorbed into the system 
than refined sugar. 

And the old saying, "An apple a day keeps the doctor 
away" is no idle proverb. Raw ^)ples can help in 
combating intestinal disorders, for they provide natural 
"bulk" and aid in digestion. The apple has also been 
referred to as "nature's toothbruch" because it cleans 
the teeth and massages the gums. 

So, whether you eat them raw, bake 'em, or apple-pie 
'em, now is the time to buy 'em.. .fresh, juicy Virginia 
apples. 



BURTON STATION 

from page 1 

Ken Scott said that the funding for the expansion is 
expected in three years and the extension will be 
completed in five years. 

Hanbury said a lot of people in Burton Station have 
not been allowed expansion of residential use. The dty 
is going to try to see if those who remdin will be granted 
FHA loans, he said. 



Monday thru Saturday 
8 a.in. • S p.m. 



INTEBE8TS EVEBVONE 

The varied cootcott of your 
hometown newipapar give it a 
readership that indhides every 
aaegroiv. 



ALARMS 

fivm page J 
Department would. 

In a related action. City 
CouncU an^roved an or- 
dinance which {»t)hibits 
tying alarm systems into 
any of the dty's public 
safdy tdephone numbCTS. 

Hanbury said that maiqr 
dtizens have purdiasiKl 
aut(nnatic tdt^hone dial- 
ing equipment ud i»o- 
gnunmed ftdr td e iAotws 
to dial the dty's emer- 
gency communictations 
numbers. He said, how- 
ever, that these devices ue 
mx foolproof and lull the 
usos into a false sense of 
security. He added diat 
private mmutoring ser- 
vkes are availaMc. 




for all your 
Landscaping 

Tills /sdto Time to 

Man anil Beautify 

YowLawn 

LAWN AND GARDENING 
RB40VATI0NS 

6raili« • F«HMrt« 

SMiRiig • Plantkigof Shnibt 

DtiigiM 

FnEEEsnmAns 

497-8906 



umm uimwnia. 



DO YOUR BK EUCmC 

EARUT-ORUdL 



I :< 



jf^^'^ 





Uw 



wrap «kt« Ift Mrarai 
al 






The weekday hoiirs 
between 10 A.M. md 10 P.M. 
are the "ix*ak load" hours for 
Vejx'o, when the most elec- 
tricity is lx'in.u iist\, i)y our 
customers and tin* chance of 
shortages is gieatest. 

i^ ) tr\' to restrid )'i air use 
( )f iiwn>r appliances and Iiot 
water during these lioui's. 
1>> .\t»ur Ixiking ami laundiy 
M( re \i ) AM. Turn < >n the 
dishwasher just before >'«>u w) 
tolH.^y-HAverlx'tm* 10 A.M. 



or after 10 P.M. You won't 
be using less energy, but 
youll be using it when 
Vepa) has powerto spare, 
And that will reduce 
the n^ to build oostiy 
power plants. 

You can also take 
these two big energy- 
saving steps. First.set 
vi)ur lK)nie air condition- 

ingat78°orhigher,or 

not more than 15° ax)ler than 
the temperature outside. Sec- 
ond, don't ovenwrk your water 
lieater. Use the dishwasher 
iind washing niiichine only for 
full kKKkaiw wash dothes in 
ax»l water instead of hot. 
By f<4k>wing these tips, 

S)ull lie keeping ytair power 
lis dowa and helping us all 
make it through the summer 
without power short^^s. 




edawood 



GARDEN CENTER I 

1806 E. Little Creek Road 
587-4481 



AZALEA SPECIAL 



SYR. OLD HEALTHY 
AND HEARTY 

Bloom in the 
Spring 

RED^MMND 



OuMtofrarittiM 



5 F0R*12*« 

Rog. $2.95 ea. SAVE $2.28 
By buying five. 




4 



DWARF CREPE ^50 
MYRTLE * 



GERBERA DAISY 
In I 



HARDY GARDEN MUMS 'LSSandup 
ADoiMVari*«M 3 for •4.50 



UNDScare 

CONSULTATION 



FREE!! 

Please feel free to stop in, bring us a picture or a sketch 
with some dimen»ions. Our staff will advise you as to wMch 
plants wouid b« most desirable and show you the quality 
and different sizes we have available on the premises. 

Large Undscape size plants-Hellies-JiinipM^ 



Vispco 



Virginia Beach's own newspaper 

PIckupafeopy 
^^f the SUN 

Get extra copies of the Virginia 

Beach SUN at the following list 

of newsstands located throughout 

the Virginia Beach area: 

NORTHHAMPTON BLVD. AREA 

Norfolk Airport 

Lake Wright Motel 

Holiday Inn 

SHORE DRIVE AREA 

Big Star (Bayside Shop. Ctr.) 

McCoy Pharmacy 

Seashore State Park 

Farm Fresh (Great N«ck Square) 

HILLTOP AI^I'A 

General Hosp. of Va. Beach 

Peoples (Hilltop Shop. Ctr.) 

Food Fair (Hilltop Shop. Ctr.) 

OCEAN FRONT AREA 

Peoples (Laskin Rd.) 

Big Star (Laskin Rd.) 

7-11 (32 nd St.) 

Fireside News (Pacific Ave.) 

Mariner Motel (Atlantic & 57th) 

HolMay Inn (Atlantic A 57th) 
Holiday Irni (Atiantk Ave. A 39th) 

Hilton Inn 

Sheraton Inn 

Ingram's Phamiacy (25th) 

Post Office I 

News Center | 

Barr's Pharmacy | 

KOA Camra;roiind | 

Travel Park | 

LONDON BRIDGE AREA | 

A &P(Klngs Shopping Ctr.) 1 

Giant (Lymriiaven Rd.) | 

Va. Beach Sun BMg. i 

MunAw DriHE Store I 

PLAZA-GREENRUN-PEMBROKE AREA^ 

Peoples -Plaza Shopping Ctr. -i 

Peoples - Pemliroke Shopping MaN | 

7-11 (Lynnshores Dr. A NoHand Rd.) 1 

Big Star (Holland Rd.) | 

KEMPSVILLEAREA 1 

Farm Fresh (Arrowtioad Siiep. Ctr.) | 

COURTHOUSE AREA 1 

711 S 

COLLEGE PARK AREA | 

BoLo's (indtan River Rd. A MBt N«y.) | 

Peoples (Celiege Parti S^wNf 1 







* *flMJP»# I, till AlA&l 5 S -5 S- J| 



' ' ' 5 ! ' ' '" f ' ' ' ' ■■■■Ill '!■ r ■■'■'"'■??' j; ,! J i. "'5 ?;' ■'■;;■ i J j J u I ipii ■ p ■ pp 



mnm 



M 



8 VIRGINIA BEACH SUN D WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 12, 1979 



Vii^iiiia Beach 



notices 



Virginia: In the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach 

Leona R. Payton, 

Complainant, 

vs. 

Shirley O'Neil Paytop, 

and 



David 
infant, 

and 



Roger Clark 
ififant, 

and 

Vicki Lynn 
infant. 



7401 Joy Drive, Gautier, 
Mississippi, it is ordered 
that Johnnie Earl Siler do 
appear on or before tWe' 
17th 'of October, 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

Acopy-Veste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 

Hary J. Hicks, p.q. 

4316-C Virginia Beach 

Blvd. 

Va. Beach, Va. 



Payton, an 8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



Alan Payton, an 



Payton, an 



and 

Michael O'Neil Payton, 

Defendants. 

NOTICE OF HEARING 

The object of this suit is 
for the Complainant to 
establish, by satisfactory 
evidence, that Shirley 
O'Neil Payton, her 
husband, is deceased 
based upon a presumption 
of death arising from the 
fact that Shirley O'Neal 
Payton has been absent 
uninterrupted years and 
has not been heard from 
since his original 
disaifpearance on August 
18, 1971. 

• Pursuant to Section 
64.1-105 et. seq. of the 
Code of Virginia, ord?r of 
publication has been 

published for .(ojir ,C4X, 
successive .weeks, in. the. 
Virginia Beach Sun, 
ending on June 20, 1979. 
Therefore, pursuant to 
Section 64.1-108 of the 
Code of Virginia, notice is 
hereby giv^en that on 
October 12, 1979, a day 
more than two weeks after 
this advertisement, a 
hearing will be held in the 
Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, at 
which the Court will hear 
evidence concerning the 
alleged absence of the 
supposed decedent and the 
circumstances and 
duration thereof. 

Leona R. Payton 

By: James B. Lonergan 

Of Counsel 

James B. Lonergan, 

Esquire 

Smith, . Dickerson & 

Home 

Holland Plaza Office 

Bldg., Suite 127 

41 76 South Plaza Trail 

Virginia Beach, VA 23452 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 22nd day of August, 
1979. 

Annie R. Siler, Plaintiff, 
against Johnnie Earl Siler, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of one years 
separation. 

And an affldavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the Suic of 
Virginia, the last known 
post offiM address bang 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
24th day of August, 1979. 

In re: Adoption of Keasha 
Arlentheia Daniels 

In Chancery #C-79- 1625 

By: James Russell Waike 
and Michelle Walke, 
Petitioners 

To: Edward Keith Taylor 
375 Greenleaf Drive 
Norfolk, Va. 

ORDER 

This day came James 
Russell Walke and 
Michelle Walke, 
Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of tlys proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, 
Keasha Arletheia Daniels, 
by '']itth«ir'>RM»R*<W)dkt^' 
and Mmim€^Wknc,' 
husband and wife, and 
"Sfttdavit having been 
made and filed that 
Edward Keith Taylor, a 
natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia and 
that due diligence has been 
used by or in behalf of the 
said Petitioners to 
ascertain in which County 
or corporation the said 
natural parent is, without 
effect, the last known post 
office address being: 375 
Greenleaf Drive, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Edward Keith 
Taylor appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 



A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Marc Jacobson, p.q. 
6663 Stoney Point South 
Norfolk, Va. 23502 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



VlRCilNlA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON 
THE 14TH DAY OF 
AUCOST. 1979. 

In re: Adoption of James 
Ronald Greenhill, III and 
Jennifer Lyne Greenhill 

4 

In Chancery #C-79- 1489 

By: Ronald Phillip Reed 
and Laura Dunn Greenhill 
Reed Petitioners 

To: James Ronald 



Greenhill, Jr. 
330 Village Drive 
Virginia Beach, Va. 



ORDER 

This day came Ronald 
Phillip Reed and Laura 
Dunn Greenhill Reed, 
Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant(s), 
James Ronald Greenhill, 
III and Jennifer Lyne 
Greenhill, by Ronald 
Phillip Reed and Laura 
Dunn Greenhill Reed, 
husband and wife, and 
affidavit having been 
made and filed that Jamr 
Ronald Greoihill, Jr., a 
natural parent of said 
child(ren), is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
330 Village Drive, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 

It is hercfore Ordered 
that me said James 
Ronald Greenhill, Jr. 
appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order 
and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
matter. 

A copy teste: 

Rexford R. Cherryraan, 
4606 Westgrove Court 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23455 



8/22,8/29,9/5,9/12 



In re: Adoption of Victor 
Manuel Gonzalez 
Herrera, Minor Boy 

In Chancery #C-79-1622 

By: Jose /f^iiro Gonzalez 
A Ana ^Bchenique 
Conzaln, Petitioners 

To: Ana Rosa Herrera 
CaUellNo.1342 
Bogota, Colombia 

ORDER 

This day came Jose 
Arturo Gbnzalez and Ana 
Janet Echenique 
Gonzalez, Petitioners, and 
and represented that the 
object of this proceeding 
is to effect the adoption of 
the above named 
infant(s), Victor Manuel 
Gonzalez Herrera, by Jose 
Arturo Gonzalez and ^a 
Janet Echenique 
Gonzalez, husband and 
wife, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Ana Rosa Herrera, a 
natural pareiU of said 
child, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the 
last known f>ost office 
address being: Calle 11 
No. 1342, Bogota, 
Colombia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Ana Rosa 
Herrera appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. h 



proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
Deputy Clerk 



Commonwealth 
Virr'flia 



In re: Michael Paul Meier 
Michelle nmi^Meier 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 



Of Doumar; Pincus, Knight Va. Beach, Va. 23452 
and Harlan, p.q. 

1350 Virginia National 8/22,8/29,9/5,9/12 
Bank Bldg. . 

Norfolk, Va. '. 



Richard J. Tavss, p.q. 
P.O. Box 3747 
Norfolk, Va. 23514 

8/29,9/5,9/1^,9/19 



\ 



•UilUO^ 



ia M' 



In the Clerk's Office 
the Circuit Court of the^ 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 21st day of August, 
1979. ^ 

Ray Edward Bragg, 
Plaintiff, against Lynn 
Esther Bragg, Defendant: 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii (a 
divorce from the bond of 
matrimony) from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of separation 
lasting for a period of 
more than one year \xnda 
the provisions of Section 
20-91(9) of the Code of 
Virginia (1950) as 
amended. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
150 Valeside N.W. 
Massillon, Ohio 44646, it 
is ordered that Lynn 
Esther Bragg do aftpui on 
or before the 11th of 
October, 1979, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy-Teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
Deputy Clerk 

Theodore A. Boyce, p.q. 

P.O. Box 2193 

Va. Beach, Va. 23452 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



A copy teste: 
-^„^ John V. Fentress, Clerk 
. ,.RaynkiBd;?Winfijovka»n^ 
of Dq>utyaerk 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
22aifday of August, 1979. 



Tom C.Smith, p.q; 
2604 Pacific Avenue 
Va. Beach. Va., 23451 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
22nd day of August, 1979. 

In re: Adoption of 
Danielle Sassone and 
change of name to 
Danielle Barth 

In Chancery #C-79-1328 

By: Gary R. Barth and 
Cynthia H. Barth, 
Petitioners. 

To: Daniel A. Sassoon 
71 Illinois Street 
Rochester, New York 
14609 

ORDER 

This day came Gary R. 
Barth and Cynthia ^. 
Barth, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this |»-oceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant 
Danielle Sassone, and 
change of name to 
Danielle Barth, by Gary 
R. Barth and Cynthia H. 
Barth, husband wife, and 
affidavit having been 
made and filed that Daniel 
A. Sassoon, a natural 
iwrent of saki child, is a 
non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 71 Illinois Street, 
Rochester, New York 
14609. 

It is thaefore Ordered 
that the said IHmid A. 
Sassoon appear before 
this Court within ten (10) 
days tftet publication of 
this OdCT and indioite his 
attitude toward the 



In the Oerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
Qty of Virginia Beach, on 
the 28th day of August, 
1979. 

Carl Ernest Mason, 
Plaintiff, against Anna 
Elizabeth Mason, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of more than 
one year's separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the state of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
7^ Ridge Drive, Mantua, 
hiew Jersey 08051, it is 
ordered that . Anna 
Elizabeth Mason do 
appear on or before the 
I9th of October. 1979, 

nei^sary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 



The object of this 
proceeding is the 
termination of the residual 
parental rights of Patricia 
Ann Meier and Paul John 
Meier to their children, 
Michael Paul Meier & 
Michelle mnm Mejfir. The 
consequences of 
termination of residual 
parental rights are that a 
parent or parents forever 
relinquish all parental 
rights such as, but not 
limited to, the rights to 
companionship, associa- 
tion, religious training, 
education, discipline, 
guidance, maintenance 

Uand all decision making 
concerning the children's 
welfare. And further it is 
to commit said infants to 
the care and custody of 
the Virginia Beach 
Department of Social 
Services with the right of 
said agency to consent to 
the infants' adoption. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Patricia Ann Meier and 
Paul John Meier is a 
proper party to this 
proceeding; but due 
diligence has been used to 
ascertain in what county 
or corporation he or she 
is, without effect, it is 
ORDERED that Patricia 
Ann Meier and Paul J5hn 
Meier xio appear here 
within 10 days after due 
publicatiQn he$^f . a^d do 

what mk'^i^t^st^W' 

protect her/his interest in 
this^uit, ., 



Acopy-Te«e: 7 
John V. F4trdl, Clerk 
J, Curtis Frlyl^D.C. 

Robert H. Bennett, p.q. 
3330 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

9/5,9/12,9/19,9/26 



PUBLIC HEARING 

Notice is hereby given 
that the Virginia Beach 
Ci^ Council will hear, for 
recoosideriuion, on Mon- 
day. September 17, 1979, 
at 2r00 p.m., in the Coun- 
cil Chambers, Administra- 
tion Building, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia: 

An ordinance upon appli- 
catitHi of National Pride 
Eqidimient. Inc., for a 
conditional use permit for 
a car wash on certain 
property located on the 
East side of South Witch- 
duck Road beginning at a 
point 170 feet more or less 
south of Brady Court, 
running a distance of 
120.21 feet along the east 
side of South Witchduck 
Road, running a distance 
of 1^.81 feet along the 
southern propoly line, 
running a distance of 
142.88 feet along the 
eastern {»roperty line and 
running a distance of 
240.31 feet along the 
northern ptopaty Une. 
Siud pared oontuns .617 
acre. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

9/5, 9/12 



Virgil^: In the Oerk's 
Office of the Juvenile and 
Domestic Relations 
District 0>urt of the City 
of Vi^nia Boudi, on the 
27th d^ of AugiBt, 1979. 



A Copy Teste: 

Elizabeth E. Henley, 

Clerk 

Kathy S. Brothers. D.C. 

Carolyn Tucker, Va. 
Beach Dept. 

Petitioner of Social 
Services 

Juvenile & Domestic 
Relations District Court 
Municipal Center 
Va. Beach, Va. 23456 

9/5,9/12,9/19,9/26 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 27th day of August, 
1979. 

Horace J. Savage, 
Plaintiff, against Kay 
Linda Savage, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce from 
the bonds of matrimony 
from the said defendant, 
upon the grounds of 
continuous separation in 
excess of one year. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office addre» being 
216 Marion Ave., Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania 17013, it is 
ordered that Kay Linda 
Savage do apprar on or 
before the 2Sth of 
October, 1979, and do 
what may be aaxuvy to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A (»py-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Oerk 

Linda Noel HiU, D.C. 



9/5,9/12,9/19,9/26 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 15th day of August, 
1979. 

Susan Lynn Crovetti, 
Plaintiff, against C79- 
1559 Joseph Anthony 
Crovetti, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of one year 
separation. 

And an affldavit having 
been made and flled that 
the defendant Joseph 
Anthony Crovetti the 
above-named defendants 
last known post offlce 
address is 1751 Oowrie 
Avenue, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, and that due dili- 
gence has been used by 
and on behalf of the 
plaintiff to ascertun fai 
what county or corpora- 
tion the defendant is, 
without effect, it is order- 
ed that Joseph Anthony 
Crovetti do appear on or 
before the 5th of October, 
1979, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in4bis.suit. 
i .bviu rtsfisti eiaisTi / Oi.fi. 
A copy-Tfcstet " - '' 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
Deputy Clerk 

Forest A. Nester, p.q. 

Tidewater Legal Aid 

Society 

3432 Va. Beach Blvd. 

Va. Beach, Va. 23452 

8/22,8/29,9/5,9/12 



In Uie Clerk's Office of , 
the Circuit Court of the 
aty of Virginia sieach, on 
the 17th day of August, . 
1979. 

Ethel M. Harris, Plaintiff, 
against James P. 
McGeein, Principal 
Defendant and Fidelity 
American Bank Co., 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is ' 
to attach real and persona] 
ptopwty Of the principal 
defendant, James P. 
McGeein, and to subject 
same in satisfaction of 
debts due and owhig by 
the said James P. 
McGeein to the plaintiff. 

And an affidavit having 
been nuuie and fil«i that 
the defendant is not a 
resideoft of die Sute of^ 
Virginia* the last Post 
Office address being 4316- 
C Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, it is 
ordered that James P. > 
McOedn. do vppcu here 
within tm, (10) days after - 
due publication hereof, v 
andi~do what f may be 
necemnfr .'to protect his- 
interett^o this suit. 

A copy-Teste: -^ 

Jo(H| Y.F«!l«fiHJJicrk.. .^. 

D.Q. r, li orcf •.-,„"<v..'30 

Jaiofi W* Brazier Jr.TP? 
Levine A Friedman 
160 Newtown Road, Suite 
416 



Virginia Beach. Va. 23462 
8/22,8/»,9/5,9/12 



^ 



In the Qerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 16th day of August, 
1979. 

Robert P. Hobson, 
Plaintiff, against C79- 
1562 Angel M. Hobson, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of Uiis suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of the parties 
having lived separate and 
apart without 

cohabitation and withtwt 
interruptiM tot a period 
in excess of one year. 

And an affklavit 'having 
been made and filed that 
Khe defemlant is not a 
residoit of tlw state of 
Virginia, the last kwmn 
post office addren b^ 
1 1 Burke Street, 
Pasadena, Texas, it is 
ordered that Angel M. 
Hol»on (k> ^qxar cm or 
befcm the fth of Octobo', 
19^, and do what may be 
necessary to i^otect'hcr 
interest in this suit. 

AcoRf-Tesle: 

John V. Feittreis, Ckrk 



&uartR.0(^d<»,p.4. 

Attwney 

P.O. Box 2257 



Virginia: In tiie Clerk's 
Offlce of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
17tiidftyofAiigast.t979. 

In re: Adoption of Minor 
Child Named Robert 
Henry Mason 

In Chancery #C-79-1574 

By: Robert Paul Horwatii 
A Beverlex Kaye I^uiiels 
Mason Horwath, 
PetitionCTS 

to: Quy Kxmey Mason 
General Ddivery 

Elizabethtown. 
Kentucky 

ORDER ' 

lUs day came Robot 
Paul Horwath and 
Beverley Kaye Daniels 
Mason Horwath, 
Petitioners. and 
rq»«saited tiiat the object 
of thte |»t)oeedii4 is to 
^ect tlw wioption of the 
above named infant,^, 
Robert Hennr Mason, by ^ 
R<^)m I^Hd Horwatii and ^ 
Beverley Kaye Daniels 
Maicm Hwwitth. husbai^ 
tad wife, tfid aMdavit ' 
having bera nuule and, 
filed tiiitt Gary Kmney 
htecm, a natural pvoit 
oi trid dbM, to a nm- 
rasdent of the Sou of 
Viriginki. tiw last known 
post ^Ikcaddfw being: 
General Delivery, 
Ettariwdttown, K»tucky. 

that the •tfdOvyKaan^ 
Mai^ 19pm More thk 
Covtwithte Ma (I9 ^s 



^^^^^^^^v« 



^^^w^^^^P" 



mi^^^^^^ 



VWGINU BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 12, 1979 9 



ykrgfaya BMcb Piikttc NattcM coM'd. 



•fttr puMimiM of iMi 
Ord«r Md to^ttMt his 
•ttitttdc toward tilt 
propoMd Mtoptioo, or 
othirwlic do what It 
Moimry to Votact Mi 
teamt in this matter. 

Acopyttita: 
JohnV.Faiitran,C}wk 
J. Curtis F^t,D.C^ 

Tom C. Smith, p.q. 
2f04 Pacific Avtrnie 
ViiiinlaacMi.Va. 3)451 



In the Cl«it'f Qflkt of 
the Ovcuit Court of tha 
^ Qty of Viiiiiiia B«adi, on 
tlH 3lit day of Auvutt 
1979. 

WUliam Frad Waaks. 
PlaipUff, agaiut Oail 
Stciakllbar Waaki. 
Deftadant. 

OROBROF 
PUBUCATiON 

Thaob!i«ctofthiiiuitii 
to obtain a divorce lirom 
GaO SlaiahiiNr Wecki 
oimi the iRNndft of dw 
poctiii have lived Mpaiatc 
ltd i^ait and wiAott 
OcAahilatkm aad widMnrt 
kiteniiVtkm tot a period 
l^owra than one year. 

Aad an afOtevit havfan 
keen made aad AM dmi 
the defflidaal ie t m» 
leddeat of the Stale of 
Vlisbria, tke lait laowa 
poet offloe addram Mat: 
6427 Wakhar Avaaw, 

ASSaiflMBK Ba B^ttHHOVBi ' 

Maryland 21206 it it 



dl Chambwt, Adminittra- 
tiott Bufltfini. ^ginia 
Beach, Viriiiiia: 

The ^qilicttlon of Laun 
C. Ademt toi a free- 
itaadfaif mobile hcmie, 
2340 HoBand Road, (near 
KeUam Hlfb School), in 
the Princeit Anne 
Borough. 

9/12 



In tiw Clolc's Office of 
the Orcuk Court of the 
aty of Virpinia Beach, on 
the 6th day of September. 
1979. 

Diane Dean Shelton. 
Phdntiff, agafaist John 
Shawn Shdton, Defend- 
ant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The(ri)ject of thit suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vincuto matrimmnii from 
the said defoidant upon 
the grounds of one year 
M^Nuration. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendutt it a noh- 
rcaident of the State of 
Virginia, the latt know 
pott of^ address being: 
c/9 Ooieral Delivery, At- 
lanta, Georgia it is 
ordered that John Shawn 
Shdbcm do $pSfeu on or 
befwe the 30th of Octo- 
ber, 1979, and do what 
may be necessary to pro- 
tect Us interest in this suit. 

A copy-Tette: 




Frank p i*ntw, in 
7l0M 2420 Vir^nia Beach BNd. 
^CTVinlnia Beach.^^ Vbginia 
to 23454 
tkii^ 



Acopy^TaMa: 
PUIp& 
BoavdofniriaBalldtag 
Noifbik. VliiUn 

9/12. 9/l». ^/36. 10/3 



NOnCB 

Tike Mttaa tkat OB Sip* 
tenbir IS. If79 at UkOQ 
ajM. « the llrmit Mpa •£ 
Bnner Mefc toe. 1100 
LaakiaRondVh|kriii.VA 
234S4. laanv Biiclc be. 
wBlMitatpaUicaactioB, 
fof caih, l ea ervii i i oalo 
i|adftheri|hiloWdbdw 
feBowhif moMf w hi clr 

1979 Bttiafc Uecta 



Biildt tac OMV 



9/12. 9/19. 9/26, 10/3 



In the OeriE's Office of 
the OfOiit Court of the 
dty of Vktfaiia Beach, on 
thefth day of Sqitember, 
1979. 

Sandra P. Lewis, nain- 
tiff, againat RandaU C. 
Lewis, Drfendam. 

ORDER OF 
PUBUCATION 

The object of this suit is 
to <M>tidn a divorce a 
vinculo nuttrimooB bom 
the said defendaitt. upon 
Uie grounds of one year 



7317 



9/12 



NOTICE 



Aad an alBdavtt having 
beta made and ffled that 
the dfffndanf is a non- 
reaidcitt of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
poet office address bdng: 
451 West Broadway. 
^MTtmoit 17, Eugene, 
Orefim it is ordered that 
Raadall C. Lewis do 
q^ew on or befon the 
30th of October. 1979, 
mid do a^iat may be 
neonMry to protect his 
kttenM in Oris suit. 



the Brody iJMitty 

RmadMaoa to awHiMe ^ oo^F^Teste: 

for hmHatioi tt 2in 

Beach, ViRgUt. Mead^r 
thm^MdayAan^ 
a.ai.to4;30pjB. 



hOclmdWi^nePrke 
dS^MfwttnvnRoad 
Norfoft, Virginia 23502 



9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3 



Foaadatfoa 
1/12 



PUBLiClBAin>» 

NooBe ii IMN^ glwia 
tfmt tfw m^aii Baaah 
tilar 



17,^. 



hi the Clark's Oitkx of 
tha Ctoeuit Court erf the 
aQPorVirghdaBeaeh.oa 
the Ml day of September, 
1979. 

^fbara Bratford Arm- 
fenaat, PtmattfT. agahitt 
D. AnabrMt, De- 



ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii frmn 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of one (1) 
year separation. 
And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defoidant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
Unknown it is ordered 
that Leslie 0. Armlmist 
do tifpeu on (v before the 
31stofOaober. 1979. and 
do what may be necessary 
to protect his interest in 
thissuiL 

A copy-Teste: 

Shames and Byrum 
2145 Oki Greenbrier Road 
Chesapeake, Va. 

9/12, 9/19. 9/26. 10/^ 



In the Qerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
aty of Vffginia Beadi, on 
dw 6th day of September. 
1979. 

Theodore Traylor, Jr., 
Plaintiff, agaiiist Queen 
Victoria Ranison Traylor, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of the parties 
having lived separate and 
apart without cohabita- 
tion and without intomip- 
tion for period in excess of 
one year. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and file^that 
the defendant 4s not a 
reside^Litf ihc'JState of 
Virgima. the hut known 
post office address being 
1761 Clifton Avenue, 
Springfidd. Ohio it is 
ordered that Queen Wic- 
toria Ramson Tra^ do 
appear on w before the 
2nd of Novemba, 1979. 
and do «lMt may be 
neoesswry to protect her 
interest hi this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Stuart R. Gordon. p.q. 
P.O. Box 2257 
Virginia Beach. Virginia 
23452 

9/12. 9/19, 9/26, 10/3 



IT IS FURTHER 

ORDERED that tlM fore- 
g(^ portion of this 
ORDER be pubUthed 
once a week for two 
sucMSsi^ weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper having gmeral 
drculaticm in the Oty of 
Virginia Beach. Virgilria. 

A Copy Teste 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

Thomas A. Connor 
Ansell St Coanot 
4336 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23452 

9/12, 9/19 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 6th day of Sq)tember, 
1979. 

Eddie Harold Smith, 
Pbuntiff. against IXmna 
Ann Powell Smith, D^ 
fendant. 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
QRCUrr COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH ON THE 
5TH DAY OF SEPTEM- 
BER, 1979. 

Re: Estate of George R. 
Reyncdds. Deceased. 

ORDER 

It ^q)earing tlutt a rqwrt 
of the accounts of Hrst 
and Modumtt National 
Bank. Norfolk. Virgbia. 
Electm^ of the Ettate of 
George R. Reynddt. de- 
omsed. md of the d^Mt 
ami donands agahitt Ids 
EMtte bxvt be» fitod fai 
the Oeric's Office of this 
Court, and that six 
momhs has ^qpaed since 
the quidificatkm, <» mo- 
tkm of tlw Exe^ttor. 

It is ORDERED tint 
tlw oeditOTS of, Md all 
ottos intoeMKi hi. tte 
EttiM ito ^ow cuse, if 
Mqr thqr am, on t& list 
day of Stptimhet, \9J9, 
at 10:00 o'clock A.M.. 
before tl^ Cowt tt iu 
courtroom against the 
pa^mot 1^ d^ory of 
the Estate of Ckot§t R. 
RqmM, dncMcd, to tlK 
Ugaiem wittoM reqdr- 
hig rri^mifii^ bcHids. 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Hie object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vincuk) matrimonii from 
the said Defendant, upon 
the groimds of one y«u' 
separation. 

And ui affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defoidant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the hut known 
post office address being: 
Beacham's Apartments, 
Api. 551, Jacksonville, 
North Carolina 28540 h is 
ordered that Donna Ann 
Powell Smith do appear 
on or bef(ve the 30th of 
October, 1979. and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect ho- interest m this 
suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Whiteman & Sadler 
6330 Newtown Road 
Norfolk, Virginia 

9/12. 9/49, 9/26, 10/3 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beadi Board of Zoning Appeals will 
conduct a Public Hearing on Wednesday. October 3, 
1979. at 7:30 P.M. in the Council Chambers, 
Adndnistration Building, Municipal Center, Virginia 
BeMh. Vnginia. The following applications will appear 
on the agenda. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. Barry C. and Diana J. Brown request a variance of 2 
feet to an 8 foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required (enlar^ and enclose existing screened porch) 
on Lot 9. Mock 12. Section E, Cape Henry, 208 69th 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

2. Comet Coiutruction '^Corporation by Angdo J. 
Carawana, President, requiests a variance of 2 feet to a 
23 foot side yard adjacent tb a street (Little Lake Drive) 
instead of 25 feet as requned on Lot 6, Section 2. Trent 
Berkshire, Little Lake Court. Lynnhaven Borough. — - 



as required and of 5 feet to a 3 fo« side yard setback 
(west side) instead of 10 feet as requind on Lms 23 and 
24. Block I. Oiesapeake Park. Ocean View Avenue. 
Bayside Borough. 

14. Robert B. and Barbara H. Cromwdl, Jr. request a 
variance of 30 feet to a "O" front yud setback iaatead 
of 30 feet as required on Lots 21 and 22, Kodt 1. 
Chesapeake Park, Ocean View Avenue. Bayside 
Borough. 

15. Vemard F. Wayiwr requests a variance of 30 feet to 
a "O" front yard setback instead of 30 feet as requhcd 
on Lots 19 and 20. Block 1, Chesapeake Park, Ocean 
View Avenue. Ba^ide Borough. 

16. Mason B. Dickens requesU a variance (tf 10 feet to a 
"O" side yard setback inttead of 10 feet as required on 
Lot 93, Section 2. LiJceville Estates. 980 Suna^ide 
IMve. 

17. Kempsville Presbyterian Church requettt a variance 
of 9 feet to 44 feet hi height instead of 33 feet in h«ght 
for a structure as allowed (church) on a 7 acre Parcel, 
part of 25.31 1 acre site. Plat showing apartment area of 
Fairfield for Fairfield Development Corporation, V^ 
Kempsville Road. Konpsville Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1 . General Machine and Welding Corporation by &uce 
B. Mills. Attorney, requests a variance of 2.3 feet to a 
2.5 foot side yard setlwck instead of 5 feet as required 
(east side) and of 7.5 feet to a 2.3 foot side yard setback 
instead of 10 feet as required (west side) on Lot 29, 
Block 138, Ridgecrest, 2^ Street. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

2. Aragona-Garcia Enterprises, Inc. requests a variance 
of 36.25 square fe^ of sign allowance to 76.25 square 
feet of sign allowance instead of 40 square feet of sign 
area as allowed and to allow a second si^ on the 
building where prohobited on Store 57. Pared R. 
Princess Anne Plaza Shopping Center, 3333 Vurginia 
Beach Boulevard. Lynnhaven Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 

W.L. Towers 
Secretary 

9/12,9/19 



REZONING 

from page 1 
The deferrals create a hardship fot the ^pi^cants 



mcst of the time, b^t somethne, opponents to a petidon 

,j ■ vLj. slu>w up at council meetings only to find oi^ they have 

3. RblaWdB. ah<rOaa'Sc6irr«que«w(varitn<M^td>allowB>ito ^^f^^ , ^^^ 1,^^^ TheoredoiDy the same thing 
parUng of major recreatibhal equipment in front of a 



buildhig instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 12. Nock U. 
Section 3, Birdiwood Gardens. 544 Crosby Road. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

4. Gary W. Seay requests a variance of 5 feet to a 40 
foot buildhig height instead of 33 feet Ui height as 
allowed (single family dwdlin^ on Lot 1. Replat on 
RtKlee HdghU. Harbour Point. 509 Harbour Point. 
Lynnhaven Brarough. 

5. Itace D. Chmcy requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment hi front of a building 
instead of bdund the nearest portion of a building 
adjacent of a pubUc stre^ on Site 0-14. Olydon ViUage. 
131 1 Glydon Drive. Kempsville Borou^. 

6. Ddmar-Ski«gs and George Uneberry by Grover 
Wri^t. Attorn^, requestt a variance of 10 feet to a 
"O" setback from both Atlantic Avenue and 9th Street 
hiMead of 10 feet each at required and of 38 parkmg 
qiaces to "O" parking q»aces instead of 38 parkmg 
qMces at requhed (amuscmoit cento-) on south 55 feet 
of Ut 11. Block 10, Plat #2. Virguiia Beach 
Devdopment Co.. 900 Adantic Avenue. Virguiia Beach 
Borough. 

7. Thtmias Barton Co^rove. Contract Owner, by 
Oirard C. Larkui. Jr., Attorney, requestt a variance of 
10 feet to a 10 foot front yard setback bistead of 20 feet 
as recpiired on Lots 17. 18. 19. Block 62, Shadowhiwn 
Heights. Goldsboro Avenue. Virgbiia Beach Borough. 

8. Mmt Dunmngton requesU a vviance to aUow an 
enlaqament of a nonoonformhig structure where 
prohMted (tbigle family residence) on Lot 8, Block D. 
Vhrghiia Beach Park. 413 19th Street. Virgbua Beach 
Bmough. 

9. Leon B. HoWak requeatt a variance of 3 feet to a 7 
foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as required (east 
side) on Lota 15, 17, 19 aad 21. Bkx* 56. Shadowlawn 
Heights. 819 Goldsboio Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Boroi^^. 

10. l^aes V. and CXi^ A. Splva request a variamx of 
2 feet in fence hd^t to a 10 foot foice instead of an 8 
foot fence at aUowed (eodoie a tennis court) on Lot 26, 
Block D, Sedbn 5. Lariopur Meadows, 705 Southleaf 
Mm. Kenqwvitte Borouiii. 

11 . irabun M. Blown re^Ktts a ^wiance of 5 feet to a 
5 toot rem ^rd tetbadr iattead of 10 fed u required 
(gi^ge) tm Lot 16, Blodc C. Sectkm 1. Huntington, 
5416 Hmterat Road. Kce^Nvilte B<m»^. 

12. 0a»r F. Baxter. IV, re^csu a variatrae of 5 fed w 
a 10 toot dde ^ adbadc iMtead of 15 fed at retphed 
(wttt dde) OB Lot «. Section 12-B. Kmgs Grant. 
C^yvodak Lane. L^utaven Borou«h. 

13. Jmms F. ai^ CWvaO. T^rnitmi reqiwd a variance 
of 30 fea to a "O" from yud setback bistead of 30 fed 



can happorthe next month if the signs have not been 

posted ^rrect^. _; 

Monday aftonoon tbree items were defemd until 
Oct. 15. But people ofqiosing one of the petitions 
objected to bdng turned away. 

Actually, council had no choice but to postpone 
action. City attorney I^e Bimson said that cmmdl 
could hear the peoi^ but could not act mi the petition 
because requirem^ts of the ordinance had not been 
md. 

In this instance, the Enunanud Tabemade Churdi 
had applied for a change of zoning from R.gResidential 
District to B-2 Community Business Dtetrid m a .266- 
acre pared on the west side of Morrison Avoiue. south 
of Gator Road, Lynnhaven Borough. 

The Phuuiing Commission reccnpniended denial. Tlie 
Pinewood Gardens and Eureka Park Civic League also 
objeded because the church planned to use the building 
for a fund-raisuig operation ip whidi used machandise 
was sold. 

Vice Mayor J. Henry McCoy suggested dispennng 
with the poUcy. but was told that the section of the code 
requiring the two weeks notice would have to be 
changed. „ 

Mayor Patrick L. Standing suggested a trial period, 
which was ultimatdy fixed tm the period ending Od. 
27, and then considering a change. 

Councilman R.L. R^ remarked that, "In essence, 
we're allowing pec^ to break the Uw." 

Coundlmah Rdd Ervin said thm it < tepai < toi on how 
conscientious you have to be about proper 
notification." 

Bimson said that the requirerooit is load ui origin and 
that tl» state does not require potthig for a ooundl 
meeting. 

The other two items deferred were a request from 
Elsie Tann for a variance to SedkM 4.4 (b) of the 
^bdivision Ordinance which requires kM dhnenskms to 
conform to tlw CmiyHdiendve Sbmhig On&iance, and 
an iqqilkation by James and Jean Drinko for a change 
of zoning from R-6 Residoitial Dittrid to R-8 
Residential Distrid oa two paro^ totaUhig 3.19 acres 
located cm bMh ndes of Rkklk Avoiiw, south of Air 
Statitm Drive, Lynnhaven BmxHigh. 



FREEDOM 



frwnpoft 3 

ackbcn ^>u tothty for althbugh I am a naturd hom 
Anwrkan, I am sure you can tdl by my accem that V 
iMve MM ahvays Uved ui this pern country. 

As a diOd of sev» I rdimied to my n»ther's 
hoo^and of Bdpum and remdned there for 16 yean. 
When 1 rduriMd to the United ^iMs d the i^ of 23 I 
had learned s«m of Hnt moA uqwrtam Icnms of my 
life. I Iwl learned pt^Mpi Uke some of ytra here todqr. 
that liberty and justice are fn^ ooonKktties e^ 
taken away. In my caK, the tea<Aer was Adolf Hitlar. 
and his Gestapo. When Be^him was tovaded. I jotawd 
the partisans, the redstaaoe movcBMm and worked for 
fteedom uatU I was captured by the Oedapo ah>ni with 
my fiance Arthur Ubre. I wiU not take m> vour thae 

Set FREEDOM, ps^t 12 



NOTICE 

The Annual Report of 
the^ody Fsunily Founda- 
ticHi is available for in- 
vpte&on at 2701 Avenger 
Drive, Virginia Beach, 
Vugbiia, Mtmday through 
Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. 

Julian Rashkind 
Foimdatkm Manager 

9/12 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH. ON 
THE 6TH DAY OF 
SEPTEMBER. 1979. 

In re: Adoption of Farah 
Ferdeen Alfad Abbas an 
faifant under the age of 
fourteen (14) years, and 
Change of Name to Farah 
Alfad Atangan 

By: Lope V. Atangan and 
Nadka A. Atangan, Hus- 
band and Wife, Peti- 
tioners. 

ORDER 

This day came Lope V. 
Atangan and Nadira A. 
Atangan, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effed the adoption of the 
above named infant(s), 
Farah Ferdeen Alfad 
Abbas, by Lope V. Atan- 
gan and Nadira A. Atan- 
gan, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that 
Ferdausi Yahya Abbas, a 
natural parent of said 
child(ren), is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Viiginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
c/o Zorayda Tamano, 30 
Bohol Avenue, Quezon 
City, Philippines. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Ferdausi 
"Yahya Abbas appear 
before this Court within 
ten (10) days after publica- 
tion of this Order and 
indicate his/her attitude 
toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to pro- 
ted his interest in this 
vcaxus. 



A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, cle^ 
By: Raymond W. 
Bjorkman, D. C. 

John D. Hooker, Jr. p.q. 
Post Office Box 6363 
Virginia Beach. VA 23456 

9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3 



CHILD 
CARE 

fiompage 1 

petUicm a(q)roved by the 
ten council members pre- 
sent. Hie Woods live on a 
10.050 square foot pared 
(m the west side of Edwin 
Drive, south of Princess. 
Anne Ro«i, KanpsviUe. 

Wood said that he and 
his wife had no ivobtems 
and that the Fox Run 
Civic League now sup- 
ported the operation. 
Councilwoman Meyera 
Oberndorf and Vice 
Mayor J. H«ry McCoy 
Jr. vdio said they pass the 
iKMne daily, ai^eed that 
everythmg Moned to be 
hi order. 



MAnocrnAci; 

n* dMrifiia wcUm or t 




iiBhv. 



^ ~ ^ — — 



I- 



10 VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1979 



ijp-^jK «»«« V vv«vc!w«p«ipwii4p^p.v * «v ji#i » 9 mw-WH^r^m^mmmmm 



ueacn education 



New teachers prepare for 55,000 students 



School started Monday, 
August 27, in the public 
schools of Virginia Beach, 
but only for the teachers 
and administrators. For 
the students, the opening 
day was Tuesday, Sept- 
ember 4, the day after 
Labor Day. 

Just short of 300 tea- 
chers new to the school 
system this year gathered 
at Plaza Junior High 
School Monday morning 
along with school admini- 
strators for brief welcom- 
ing remarks by Dr. E. E. 
Brickell, Superintendent 
of Schools, and for the 
showing of a 2S-minute 
orientation slide-tape pro- 
gram prepared by the 
Educational Media Center 
and the Public Informa- 
tion Office. 

City Manager George 
Hanbury, Mayor Patrick 
Standing, and School 
Board Chairman Robert 
DeFord Jr., also ad- 
dressed the new teachers./ 
Several City Council and^ 
School Board members 
attended the program. 

Of the new teachers, 
slightly more than a third 
are first-year teachers. Of 
those with experience, 
about 75 come from other 
school divisions in 
Virginia; over 30 formerly 
taught in Virginia Beach 
public schools; four 
taught at private schools 
in Virginia Beach; three 
are from foreign coun- 
tries; and more than 40 
had previous teaching ex- 
perience in other states. 
Georgia topped the list 




It was ■ reunion of sorts for tcachen but week. Vii|hria Beack Qty CoaKllwonaa 
Barbary Henley, a former school teacher, met with one of her former students who 
is now a new teacher in Virginia Beach. Pictored at left is City Councilwoman 
Meyera Obemdorf . 



of new out-of-state tea- 
cl|ers; New York was next; 
in ibird place was North 
Carolina; California and 
Pennsylvania tied for 
fourth; Florida and Ohio 
for fifth; and twelve other 
states each had one. 

One new teacher taught 
last in Puerto Rico. The 
three from foreign coun- 
tries came from Okinawa, 
Italy, and the Philipines, 
respectively. 

With the return of the 
last year's teachers on 
Tuesday, August 28, the 
teacher ranks swelled to 
nearly 2,900, about 50 
more than a year ago at 



this time. 

The average salary of 
Virginia Beach teachers at 
present is $13,393, and the 
average teaching exper- 
ience in the school system 
is six years. 

The new first-year tea- 
chers attended 32 different 
colleges. Old Dommion 
University tops the Hst, 
with 35 new Virginia 
Beach teachers; James 
Madison University is 
next, with ten; Virginia 
Wesleyan is third, with 
seven; WilUam and Mary 
and Duke score fourth 
place honors; Radford 

qndVPT ^ri» ti*H fnr fifth; 



Norfolk State, the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina and 
the University of Virginia 
share sixth place honors. 
Following the orienta- 
tion program Monday, the 
new teachers, along with 
administrators and guests ' 
were treated to brunch at 
Plaza Junior High. That 
afternoon and the rest of 
the week were spent in 
subject or grade meetings, 
faculty meetings at indivi- 
dual schools, or working 
in individual rooms and 
work areas preparing for 
the onslaught of about 
55,000 students Uie fol- 
lowii^ Tuesd a yr^ - 



l-l/ni 



Women of Wesleyan plan annual flea market 



" — How^ould you like to 
clean out the atic, garage 
and closets and, make 
some extra money, with- 
out having to go to the 
trouble of having a garage 
sale at your own home? 

If the idea appeals to 
you, call now and reserve 
a space in the Eleventh 
Annual Women of Wesle- 
yan Flea Market sche- 
duled for 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. Saturday, September 
29, at the Twin Drive-In 
Theaters in Virginia 
Beach. Space reservations, 
costing $10 for two auto- 
size spaces, are now being 
taken. Early reservations 
are assured preferred* 
spaces. 

Ten years and more 
than $30,000 ago, the 
Women of Wesleyan de- 
cided to sponsor a little 
flea market to raise some 
money for special projects 
at Virginia Wesleyan 
College. One of the 
earliest flea markets in 
Tidewater, it has now 
growifsinto one of the 
largest, annually attract- 
ing thousands of buyers 
and hundreds of sellers 
from Virginia, North 
Carolina and the District 
of Columbia. 

The Women of Wesle- 
yan receive only the 
money paid for the space 
reservations. The indivi- 
dual sellers keep all of the 
proceeds from their sales. 
In past years, the Women 
f Wesleyan have pro- 



vided booKs for Hol- 
heimer Library, built the 
college greenhouse, and 
provided furniture for the 
lounges in Academic Vill- 



age 1 and the Student 
Center. 

For space reservations 
or for further information 
about the WOW Flea 



Market call Mrs. Eva 
Grant at 428-1698, Mrs. 
Beverly Thrasher at 420- 
1416 or Mrs. Dot Stephens 
at 623-1742. 



Mailing tips for 0Pege students 



^ 



Students are going off 
to college and for many, itj 
is the first time they will 
have a mailing address 
away from home. 

Many potential mail 
problems can be avoided 
by following a few simple 
suggestions, Norfolk's 
Postmaster M. H. Hodges 
Jr., said. 

First, give the post 
office prompt notice of 
your new address at 
college, whether on or off 
the campus. There is a free 
"Change of Address Kit" 
available at the post 
office. It contains cards 
with which you can notify 
those who serjd you mail 
regularly, ^such as news- 
papers and magazines, re- 
latives, friends, clubs, 
banks, and other busi- 
nesses. 

In most college housing, 
including dormitories, 
mail is usually distributed 
from a central mailroom, 
either on call over the 
counter or to individual 
boxes. Some college 
housing, however, does 
not have such mailrooms; 
and letter carriers deliver 
directly to student boxes 



in the building lobby. 
Make sure that your box is 
properly identified with 
your name. 

For students livmg off 
campus in apartments, 
rooming houses, fraterni- 
ties, or sororities, make 
sure there is a clear under- 
standing of where your 
maO is to be delivered and 
how it is distr^;>uted. 

If you change addresses 
while away at school, 
repeat the process of 
notifying the post office 
and your regular corres- 
pondents with another 
"Change of Address Kit." 
Also, tell the college mail- 



room. 

When you leave school 
for short holidays or re- 
cesses, your best bet is to 
arrange for your mail to 
be picked up and held for 
your return by someone 
you trust, or you can ask 
the post office to hold 
your mail while you are 
away or forward it to your 
home or wherever you wiD 
be. 

Finally, when the school 
year is over, you can make 
sure that your mail will be 
delivered promptly by 
again notifying the post 
office of your current 
address. 



Kempsville library 
conducts film program 



The Virginia Beach 
Kempsville Branch 
Library is currently con- 
ducting a children's film 
series. The films are 
shown every Satimiay at 2 
p.m. All movies are free. 



The Kempsville Branch 
Library is located at 832 
Kempsville Road. For 

further information con- 
tact Linda Hendrickson at 
420-2270. 




: Colonial Shoe Repair 

C0UE6E PARK SHOPPINfi CENTER 



PHONE 424-7433 

* - 

«57ANb«nilM«t 
nMMAKACN,VA.234C4 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, INC. 

FRANCIS 6. GRIFnN,M.D. 
BERTRAM L WARREN, JR., M.D. 
L. USLIE WASSERMAN, JR., II.D. 



far Mm praclica af 

OBSTERICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

S302FairfMdSlMppli«Ct 

■* ^- — ^ Bb ■III Jaaa ■ A J 

Hfi^vVWt mm rrWMMCv ll«* 

MnWalMdi,Va.23«2 



^ 



481-2434 



September dates announced 
for recycled aluminum pick-ups 

It's September, and time to go back to Khpol. It's 
time to start thinking about reading, 'riting, 'rithmetic 
and recycling? Yes, you can recycle all-alunrinum 
beverage cans and get cash, 23 cents per pound, ft<m 
Reynolds Aluminum Recycling Company. 

'Educators are learning that by participating in a 
recycling program, students arie becoming more 
consciols^ about ecology and cleaning up the 
environment. They also learn that they are contributing 
to the conservation of valuable natural resourras and 
energy. 

During the month of September, Reynolds 
Aluminum Recycling Company will pay recyclers 23 
cent& a pound for recyclable aluminum at: 

The Civic Center (Dome), 19th and Pacific Aven., 
second and fourth Wednesday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; 

Recycling Service Center, 1435 Air Rail Ave., 
Tuesday thru Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Recyclable aluminum consists of all-aluminum 
beverage cans and clean household items, such as foil, 
frozen food and dinner trays, pie plates, and dip, 
pudding and meat containers. * 

Reynolds also recycles certain other items including 
aluminum siding, gutters, storm door and window 
frames, and lawn furniture tubing which are also worth 
23 cents per pound if properly prepared. This aluminum 
must be free of all foreign materials, cut to lengths not 
exceeding three feet and should not be mixed with 
aluminum cans. Aluminum castings are also recyclable. 



School lunch menu 



Supplemental materials fees 
for Virginia Beach schools 

$7.00 ~ American Life. 
$6.00 -Industrial Arts. 
$5.00 - Social Studies 8, World Geography, World 

History, U.S. History (1 1th Grade). U.S. 

Government (12th Grade), Band, Home 

Economics I and II, Foods I and II, Art, and 

Physical Education (Grades 11-12). 
$4.50 ~ Stenography 1 and II, Clerk-Typist I and II, 

Clerical Accounting I and II, Office Services II and 

III, and office Practice. 
$4.00 ~ Independent Life. 
$3 .50 ~ Physical Education (Grades 7-10). 
$3.00 ~ Drama, P hysi cal Science (PathwaysJ»ro^am. 
'"^ 8tTi Grade), Earth Science (Pathways Program, 9th 

Grade), Basic Mathematics 8, Chorus, I.C.T., 
/Special Education (Per period), Disabled UmAart 
I (Per period), and Industrial Arts (Grade 7). 
S2.50 ~ Anthropology, Economics, International 

Relations, Psychology, Art, and Home Economics 

(Grade 7). »- 

$2.00 ~ Remedial, Average, and Superior English. 
$ 1 . 50 ~ Music Theory and Music Literature. 
Sl.OO- Clothing I ahd II. 



EtaMBlary scImmIi 

WcdncMiay, Sept. 12 

pizza w/meat A cheese 

buttered green pitos 

applesauce cup 

(roasted peanuts) 

chilled milk 

Thnnday, Sept. 13 

fried chicken 

buttered rice w/gravy 

mued vegetables 

banana 

hot roU/butter 

chilled milk 

Friday, Sept. 14 

taco w/lettuce A tomato 

buttered com 

fruited gelatin 

sweet roll w/nuts 

chilled milk 

Monday, Sept. 17 

barbecue on bun 

fr«ich fries w/catsup 

crispy cole slaw 

chilled milk 

Tuesday, Sept. U 

spaghetti w/meat sauce 

tosses salad w/dressing 

sliced peaches 

french roll/butter 

chilled milk 

Wedoeaday, Sept. 19 

hot dog on bun 
(chili is optional) 

baked beans 
pineapple cup 
oatmnl cookie 

chlUedmilk 

Thnnday, Sept. 20 

fish sandwich on cheese bun 

french fries w/catsup 

buttered grem peas 

chilled milk 



Friday, Sept. 21 

poor boy sandwich 

(bologiaft cheese) 

buttled pera beans 

diced pears 



WmECHfflCE 

For a wide choice of buyers, 
renters, workors in your 



netKhborlK>od,/uie low cMt 
claniried ads m your hometown 
newspaper. Gfi results quickl 



4- 



ABCDBP«IIIJKLMII«PttBtTVVWXTl| 

C 



c 



ALPHABET : 

KOLLEdfe I 

Day Car* C«nt*r ■ 

Registration for Fall Year Round Full I 

DayPrtvnim 

AfMlthruSyrs. 

Hours 7:30 a.iii. • 6 p.iii. 

F9ae9d Play Ana 

Balaneil Maala ProvUad 

RaglBtratloH Opan to tha Public 

468-6S4S 
3164 MAGIC HOLLOW BLVD. 



o 

o 
ABioifiiiJinaiiiapftaaTwvwKYi 




BOYKIN'S MUSIC SHOP 

"SCHOOL MtTmiMINT SPECIALISTS" 
SALES St SERVICE 

'<ASK ABOUT OUR RENTAL PLAN" 



uiMS aMBML oacN. tTMNM amauiMim 



nnuVm mmvnKmOm ai ^ 

RaiMlnAvalMolii'^^ 





420-7182 

Fanifield Smppme Centeh 




(lOMnMUIMBM 



l=^-mmt 



Secondary schools 

Wednesday, Sept. 12 

pizza w/meat & cheese 

buttered green peas 

applesauce cup 

(roasted pieanuts) 

chilled milk 

Thursday, Sept. 13 

manager's 
choice 

Friday, SepR 14 

taca w/lettuce & tomato 

buttered corn 

fruited gelatin 

sweet roil w/nuts 

chilled milk 

Monday, Sept. 17 

barbecue on bun 

french fries w/catsup 

crispy cole slaw 

chilled milk 

Tuesday, Sept. 18 

spaghetti w/meat sauce 

tossed salad w/dressing 

sliced peaches 

french roll/butter 

." chilled milk 

Wednesday, Sept. 19 

hot dog on bun 

(chili is optional) 

baked beans 

pineapple cup 

chilled milk 

Thnrsday, Sept. 20 

fish sandwich on cheese bun 

french fries w/catsup 

buttered green peas 

chilled milk 

Friday, Sept. 21 

beefaroni 

buttered green beans ' 

diced pears 

hot roU/butter 

chilled milk 



LOCAL touch' 

, No other nwdiun k 

cbiUedmilk "^ htefll^JS^ 



yow 



Wi 




A professional 
8x10 color portrait 

All ages welcome • babies, adults, and fami- 
lies! Choose from our selection of scenic 
and color backgrounds. We'll select poses, 
and additional portraits will be available with 
no obligation. Satisfaction always, or your 
money cheerfully refunded. 

A Great WAy to Remember 

Those You Love 

IWM MVi ONLY • MrflMKIIi 
Tim WD mUM PM MT 

it it it 14 u 

UMLVttQMI-tm 




First subtoct BS^. Additional subjects $1.00 

eadi. Backgrounds mm occastonatly 

change. Remember, chiMren must be 

aocom p ani ed >y a pmmt. 



^w^«w^i^HW^^P«pav^iivawB«^nwa*B^Pl^i^i^"*«P^i^^*P>!*>w* 



-r- 



^^^^^P^f^WiW<i»PPHPi«i^i^i^»l^»?w^' 



■g»gggi^^HPHPjjii I J - II ii»i»ii» . ■■ ,-»ijn , '^"jiij ij 



V 




2-ipwWIMicM 



6AtttoiiMMItsf*r$ri« 



IJ'lMlp WMIM 



REDUCE SAFE A FAST 
with OoBcM TiUeU ft 

E-Vap "muter pm"Qn*t 
Bridve Phannacy. 

2 , 2TP9/19 

SUUMTE 

You'n MK lo act a Um if ymi 
<irop a Ine in the dttdlM 
o*"Biit of your conunwiity 
newtiMiNr. Your datiifM ad b 
put of the Ikmmiowii Mwt tin 
everybody warns to rcMi at «mU 
at the news of Ike cammuiuty. 

WANTED: your 

household extras - 
clothing, furniture and 
junk ~ by Rimds Sdiool 
Thrift Store.J All 
donations are tax 
deductible; Prompt, free 
pickup. Qdl4»-7841. 

I 2TF 




WRAP UP THIS 

WINTER in tUs gorieous 
RED SQUIRREL coatll 
Handmade - one of a 
kindll EXQUISITE-siK 
34. Excellent price. 497- 
4207. 

4 CDS 9/12/79 

2 

«• 

MARIANA FURRIER 
AND TALORING SH(^ 

- Now is the time to have 
that fur rejuvinated for 
cpid weather! I Special 
prices all the time!! 
ALTERATIONS ALSO!! 
Work guarenteedl 85^ 
3904 

4CDB9/12/79 



TheiBttiar* 



hfoin covcr-to-«owr (Mh isMia it 
not only a wcB-infotiMd posoo 
byt Ins or Imi 
knowlodae titfou^ this mdins 
habit bhImi tban fruf w iw tile 
most Hinte huyas ia tUi 



BOOKKEEPING SER- 
VICES AVAILABLE. 

Notary t<x state at hurfe. 
small businesses a 
specialty, financial 
statements, tmeral iedfo-, 
fed. and state, 
unemployment taxes, 
payroll, accounts payable 
and receiveable, bank 
statoDcitts. 4SM04I. 
2 4rCDB9/19 

EXTRACASH 

It's so easy...advertise the 
things ^u no kmger need 
in the classifled ccriumns^ 
of your hmoetown newa- 
ptfa. In pracdcaily no 
time at aB. peopte in 
your neigfaboriiood wiU , 
kiww what you have to 
seU. 

TENNIS LisSONS FOR 
BEGINNERS. Learn 
fondamcotaia and ajoy 
tomis in a short time. 
Taught by college 
histrttctor. SS.OO an hoiv 
for Individual or S6.00 an 
hour for 2 (w more. 547- 
0741. 

4TCDB 9/12/79 
2 



OmMMITOIIIHP 

$is.Nt.aa m fut 

MtrnM 
tM,iM.ta Ml mi 

f uu ran HtfiNTiauii 

(RTioir* Aiiosoi nm 

nuns ciuif 

DURO SUPfi GIUI II* 

MIlLIONSIIir 
mwrnmn 

10 WMwn nK» neoocn 





CALL ALTON- The best 
fund raising propam yet. 
For hoinewives, schools, 
dubs, and organiiafions. 
No inveAment. 30 percoit 
'jTOfit. 343-27fi6. 
2 4 CBD 10-3-79 

AVOID XMAS SBOP- 
PING CROWDS. Shop b 

the convenieitoe of your 
hmne or by idMoe for 
those qtedal Xmas, bfarth- 
day, and annivafiaiy gifts. 
Many great Avon spedab 
and many new items. Ear- 
ly shon>en bonus up to 
Sept. 23- save up to $10. 
CaU Dtmna Jones at 490- 
^2413 if you do not have m 
' 'Avon reprcsentatiwe. 
2 « 4CBD9'1^79 



MatamaMlw far Sale 



^' 



LTD- 4 door, air 
oradltiooing and wiginal 
owner. 412-1734. 



1TBD9-12 
.....CTEVROLCT :- '73 Matt-i 
*^ Carlo. powaifiMMs * 
brakes, air, cndae oootiol, 
automatic. AM-FM 
steno. Radials. S1493. 
497-3264. 
6 lCBD9-1^79 

NOVA - '76. standard 
shift, good condition, 
$2100. 4204)143. 



2CBD9/19 



UKM-TCVCH 

No ottar Mdim it bonwl up 
Willi the everyday Itfe ^ your 



COKVtm-*€! Coive. 
4 qpeed, ak, loaded, ask- 
ing $8300; 4«9'I360. 
6 1 CBD9'13-79 

CAMARO- 1974. Auto- 
matic. 6 cfi., endlem 
condition, good mpg. 
$2300. 481-3140. very 
dean. 
6 1CBD9-12-79 

VW- '72 Squarebaek. 
Good oondUoD, fed in- 
jectioB, ^fx cri lfBt nmnhig 
CMuMtioBt 4 door, dean, 
Hffr-^ne battery, 3 practi- 
cally new tires, 32-36 mpg. 
on road. 4S64243. 
6 ICBD9-1^79 



22'Bafi-C8tsaiMl 

ether Pets 



NON-COMSSIONED 
OFFICERS ASSOC, is 

seeking coimsdtm for the 
Tidewater area. CaU Mr. 
Bamett at 499-6819. Re- 
tired military prtfored. 
2 CDB-TF 

ROTO-HLUNG Fall 
Special. 23^ off for gar- 
den or new lawn, my dze, 
area.48^2779 

2 4a 9/26 



1974 MAZDA pick-up 
with shell, New paint, 
clutch, brakes and tires. 
Perfect shape. Call 486- 
6252. 

4H9/13 
6 



S-AataNrts, Repair 



KEYSTONE ELEC- 
TRONIC ENGINE 
ANALYZER S300. 
HANDY Clean parts 
CiCTner $200. Please caU 
499-4915 or 461-6640. 
8 4CDB9/18 

WE WUL BUY used and 
junk automobiles. Call 
340-6902 anytime. 
8 TFCBD 



> M a t a rc yclw-Sc— tara 



WHYWALK??r When 
you am ride a MO-PED! 
SNARK-1979 • 150 mpg. 
Like newl S325. 481-1470 
9 4CDB9-26 



TELLER - Part time exp. 
only need ^ply. Chesa- 
peake Bfflik ft Trust 547- 
5164. 
13 4CDB10-3 

HELP WANTED^ Part- 
time. 6-8 hrs. a week. 
Establish and service 
jewdry showcases in local 
area. $25 a week guaran- 
teed. Mr. Hamilton, 420- 
2756. 
13 2CBD9-12 

WORK AT HOME IN 
SPARE TIME doing 
telephone afirvey work. 
No experience necessary. 
Students and housewives 
welcome. Call now collect 
for Mrs. Brasher at (205) 
592-0183. 

5TCDB 9/19/79 

13 

HELP WANTED 

PORTER - Must have 

experience in operating 

floor care machines. 

Excellent opportunity. 

Call executive 

housekeeper, 547-9111. 

EEOC 

13 4TCBD9/18 



IMMp Wanted 



14-PositiaiK Waatad 



Advertising 

Sales 
Communlt} 
Newspapei^ 

We're growing, come 
grow with us! Newspaper 
advertising experiences 
helpful but not necessary 
if you have a background 
in business or marketing 
-^ psreer potential Full 
Time position ~ salary - 
commission ~ .Expenses 



PERFECT PART-TIME 

job. Do you love plants ft 
people? Must be 18 and 
have own transportation. 
CaU Claire. (919) 435- 
2282. 

14 2CBD9/26 

BABYSITTING ~ My 

home, age 2-5. 
Chesapeake, Norcova 
Estates. Weekly. CaU 547- 
8290. 



^. . ^ r4 4T COB 9/19 

or comMe^ c©B«^rti Aor 
faigs in CSiesapeake or 



";1f ':.-!.*' 



Virginia Beach ~ write or 
caU hi person (no phone 
caUs please) E>onald R. 
Frye, Gen. Mgr. Byerly 
Publications, Publishers 
of the Virginia Beach Sun 
ft the Chesapeake Post 
P.O. Box 1327 Chesa- 
peake. Va. 23320 

13/tf 
SALES HOLIDAY 
MAGIC COSMETICS- 
Qpportunity to advance 
to numagement. Liberal 
oommbsion, car helpful, 
tidewater area. CaU 467- 
4040. No investment 
reqidred. 
13 CDB-TF 

RBNnrrraiS - General 
assignments, features, 
news editing with weekly 
newspapers in Southside 
and Tidewater Virginia. 
Prefa joumaUsm sdnxd 
background and some 
experience. Must have 
good typing abUity and 
be wQlhig to learn news 
ph(M<Vraphy. If you are 
hitereMed in more detaUs, 
write l^vid Woodruff, 
Byeriy PubUcations, 1000 
Armory Drive, Franl^. 
Va. 23831. 
13 HTF 



1 5 B asl a aa a O ppa rt a H H y 



PART-TIME Toys, gifts, 
party demonstrators,^ free 
sample kits, no invest- 
ment, coUectii>g or de- 
Uvering. 547-5367 
13 2CBD9-12 

$353.88 WEEKLY guar- 
anteed. $58.90 daUy start 
immediately. Homework. 
Free. Ballard, 7901 
Hampton Blvd., Lot 
161-B. Norfolk, Va. 
23505. 



15 



1CBD9/12 



FLEA MARKET for sale 
-Owners Finance! Lo- 
cated at %42 CamposteUa 
Road. Chesapeake. Please 
caU 545-6944 or 545-9071 
15 4CDB9-26 

INVESTORS V/ ANTED 

tot Disco Dance Studio 
and Private After Hours 
Club. For fiiU hiformation 
mail letter to 5337 
Talmyra Ct. Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 23462 
15 4CDB9/18 



SIAMESE - Redpoint 
mates and females for f aU 
shows. Bom in March, 
champion and grand 
champion parents. Shots. 
Prices reasonable. CaU 
587-1447 after 7 p.m. or 
wedcends. 



22 



4TH 10/10 



ENGLISH SPRINGER 

PUPPIES - $75 ea., 421- 

2695. 

22 1CBD9^1^79 

COCK A TIELS 8 week 
Normals $35. Albianos 
$75. Male Splits $50. 
Hand fed Noemals $50. 
Please caU 488-6446. 
22 4 COB 9/21 

ONE MALE and femate 
miniature poodle, 7 
wedcs, $73 each. 587-2185 
22 1CBD9^12 

IRISH SETTERS - 5 mo. 

male, also Mother & 
Father, purebred, 587- 
4371. 



22 



2CBD9/19 



PUPS 627-2446. 2 weeks 
dd, SI 50 registered. 
22 4CDB9-26 

FREE KITTENS to a 
good home, six weeks old. 
one yeUow male, 2 caUco 
femates. 547-2952. 

22 2TBD9-26 

SHIH TZU PUPS - AKC 

registered, 12 weeks; 
terms. 587-4575. 



22 



1CBD9/12 



2S4rtide« far Salt 



.^fOj^SAlE - Schwinn 10 
speed bike, antique 
sausage stuffer, Sears 
BroUo* oven. CaU affar T" 
4204293. 
25 4TCDB9/19 

FOR SALE • Gibson Air- 
sweq>, 24,000 B.T.U.'s air 
conditioner, $100, Ken- 
more Dishwasher. $50, 
Gas power lawnmower, 
$15. 428-5861. 



25 



2CBD9/26 






3 PIECE RUST 
NAUGAHYDE living 
room set, suitable for, 
professional office, 
almost new. Sacrifice 
price $800. 481-6544. 
27 



27 



1TCBD9/18 



3-FAMILY GARAGE 
SALE: 417 Sign Pine 
Road, Hickory. 10 - 4:30, 
Thursday and Friday. 
Toys, furniture, jewelry, 
children's dothing, crafts 
and tots of other misceU- 
aneous items. 



28 



1TH9-12 



PARIS STREET FLEA 

MARKET-Open Thurs.- 
Sun. 10-6. Come on in and 
browse 'round! 8 different 
shops. 3450 Azalea 
Garden Rd. 857-0477. 

28/tf 

SOLVE IMONEY WMUtlES 

How' to help solve money 
worrieil IM dattified adt in 
your booMown newspaper tell 
thinis ydu no lonaer.need and 
can do wiUiout. Low cost and 
quickacth^t 



»WartadtaBBy 



WANTED ORIENTAL 
CARPETS~New or Oid~ 
Any condition, any age!!! 
461-3834 ' 2SIAT 



OIKTAN -^ 3^manual Coiar 
organ, modd 650 with 2 
sets of goU pipes! A-1 
conditJonll $6000. 486- 
0082. 
4.C DB 9/12/79 



30 



Sl-Caiaaaad Stands 



NORVIEW- Rare coins - 
NorfoUc's most complete. 
Buy, sdl, trade. Buying 
sUver corns. 42 Southern 
Shoppfaig Center, ^ Nor- 
folk, 853-8118. 
31 CBD-TF 




What's Up Doc? 



An you fining a neiir 
praeiM or ehangtmg hcathnM? Taka 
out an ad ia tin POST/SUN aad w'U 
got tho word out to aH your patloatt 
aad ntaybo ovn torn* mow oaoa. 

CAU 547-4571 



AZALEA, FORSYTHU. 
AnJOA, 8", $5.00 per 
dozen. 2 year old camd- 
Uas. red, $1.00 ~ unUmit- 
ed, 423-2104. or write 
P.O. Box 9862, Wright 
Sution, Granby St., Nor- 
folk, 23505. 
35 4 CBD 10-3-'"' 

SUIEUTE 

You're wre tofct a bite if you 
drop a line in the dassiried 
coiumns of your oommunity 
newspaper. Your datsified ad is 
part of the hometown news that 
evoybody wants to read as well 
ai the news of the conununity . 



ALL TYPES, NEW AND 

used restaurant and bar 
equipment. Dixie 
Equipment Company. 
1008 Granby St. 623-7073 
38/TF 



fartala 



DIXIE - 2 bedrooms, 
storm windows, porch. 
Can stay on lot! Excdlent 
condition!! 461-4903 

4 CDB 9/19/79 
40 

VIRGINUN - 24 X 60, 3 
bedrooms, 2 fuU baths, 
living room, dining room, 
kitchen, family room, 
utUity area, coitral air. 
skirting. Shed included. 
425-8509. 

4 CDB 9/19/79 
40 

1972 CASTLE, 12x50, 2 
bedroom, aU new fiimi- 
ture, $4500, 487-1527. 
40 4 CBD 10-3-79 



45-ilp ari wai iU far Rant 



LbVELY furnished 1-2 
bedro(Nn apartment with 
color TV. Available 
through May. Reasonably 
priced. Pacific West 
Apartments. Motel 306 
29th St. 428-3633. 

45/TFCDB 
45 



GEORCETOWN 
COUMY 

HOME SITES FOR SAU 

FOR 

People piaaaiag Hoaws 
& Custom BaUdcrs 

SALES OFFICE 

333 Providence Rd. 

CAU 444-0317 



n-ServicetOffarad 



PROTECT YOUR 
INVESTMENT - join the 
othei? in Tidewater who 
are having me profession- 
aUy clean and Simonize 
thiir automobile. For 84>- 
pointment caU BiU, 486- 
1537. 
71 CBD-TF 

GOCH> LUCK CHM- 
NEV SWEEP SERVICE- 

Don't risk chimney fues! 
Licensed, and insured pro- 
fessional methods - We 
won't leave you in the 
dust! 547-1226. 
71 CBD-TF 

-raaaoa TO-pa»aoH- 

Tkat's U«! -Tw. u« Xtmw 
LOCAL ■••war>r«r 

BABYSITTING - My 

home in Brigadoon. 
Weekdays only. 467-4430. 
71 4 CDB 10-3 

WE PRINT newspaper, 
circulars, shopping 
guides, anything on news- 
print, with or without 
composition and camera 
services. We take orders 
for smaU tabloid newspa- 
pers with press runs as 
low as 1,000 and we print 
for bigger pubUcations 
with 50,000 and more cir- 
culation. We've got lots 
of Tidewater area cus- 
tomers because we're 
good, we're dependable 
and we're local. Please 
caU Donald R. Frye, 547- 
4571, for information 
and price quotations. 
,You wiU be dealing #ith 
Byerly PubUcations, pub- 
Ushers of the Chesapeake 
Post and the Virginia 
Beach Sun. 

71/tf 



DeiinM ForenMli 
um.m.mpmm»u 



71-larvicaaOHared 



LIGHT HAULINI 

Gvdening, hedge trim- 
ming, lawn mowing, reas- 
onabte ibices — caU for 
estimate! 464-3634. 
71 CBD-TF 

AUTO CRUSHERS-A-1 - 
junk car removing. All 
cars towed away Tree, top 
dollar paid!!! Fast 
Service. ^7-9222 71/TF 

BRAKES Complete brake 
job $59.95, front disc 
$29.95. Call 547-8529 
after 6 p.m. 
71 4T CDB 9/ 19 

CAVALIER KITCHENS 

offCTs Overton unfinished 

cabinets. High quaUty, 

low prices. We offer 

{banning and instaUation, 

or do it yourself! 857- 

1435. 

71 CBD-TF 

TOP PRICE PAID FOR 

jtmk cars - also hite 

modd salvage... CaU 545- 

3517. 

71 CBD-TF 

McCLUNGS UPHOL- 
STERY - slip covers, 
drapes... FREE 

ESTIMATES... Fabric 
shown in your home. 
Discount on aU fabrics. 
853-3904. 

,, 4 CDB 9/12/79 
»■ ■ '" 

MR. ft MRS. PAINTERS 

of the Tidewater area. The 
quaUty of a man- the 
smooth^ touch of a 
woman. Interior-exterior 
painting. 424-4687. 

71/TF CDB 
71 



nKUTYIIMLOEIIS 



CWIMCTDRS 
S47-7402 
547-7288 



AUTORCCYCLERS 
NOW BUYING 

HMNEST PMCn PAID FOR 



*iiaaiaan *rraa lawag 

CHItANAKi 
t ALVAOI CORP. 



MM Steal SIvaat 4B7-M10 



HMD AMERICA'S 
NUMBER 1 NGN- SELLER. 



^V 







Notforaiteinttnr 
bookalaralNotavtf-, 
tibial tittftgk»\ 
IliOoewQmam]! 
bAsimtfiQnCMdogf ^ 

b'atebaeibooidat 
dirt iMiovw 200 
h^pfrjF adattfpi^ 

MA baa. uafe^lCB 
Utkotaan^HBi. 



Nutrition. Infcsma 
^atm that could hrip 
1y!(»itoab^«way 
loilife. 

To^'youriMO 
oof^,^^ write: 



^rintmg iamtJSnaintsifi 



We cannot afford to do k9s than Ibe best. We wiN prini your 
school paper, rri^imis or profesional puiilicatioiis or 
iKwslcilers. 

TIm POST «nd StN have ■ sUlled staff of primers, artists 
and Kraphk lechnidaRS to produce qualit) puMicalioM. 

Our presses and i>pesetllR|| equipment are of the highest 
quality and our dedication f(»r excellence in reproducthin is u 
tradition. For further infrnmation and quotes ^ase call 
547-4571. 



HANDY 

CLASSIFIED 

CLIPPER 



•r waul' to aatr? A 
daaaNM ad la Hit kMl way to iMdi Mm 



for 20 
«ff iiM 



4 wMks only 9 V« vO 

(thafoiiriliwMfclBFRtE) 




POST 

SUN. 



OaaaMcattMi: 



YOUR NAME: 



D 



D 



mam 



Mali ft tw/»Mt 

P.O. lox Ittf 



W Bg^K^W ^^WW ^W^^^w "^^ p^^^^W^^ V^^H 




•^^m^m 



mmmmm 



VIRGINU BEACH SUND WEQNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1979 



Beach, blind & boat 



RaU and dove come in with bang; 
hunter safety course being offered 



■y ED LEWIS 

Vllg^ltnHg—0»H««wWHIw — — ___^^______^ 

As the weather turns cooler huniiiig season wiU open 
on a variety of game and more himt«s will be in the 
marshes and fields than on any of the sea|ons past. 

If you have a son or daughter who will be adding to 
this number or if you yourself would like to brush up on 
some of the precautions of hunting, you might consider 
a hunter safety course. 

Virginia Slate GaoM Wardca SMMy Akcn wIM be 
iBiiractlng tnch a conne at tbe Great Bridge 
ConuBVBlty CcBtcr this fan. 

The course will be held on three consecutive 
Wednesday nights at 7 p.m.. September 26, October 3. 
and October 10. For additional information call S47- 
6292. 

• • • 

Dove and rail season began this past Saturday and I 
had the priviledge of doing a little dove hunting with 
Danny McCoy of Deep Creek. We were guests on one of 
John Lindsey's fields and the hunting was excellent. We 
both got our limit, but 1 won't discuss how many shots 
it took. 

Da Monday Soaay Cappi, John SbaNer and Flint 
Koracgay wcat rail huatlBg oat of Oyster, VIrglaia and 
had aa excdicBt day. The thicc Img^ thdr Umlt of 45 
Mrdi and there were plenty left when tk^ qoH. 

Sonny and I had been watching the wind and tides 
every since Hurricane David passed and figured 
Sunday's northeaster would do the trick. The only thing 
wrong was I had a work schedule that I couldn't change 
and was unable to make the hunt . 

High tides weren't the only thing that the northeaster 
blew in. Herman Garrenger down at Harrison's Fishing 
Pier told me that the recent woBthCT has loaded the 
lower bay with plenty of spot, croiJter and flounder. 

Herman said that the spcl aic large and pier 
fishermen are catching them by the cooler full. WWe 
Mae Bowman of Norfolk caagbl the faufcit of the 
season down at HairisoB's. The dtatioa weighed hi at 
20 oa. 

Herman also told me of another angler who had real 
good luck this past week. Mr. Henry PhUUps canght 
himself a 5 lb. 6 oz. flonnder to top off hit cooler IhB of 
spot. 

Over at t^e Lynnhaven Fishing Pier, things are 
looking just as good. Junie Absalom told me that 
, anglers are catching plenty of large spot, croaker and 
tMwi- One angler caught a 1 Vi lb. p omp ano, a native 
fish of Florida. Some smaller pompano are caught here 
but not many that size. 

the northeast winds might" have helped the hunters 

and pier fishermen, but bay boaters and off-shore 

^rollers wish they had never heard of it. Rough water 

has made it to hazardous for many boats to go, 

especially off shore. 

Pat McGhee, from the Virginia Beach Sports Fishing 
Center, told me that all of their charter boats were 
booked up on Saturday and Sunday, but due to the 
strong northeast wind, they were unable to leave the 
dock. 

Down at Nags Head, surf fishermen are having some 
of the best fishing of the season and according to 
Damen Tatem the fall fishing should be even more 



prosperous. Damen, who owns and operates Tatam'i 
Tackle Shop, told me that plenty'of spot, croaker, sea 
mullet and puppy drum are in the surf. He sud that 
there are more spot down there now that they have had 
in the past eight years. Damen also told me that surf 
fishermen using sand fleas for bait are also catching 
pompano. 

On the freshwater scene things are still pretty active. 
Despite this past week's bad weather a few anglers did 
numage to do some fishing down at the Northwest River 
Camp Grounds. Otit Ndioi told me that on 
Wednesday Rowland MarshaU and W. Dean of 
Cbcttpcake went ont on the river and caaw back with 9 
ban and 35 crapplc. They ntcd hmU nlnnowi aa bait. 

Billy Tanner of Chesapeake also had pretty good luck 
this week at the Campgrounds. Billy caught a 6 lb. 5 oz. 
bass on a black jelly worm. 

Otis told me that he had three unknown gentlemen to 
stop by the other day and buy eight dozen large 
minnows. A little while later one of them came back and 
bought five more dozen. At the end of the day they 
stopped back by the Campgrounds and showed Otis 24 
nice bass they had^ught down at Bell's Island. GUI 
■aid that they had caught them by wading out from the 
shore, Instead of nsing a boat. 

A congratulations goes out to Debbie Robinson of 
Robbie's Bait and Tackle. Debbie went fishing with her 
dad, Robbie, and finally got her wish which was to out 
fish him. Debbie landed an dght pound citation bass. 
The monster was lAV* inches long and was caught at 
Back Bay. They had a total of nine bass that day. 

On Tuesday, Robbie and Debbie went fishing again 
and caught 14 bass and released all but five of the larger 
ones. They again fished at Back Bay. Why change when 
you are having such good luck? 

With tbe fall of the year approaching, some of the 
best surf fishing of the season will also arrive. I am 
really looking forward to it and have started getting my 
equipment ready. 

If you are new to snrf fishing I might have a few tips 
that can make your fishing trip a little less expensive and 
more comfortable. 

While surf fishing there will be periods of time when 
there is no action and nothing can be worse than having 
to stand and hold a rod while you are waiting for the 
fish to start biting again. 

Many surf fishermen use sand spikes which is a rod 
holder that is stuck in the sand. Most of the sand spikes 
are plastic and sell from $4.00 to $7.00 apiece depending 
on where you buy them. This can be pretty expoisiye 
especially if you want to fish two or \hjft rods 

I make my own sand spikes on 
alot cheaper, than that. IJwy n 
pipe and ait It hno tVt to ^fbot 

The first cut will Ipe on a taper sb as to nuflc^ a sharper 
point for sticking in the sand, The second cut will be 
straight through the pipe to make the top of the spike. 
By cutting in this manner you will get more spikes per 
length of pipe. 

As I said, I prefer 2" ID PVC pipe but the inside 
diametei' may be different for you. Measure the butt of 
your rod to determine the diameter you will need. 

Remember that during the fall a northeast wind can 
get pretty chilly, especially if you are on the beach. 
Always carry plenty of warm clothing even if the 
weather is comfortable when you leave home. 





PVC pipe 
" ID PVC 



*Va. Sportsman 
of the Year' 
award presented 

The first annual "Vir- 
ginia Sportsman of the 
Year" award will be pre- 
sented to Jeff Dane at the 
Norfolk In-The-Water 
Boat Show, Saturday, 
September's at 2 p.m. 
The presentation will be 
held in Volvo Penta of 
America's booth. Dane 
will be on hand to greet 
the public from 2-4 p.m. 

The "Virginia Sports- 
man of the Year" award is 
an annual award pre- 
sented by Volvo Penta to 
the person or persons that 
best typify and/or pro- • 
mote the marine environ- 
ment in the state of Vir- 
ginia. 

The award will be pre- 
sented each September 
based upon the following 
criterion: 

1. Best marine life, 
water conservation or pur- 
ification development. 

2. Best promotion or 
public interest event, mar- 
ine or boating related. 

3. Water shed or en- 
vironmental research de- 
velopments. 

4. Beach, erosion or 
tidal area develo|»naits. 

5. Marsh or wetlands 
preservation. 

6. Moorage or st(»nge 
arras - constructitm that is 
environmentally sound. 



How to handle jumping fish- 



There are three basic 
reasons why a hooked fish 
will jump. 

Some species swim'^so 
fast that when they attack 
a surface lure the momen- 
tum of their rush carries 
the fish out of the water. 

This kind of jump is the 
least problem for the 
angler because it's over 
before he knows what 
happaied. 

Some fidi panic when 
they feel the sting of a 
hook and will jump to 
escape. 

The angler has a little 
more warning, but it is 



difficult to anticipate 
when the fish will emerge. 
The best defense here is 
to lower the rod tip as the 
fish clears the surface, 
throwing slack into the 
line so the fish doesn't 
snap it. 

The most difficult jump 
situation is where the fish 
leaps in order to throw the 
lure. 

Largemouth bass are 
notorious for this tactk. 
With powerful thrusts of 
its broad taU, a large- 
mouth propels itsdf high 
above the water and vio- 
lently shakes its head to 



dislodge the lure. 

If the angler keeps a 
tight line, chances are the 
fish will break it. 

The only way out is to 
keq) a tight line as the fish 
jumps, then lower the rod 
tip and dack the line 
before the fish falls back 
into the water. 

Whether they know it or 
not, fish that jump have 
an advantage over the 
fisherman. 

Even the experts admit 
that more times than not 
the fish gains its freedom 
by jumping and tossing 
the lure. 



Maici Your Bao - Oim Bao 

A bag fllM with your housohoM dtocardt can holp a lot! 
Tha DIaablad Amarlcana of TIdowatar daaparataly naad your 
houaahoM diacarda to raiaa funda for d h a Mad Vatarana. Ilfa 
naad clothing (man'a, womon'a and chNdran'a) amall 
appHancoa, fumltura, dMiaa, hooka, toya, ruga, t.v/a, 
kitchon waraa. 



kmt About AnyUdt^'Anyikm 

Vwr DwwHoii la Tax OedudMa 

CAU4ai493a 
RM FACT OEPBIDAIU nOMIP 




Dcbbk RoMMon and her t lb. dtntfon 

FREEDOM — 

from page 9 

today with the story of what followed, beyond saying 
that Arthur was executed at the age of 21 and I was 
imprisoned and tortured for 16 months before being 
finally released to rejoin the partisans. By the end of the 
war I was commissioned a Captain in the Belgian 
resistance and worked at the front lines as liaison 
between the first Canadian Army and Belgian Partisans. 
I tell you all of this only so that you will know that I 
too have shared the feeling of setting foot on American 
soil, for what seemed to me the first time, and I too have 
shared the feeling of wonder at the difference betw'een 
my life here and that which I experienced as I grew up in 
another land. Above all, I know the proud feding of 
knowing that I am an American Citizen . 

If I could impart to all of you one thought, one 
message, today, it would be to cherish your citizoiship 
and the country of which you are now a voting member. 
Further, I would urge you with all my heart to take an 
active part in the voting process not only every four 
years when the Presidential Campaigns draw your 
attention, but every time any person is elected to 
represent you, be it a State Representative, a Governor, 
a Senator or a Congressman. Each one of these people 
are like wheels in a clock. If one of them is wrong, the 
eventual effect can be to jam the mechanism . 

Those of us who have lived in this country most of 
our lives have seen tremendous change take place. While 
some change is necessary to avoid stagnation, change 
for its own sake can and often is wrong. Some of the 
changes in recent years have brought with them 
tremendous problems both social and political. 

They are changes inflicted on an apathetic public 
which has lost hope and lost interest in their political 
system. Insidious bills are slipped in by Congress, the 
press touts causes, which the people, who have not 
taken the time to research, accept at face value and now 
we see the results. 

Today, America is a country shaken by internal 
problons and self doubt. But there is a way out and you 
people here today can play a tremendous role in this 
reblffflToT America, if only you wiU takrthVtlmeai5d" 
put forth the effort. 

Changing countries once in one's Hfethne is 
traumatic. The adjustments are often hard. In this case 
however, the rewards can far outweigh the difficulties,^^ 
for America is truly the land of opportunity. 

Having come here to find that opportunity and the 
freedom to pursue it, I know that each and evoyone of 
you will be anxious to preserve the way of life tjut you 
came here to find. 

On this happy day I wish to cast no black cloud over 
your celebration, but I would like to remind you all of 
some very famous words.. .."The price of Freedom is 
Eternal Vigilance". America comes to you with no 
guarantees. If you would have freedom and plenty you 
must pay the price to preserve it. I appeal to you to 
think before you embrace any political or social cause. 
Think, not only of what it miglu mean for you, but also 
of what it might mean to others both now and in the 
future. Be wary>pf setting precedents, for when one 
man's rights take away uiother man's rights, both 
become meaningless. Laws once written are difficult to 
unwrite and constitutional amendments are virtually 
impossible to remove once enacted. 

In this country, we have prided ourselves on the lack 
of government interference in our lives. That too is 
changing and it is up to you as much as every other 
American citizen to decide how far you will permit it to 
go. The burden is heavy, the rewards as I have said 
before, can be great. To aU of you, then, I wish you 
welcome, I wish you success, I wish you happiness and I 

leave you now with this thought 

As one who knows the feeling of having lost her 
Andean freedom and dc^esn't take freedom for 
grai^....C'est lorsquon a perdu la liberte que Ion en 
con'nait le prix. It is only after we have lost our freedom 
do we appreciate its value. 
I congratulate each of you here today. 



/ 



3»«^ 



■% 



MARINE REPAIR 



FUUUNEtniVICE 

THiLrttmuviNBOArwoiHtsDeFA/inieMr . 



^-...V 



MARINE R/ULWAY 



WOOD, METAL A nBERaUSS 



ONUNWcanit 



ONUNNCREEH ilOa it AAA 

2102 N.QREAT NECK ROAD 40A-09U9 



4^i^ 



COMniTEUNE- PARTS 
AACCESSMWES 

iNSaHINTPMKS 

usTaMSTiMmtnD 

AUtOPAKTS 

Mani"rit Wi 
Sitedqri-S 
SandiylM 



112 fM MmM M. ^7101 
401tfiranhySt C»4666 



Refuge hunt ''quaHfications'* set 

Weapons proficiency qualifications for Mtablishing 
eligibility for the dut hunt at IXsmal Swamp National 
Wildlife Refuge will be hdd Saturday, SqptembCT IS, on 
the refuge. Refuge Kfamager Ralph Keel has announced. 

According to Kcti, Re^m V, U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
ServiM requires that hunten participating in refuge 
hunts must demonstrate thdr proficiency with their 
wnpon prior to being selected fbr the hunt. 

Therefore, in an effort to make sure everyone who 
wishes to participate in the drawing for permits has a 
chance to qualify, refuge pCTSonnel will conduct 
qualifications on Septonber 15, between the hours of 8 
a.m. and S p.m. on the Jericho Lane entrance into the 
refuge. 

Hunters will have to furnish their own weapons and 
ammunition. 

Late season boating 



There's usually plenty 
of fine boating weather 
left after Labor Day sig- 
nals the official end of 
summertime. 

In many ways it is 
excellent boating, some- 
time really the best of the 
year. 

The sun isn't so hot, 
many insects start to dis- 
appear, the air is brighter 
and clearer, and midsum- 
mer's mugginess and 
thunderstorms have dimi- 
nished markedly. 

There's less traffic on 
the water, so you cap relax 
more and enjoy the free- 
dom that comes when 
operating on wide-open 
clear waters. 

Due to the appreciable 
drop-off in the volume of 
business and the return of 
young pe(^Ie to school 
and college, many boat- 
yards can no longer keep 
full-time attendants on 



their gas docks. 

So su stops might take 
longer, despite the re- 
duced amount of water 
traffic. , 

And once in a while, 
you'll find that a gas dock 
is only open on weekends. 

So heed this word of 
caution from boating ex- 
perts. 

Before setting out on a 
long water trip, ask 
around or even phone 
ahead to find out if you'll 
be able to get gas easily at 
the places you intend to 
visit. 

Since^ there are fewer 
boats on the wata, it's 
well to remember that if 
you get into any kind of 
trouble it may take longer 
for help to come along. 

Make sure your rig is in 
dependable condition and 
has aboard all needed 
safety items. 




WE'LL 
HELP YOU 
GET THE 
JUMP ON 
WHITER! 

481-6401 



VWSHCIALIST8 



AUTO PARTS 

i568-A-MIUDAMRD. 

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 

MON-SAT 



tfSL 



air 



O F VI RG I N I A 



FUN-O-RAMA" 



CONTeSTS 



' PERFORMINQARTS 



FRefOnNdstaiidi 



• toidyShow- 
iStamplayShov 



6HEATEST LIVESTOCK SHOW IM THE EAST/ ISrBli?''*'" 
S.OOOHe«t Uw M tock - 1.000 Hofees / SWNICAK 
450epwtmentsUv«MecK«Ki /Arawd nw WMd ki 

County Evtry 0«y. 



SPECIAL ATraAGTI«B ^3fg£ 



JUMOR OLYMPICS wMl BROOKS nOaMBON 
S^onMrad by WRNL MM CTOmi 01 - m, S«pt 2e 

mSLVaAV AND QREAT PAPER f>UME OONTEST 
spQiitorao by W^VA nftdto "* ^^ 8i^ 21 

XL- 1 K DATE raOHT - mwiAy, Stpl 20 - Buy rid* ml DM* Mm tTM 
SI M ConMrt "SKw BulM Tlweiy" - a « 1 P.M. 

0«4 CONCERT MQHT - Concwt Md ril rid*« tor SSXX) 
7 Pid. una MHnitM Sun.. S*pl 23 

WST AMATEUR ■jU@3mS8#»MLS-^?«E-Moa, Sapt 24 



QREAT VnOIMA BALUXM RACE - FREE 
FM^tndSalunl^, Sapt 29-30. 

BW)«VEI8B^ayOKMLES- raS - Sapt 20-26 



^ Naw Acts tor 1979 — FREE StMringRoy^ European Circus 



RACEWAY 
EVBIT8 ^^ 

jm CMnWWO Thrill Show-S«pi. 21 22-23 

JACK MKHMAN'S Hell Drlver»- 

S^ 2S-29-N 

TRMTM PUlLllie-An Clats«s-S^.22 



BRIGGS FBANKS »FIC1AL STATE FAIR 
HOTDOG 5 wr^pars for mi admission. 



Whi ■ Trip to Disnty WorM tor pictuns 
« SM Fair Also 10 ottitr prizos irartti 
SJ.SM In Fn Rtolo Contasl. 



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SERIALS SECTION 

VA STATE I'Jf ^«!^2i9 
RICHMOND VA 232tv 



^ 







Gspe Henry Light 



53rd year, No. 38, Va. Beack, Va. 



Vusink BeadrSim 

^^ The Official Newspaper of Virginia Beach 

Wednesday, September 19, 1979 




One section — 15 cents 



Beach professional boxing 

Acey - Haymen 
rematch at Dome 



By PAM VANDEVEER 

VIHliili Bwcli San Ediior 

The long-awaited re- 
match of local boxing 
talent Bobby Acey and 
world-ranked AlfoiBo 
Haymen will be the high- 
light of the Virginia Beach 
professional boxing card 
Thursday night, Sept. 20. 
Billed as "Rocky II," the 
scheduled 10-round maio 
event will conclude a five- 
flght card that will begin 
at the Dome at 8 p.m. Ed 
Owens and Jerry Martin 
I are promoting the event. 

Bobby "Rocky" Acey, 
whose record is IS knock- 
outs in 16 fights, lost to 
Haymen by a technical 
knockout nine months ago 
at the Dome. Haymen at 
that time w^s 13th 'ranked 
welterweight in the world. 
Acey broke his right band 
in the second round of 



that fight, but continued 
boxing until 49 seconds 
into the second roimd 
when the referee stopped 
the fight due to blood 
flowing from a cut on top 
of Acey's head. The 
broken hand was the same 
one Acey had broken in 
May of 1978. 

Ilie fa^uries kept Acey 
out of 4he ring until last 
month's showing at the 
Dome, when he knocked 
out opponent Johnny Barr 
in the second round of a 
scheduled 8-round bout. 
That fight was to be a 
warm-up session for 
Thursday's battle with 
Haymen, but turned out 
to be a little short for the 
28-year-old Acey's liking. 

But Acey, who says his 
once injured hand is now 
"super," wasn't the only 
one pttpni§$ for the 
Haymea roMtch that 




Alfonso Haymen, worid-nwkcd wdlerwtiglit, wn ia 
Vii^inia Beac6 last noatb to ttdw In Ac^'s mo«t recent 
victory. 



Drug treatment center 
opposed by neighbors 



Residents of Virginia 
Beach apparently find it 
hard to reach out to a 
Sustance Abuse Outreach 
Center and Alcohol Treat- 
ment Program in their 
neighborhood. 

A proposed relocation 
of the center from Atlan- 
tic Avenue and First 
Colonial Road to the 22nd 
Street city library building 
was denied on April 23 
when area residents ob- 
jected to having the center 
in their neighborhood. 

A new proposal to 
locate the centra* at the 
Birchwood Office Park 
immediately off Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, also met 
with opposition Monday 
afternoon from the Birch- 
wood Civic League. 

As a result, Virginia 
Beach City Council 
deferred the matter to 
Oct. 15 so that center 
officials and Birchwood 
residents could meet Oct. 
4 at the civic league 
meeting to discuss alterna- 
tives. 

Col. Craig Tyrrell, 
speaking on bdialf of the 
league, said the league was 
oppo^ to the relocation. 
He said that the coiter 



would be 50 to 100 yards 
from single family resi- 
draoes and dose to the 
Malibu aiKi Thalia Ele- 
mentary Schools and 
Princess Anne High 
School He talked about 
"tuniing innocents into 
ncthns of a drug culture. " 
He said the piUients would 
be mingling in the neigh- 
borhood while waiting for 
treatment. 

He had a petition with 
the signature of 269 resi- 
dents in opposition to a 
"drt^ cato' in their 
neighb<»lMod." 

Councilman Donald 
Merrick suggested the 
Milk»-'s DqMtftment Store 
which is bdng used to 
consolidate other city 
activities. 

Councilman Dr. 
QMtoot A Holland said 
"Ttese pa^ are not all 
thiu l»d. They have a 
fvpMem and Uwy are not 
alwi^ trying to encourage 
people to tidce it (drup). 
These pec^ile are not 
selling. They are trying to 
get b^. Ymi am find just 
as 4s$tkaMe pec^le going 
into hospitab and doctors 
offt:« m h»e." 




) , 

Utility line fees reduced 

for hotels, upped for apartments 



AlfoMo Hayaca beat Bobby Acey by a technical 
knockout in the flcventli roand of their flgtat held nine 
months ago at the Dome. 



night. Alfonso "Apollo" 
Haymen himself was 
down from Philadelphia, 
Pa., toHake in the action. 

"Acey's a good puncher. 
He comes to fight," com- 
mented Haymen before 
Acey's bout with Barr. 
"His left hook is his best 
pimch." 

The 30-year.old Hay- 
men turned to pro boxing 
at the age of 22 after 
coming out of the^^my. 
He has boxed in Aust- 
ralia. Lcmdim. and Italy, 
tniiiiPi n fiin»lnnw> and . 
has been ranked as fa^ as 
dghth in the world. His 
record stands at 20-16-4. 

Calling boxing a gladia- 
tor sport, he said he works 
out two hours a day, six 
days a week. His last fight 
was in May in Norway. 

"A lot of fighters today 
are tall," remarked the 
five-foot-eleven boxer. 
"Acey's height may be to 



his disadvantage. But he's 
a good fighter." 

Also to be featured in 
Thursday night's lineup is 
a contest for the Virginia 
heavyweight champion- 
ship title betweo) Leroy 
Boone of Virginia Beach 
and Bobby Jordan of 
Norfolk. 

Ticket information can 
be obtained by calling 
4284000. 




Virginia Beach boxing 
promoter Ed Owens. 



Mobile home ordinance 
under councU scrutiny 

Virginia Beach City Council seems to want to put 
mobile homes back in mobile home parks with ifo 
exceptions. 

At an informal meeting Monday afternoon, council 
agreed to consider repeal of two sections of the mobile 
home ordinance which provide for exceptions. 

City Manager George L. Hanbury said that there is an 
increasing number of people requesting to live in mobile 
homes. He attributed the increase to higher interest 
rates and higher building costs. 

He said that problems wiU be created if exemptions 
are continued and that mobile homes should be in some 
kind of planned community. 

Exemptions provide for mobile homes in agricultural 
zones for farm employees and in hardship cases. At the 
formal council meeting later, council turned down a 
request by Laura Adams for a nK>bile home on her 
property for a niece aiKl her husband to live in until 
their home is built. 

The request, which had previously been defeated by a 
6-S vote, was up for reconsideruion at the r«|uest of 
Councilman Donald Merrick. Merrick, who had voted 
against the request previously asked for 
reconsideration, he said, becauM all but one of those in 
(^position did not live on adjoining i^operty or across 
the street. He also pointed out that Maury Riganto, the 
only property owner notified, under the law, who 
objected, would have his property divided by a road. 
Merrick said that 9S.6 acres would be on one side, that 
another six acres would adjoin Mrs. Adams property, 
and another 4.6 acres would also be a separate parcel. 

Merrick moved to allow Mrs. Adams a use permit for 
a mobile home fot two years ~ Mra. Adams had 
originally r^uested one for an indefinite period until a 
home for her niece was built. 

Voting against the motion and for deniiil were 
Councilmcn Geor^ R. Perrell, J. Curtis Payne Jr., 
R.L. Rigp, Vice Mayor J. Hway M^oy Jr., and 
Councilwomen Meyera Oberndorf and ftirbara Henley. 

Voting for the motion and agidnat (tenial were 
Coundlmen Donald Merrick, Reid Ervin and Clarence 
A. H^iind and Mayor Patrick L. Standing. 

Set MOBILE HOME, page 6 



Hotel and motel utility line fees have been reduced 
and apartment line fees generally have been increased 
under ordinances approved Monday afternoon by 
Virginia Beach City Couricil. 

The changes, contained in six ordinances, arc 
intended to establish a more equitable system of fees, 
according to city Manager George L. Hanbury. 

However, C.G. Harris, president of the Tidewater 
Builders Association, claims that the cost saved by 
motels and hotels was being passed on to apartments. 

Roy Bartholomew, of 908 Ballylinn Road, wanted 
council to "defer all the ordinances until all the citizens 
get the same treatment you are offering motels." 

The new rates are based on minimum line fees for 
single-family dwellings which will remain the same. At 
present, rates are based on the number of units per acre. 
The new rates are based on the number of units without 
regard to the acreage with motel and hotel units and 
apartment units assigned feeds representing a 
proportionate share of a single family residential unit 
line fee. The proportion is figured on the average 
consumpton rate attributed to the various type units in a 
state standards study. 

The study shows that single family use of water and 
sewer is greater than either hotel and motel or 
apartments and that apartment use is greater than hotel 
and motel. 

Average daily use comes to 350 gallons for single- 
family units, 249 gallons for apartment units and 218 a 
day for hotel and motel units. As a result the line fees 
are based on 71.4 percent of the single family fee for 
apartments and 61.2 percent of the single family fee for 
ho els and motels. 

At present the single family line fee for sewer is $500 
and for water $780, and for the developer who is putting 
in his own lines, $150 and $190 respectively. 

Hanbury said that a 246-unit apartment complex on 
20 acres of land would cost $39,700 in line fees under 
the old rate and $88,560 under the new, an increase of 
,^60 or 123 percent. The developer, under the new 
rates, would have to pay only $24,600, less than the 
present fee on a per unit basis. 

UttiW theolff i^tlf systenf, Wsm W/efmfdta i6- 
unit hotel on .5 acre of land would come to $24,000 
while the same fees now would cost $17,360. 



added that since the apartment fees were of no concern 
to bond interests, there was no point in increasing them. 
Revenues from motels and hotels were not included to 
insure the sale of water and sewer bonds. 

Hanbury pointed out that fees for hotels and motels 
and apartments were calculated on the same basis. He 
said that there is a substantial increase only when the 
city puts in the utility and that the city wants to 
encourage the developer to put in his own utility lines. 

City Councilman Reid Ervin pointed out that some 
apartments pay only $311 a unit "and I have to pay 
$780 for a single- family home." He said apartment 
owners pay $311 for a line fee while "a guy across the 
street who may have only a one bathroom and one 
bedroom house has to pay $780. 

"Those people who live in apartments are the citizens 
usually less able to afford it^" Harris said. 

Harris asked whether consideration had been given to 
the number of feet in the line serving the various types 
of units. 

Ervin said that the "fiow" was the only fair way to 
assess fees. 

Hanbury said the new fees will not cost a developer of 
an apartment complex more, wher ethe developer in his 
own lines it will actually reduce his cost. 

See LINE FEES, page 12 



Inside this weelc 

Arts and entertainment 4 

Church news 2 

Classified 13 

Commentary -^ 6 '^ 

Consumer interests .5 

Happenings 2 

Lawn and garden ^. ■.:..8-9 

Legal notices, 10-12 

Real estate 7 

Water sports. |4 



A 40-unit hotel on .8 acre of land which paid $14,000 
for water line under the old rates, would now pay 
SI2,400. 

Motel and hotel fees were based on a sliding scale 
with the per unit fee increasing with the density. 

Harris said that no one mentioned that the fees for 
those who are least able to afford it will be increased ~ 
the apartment dweller will be burdened with increases 
that will make building less attractive. He said that he 
applauded the efforts of council to reduce the line fees 
for motels because they are a necessary part of the 
economy of Virginia Beach. He noted, however, that 
the increases for some apartments will be over 100 
percent. 

Harris pointed out that he served on the committee 
which set up the fee system, and "now we begin to 
tamper with that document. I agree the hotel and motel 
owners have axes to grind, but 1 don't believe this is the 
time to do it." He said the changes shift the burden on 
another segment. He said that apartments have not been 
built jn Virginia Beach for two years and that builders 
will now look only toward building subsidized 
apartments. 

He said the cost will be passed on the consumers. He 



King Neptune ends reign 
with good feelings for Beach 

Sidney S. Kellam, who entered into the role of King 
Neptune reigning over the Neptune Festival with some 
misgivings, came out of it with a lot of good feeling for 
the City of Virginia Beach. 

"1 did not enter into it with as much enthusiasm as 1 
should,'' he told City Council Monday afternoon. But 
after his experience he decided, "Our heritage was great 
but our future is much better. 

"We live in a city that's so large that sometimes we 
get caught up in the little areas in which we live." 

Among the things he saw during his reign were 
nursing homes (which were uplifting because of the 
facilities), day care homes, Mt. Trashmore and 
basketball-on-wheels. "1 went in feeling sad for those 
people on wheels and came out feeling proud that they 
had courage and intensity to play the way they did." 

He also spoke of square dancing ("whatever kind it 
was it was colorful") that takes children off the streets 
and Heritage day which attracted 100.000 people. 




Getting into clay 



IM yoo ever want to Uy yoar iuuid at day? FaB ^isa airf workshops for all i«cs at the Vhginia BcKh Arts CMto> 
■re stortfag the flrrt week In October. An open hoase wH be bM there at 1711 Arctic Avennc wi Santey, S^ta|*« 
90, frmn 2 to 5. Tochers wM be deaoastnitlnt evn^rtU^ from tapntry to bodtmaklni, from Hfe liinwli^ to 
■wv te mnkli^. from poetry to watcrcotor and oils. Yon en ^i up at the open bovsc for the class of yvn < 
For ^n taf ormatf on caH the arts center at 428-9294. 



:«-^. ?^^1 



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2 VIRGINU BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19. 1979 



" « 



Virginia Beach 
happenings 

NWCA Tidewater Area Coundl ineets 

The bimonthly meeting of the Navy Wives 
Clubs of America Tidewater Area Council will be 
held Thursday, September 20, 7 p.m. in the 
classroom of the Division "I" Building on NAS 
Oceana in Virginia Beach with NWCA Princess 
Anne #143 acting as hostess club. 

Refreshments will be provided; no nursery 
facilities are available. A Mystery Auction will be 
hdd also. For further information, contact Phyllis 
Hunt at 482-4062. This meeting is an open 
invitation to all wives of Navy, Marine Corps, and 
Coast Guard enlisted personnel. 

Beta Sigma Phi chapter 
plans September meeting 

Xi Alpha ZeU chapter of Beta Sigma Phi will 
meet in the home of Gwen Stace of Virginia Beach 
on September 20 at 7:30 p.m. to discuss the final 
details of the hayride for members and their 
escorts planned for Sept. 22 at the Indian Point 
Stables in Suffolk. 

A cultural program on different types of cheese 
entitled "Cheese From Around the World" will be 
presented by Ruth Casher from Hickory Farms. A 
tour of Hickory Farms will be scheduled for a 
later date. 

After the business meeting, refreshments will be 
served. 



Democratic family process 
reviewed by discussion group 

Family Service/Travelers Aid is offering a new 
program. Building on S.T.E.P., for parents who 
have completed the Systematic Training for 
Effective Parenting. Parents will meet Friday 
mornings, September 21 through October 26 from 
10 to 1 1 :30 at Family Service/Travelers Aid, 222 
West 19th Street, Norfolk. 

Katie Brown, Family Enrichment Specialist, 
will lead th e disc ussions where parents will review 
their commrtment to the democratic family 
process. For more information and registration, 
call Katie Brovlla at 622-"7on:'" "~ " 



Cemanled^parents groap 
plans weekly meetings 

Raising Other People's Children, a group 
designed for renuuried parents, will be offered by 
Family Service/Travelers Aid Monday evenings 
September 24 through October 29 from 7 to 9 
p.m. Katie Brown, Family Enrichment Specialist, 
will lead the group at the Norfolk office, 222 West 
19th Street. 

The group will offer parents and step-parents an 
opportunity to examine their new family roles 
during a period of readjustment. T^e cost is SIS 
for individuals and S25 for couples. For more 
information and registration, call Katie Brown at 
622-7017. 



Veterans Advisory Committee 
to meet September 24 

The Veterans Advisory Committee will meet on 
Monday, September 24, at 7:30 p.m. at the offices 
of WoodUwn Memorial Gardens, 6309 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. Norfolk. This will be the second 
meeting of the Veterans Advisory Committee to 
help consummate jdans for Veterans Day 1979 
service and parade, sponsored by the Ameriom 
Legion, Second District, to be held on Monday, 
November 12. The American Legion, Second 
District, extends an invitation to all the different 
veterans organizations and their auxiliaries to be 
represented at this meeting. For further 
information, contact Ms. Faye Hoover, Veterans 
Advisory Committee secretary, at 461-4054. 

Adam Thoroughgood chapter DAR 
meets September 20 

The Adam Thoroughgood chapter of DAR will 
hold the SeiKembo^ 20 meeting at the home of I>. 
Ann McDonald. Sea Gate Colony, 2830 Shore 
Drive, Virginia Beach at 7:30 p.m. Mrs. C.R. 
Harrison will be co-hostess. Mrs. Hilary Brashear 
will present a National Defense program on Salt 
II. 



Church plans annual bazaar 

The Norview United Methodist Church's 
Annual Bazaar will be held Saturday. September 
29, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. TTie church is located 
at Fl 12 Norview Avenue, Norfolk. 

Items to be sold include needlework, 
woodcrafts, toys, plants, and all-seasons 
dea>ratkMis. Hiere will also be a garage and attic 
sale, Mcery, and children's rides. 

A turkey dinno* will be served from 5 to 8 p.m. 
Tickm are $3.25 fOT adulu and $1.73 for 
children. Then wiU be a free nursery for children 
under thr«. 



A true story of a lonely man 



By REV. W. LEE TRUMAN 



Joe was bom in Dublin and christened with the name 
of Joseph M. Scriven. He boasted that he was the man 
who never trusted anybody, and often said that God's 
gift to him was his suspicious nature. 

Joe never joined any group, nor was he ever known to 
do anything just for the fun of it. No one, after his 
death, could recall that he had one childhood or adult 
acquaintance whom he could have called a friend. 

What was so wrong with Joe Scriven? He is now 
dead, but we can only guess as we look into his past at 
what so soured Joe on life. Maybe it was an embittered 
parent or someone else who had only been left with 
wrKkage and heart^he in life that made him feel 
everyone and everything was against him. 

Joe became dissatisfied with Dublin and set out to 
seek a new world and his fortune in Canada. 
Undoubtedly he was lonely where he came from, but 
maybe the newness of his surrondings and the 
strangemess of the people caused him to suffer from 
humanity's most common disease even more intensely. 
At any rate, he was still lonely, afraid of making 
friends, and then it happened. He suddenly fell in love. 

She was lovely, lively and exciting, a very umfsual 
creature to be found in a primitive pioneering town. He 
totally committed himself to this wonderful newfound 
meaning in his life. 

Joe changed. He forgot the distrust at which he had 
been so skillful, and he gave to her his total self. Joe's 
life centered on the hope of having her become his wife. 

But hCT promise was not kept. She took the fnry to 
buy her trousseau, and returning across the bay with her 
wading clothes on the eve of their wedding, was lost 
along with aU hands in a sudden, violent storm. 

Joseph Scriven was alone like he had never been alone 
in the world before. He made sure that the world would 
never hurt him again. He carried inside himself a pain 
which was like an unhealable wound. 

Pain can sometimes be too great for human strength 
to bear, yet where could he turn? The only person he 
had ever called friend in his life was gone. In his total 
agony, he fell on his knees and cried out to God as only 
man in mortal pain can. He wept in the darkness of his 
room for long hours that night. 

He said when he was on his knees he felt God come to 
him. When he got up, he felt both weak and dazed. He 




Let's 
talk 



put on his hat and started down the sttirs of the 
boarding house in whidi he lived. At the bott(Hn of the 
stairs there was gathered a poup of people — the time 
clerk from the second floor front, the s|»nster who was 
dways crocheting in the parlm^, the secretary to the 
mayor and one laidy with a ntiat risque rqiutation. 
They were all there and readied o<4 to Joe to give him 
what reassurance th^ could . <□ 

With that gathering was a Methodist circuit rider who 
took Joe by the arm and led him to the village cafe. Joe 
Scriven said how amand he was to find how much 
sympathy there was in the world, and how mudi 
friendship there was around him. diidding him like a 
coat in a bitter cold wind. 

Here's the twist. No one had ever considered Joe 
Scriven as being either rdigious or concerned with the 
church. There is nothing to indicate that Joe had any 
ability or skill at being able to give comfort or 
consolation to a single person, yet he had a vision of 
courage and friendship to offer to millions of grieving 
people. 

Joe Scriven, shattered by his loss and yet deepened by 
the experience, took his belongbifs and went to the poor 
section of town and left them on the doorstq» of 
persons he considered less fortunate than himsdf. He 
spent the rest of his life in that community cutting wood 
for the stoves for the poor widows and the sick people 
who were unable to pay. It was said that often he gave 
away his warm clothing to those who were cold. 

One night by kerosene light, he wrote a hymn that is 
still sung in countless dburches vound the world: 
"What a Friend we have in Jesus, ... all our sins and 
griefs to bear. Vi^t a privilege to carry everything to 
God in prayer. ..." 



More happenings 

Norfolk - Virginia Beach Expressway 
Study Commission holds hearing 

The Norfolk-Virginia Beach Expressway Study 
Commission, chaired by Delegate Glenn B. 
McClanan of Virginia Beach, will hold a public 
hearing on Wednesday, September 26, at 7:30 
p.n^ in the Virginia Beach City Council 
Chambers. Topics of discussion will include 
possible improvements in commuter ticket 
procedures, interest rates and investment of the 
expressway funds, inclusion of the expressway 
into the interstate system, and beautiflcation and 
maintenance projects. • 

Constructive ideas and opinions about all 
aspects of the expressway will be welcomed by the 
commission. Anyone wishing to reserve speaking 
time or to have additional information about the 
meeting should contact Gayle Nowell, Division of 
Legislative Services, P.O. Box 3-AG, Richmond, 
23208 or call (804)786-3391. 

State welfare of fleers hold 
annual meeting at Beach 

The 1979 Annual Meeting of the National 
Conference of Stote Welfare Officers will be held 
at the Shmtton Beach Inn at Virginia Beach from 
Sunday, September 23, through Thursday, Sept. 
27. 

William L. Lukhard, Commissioner of the 
Virginia Departinoit of Welfare, will welcome the 
conferees at the opening session on Monday, Sept. 
24. The keynote address will be delivered by 
Frederick M. Bohen, Assistant Secretary for 
Managemoit and Budget, U.S. E>epartment of 
Health, Education, and Welfare. 

Owen Pickett, a member of the Virginia House 
of Del^ates, will be the featured luncheon 
speako-at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26. 



Knights of Columbus officers elected 



The newly elected officers of the Father Nicholas J. 
Habets Assembly of the Fourth Degree Knights Of 
CoIumbusTVir^nia Beach, are: ™— ^ 

Faithful Navigator, SK. James J. Burke; Faithful 
Captain,'^. Claremont J. CliftonrFdiiif\il Pilots SK. 
JCevm J. McGrath; Faidiful Adaiiral^'Past Faithful 
Navigator Charles E. MurellO; Faithful Sdribe, SK. 



D.W. Arthofer; Faithful Comptroller, Past Faithful 
Navigator Arthur W. Pearsall; Faithful Purser, SK. 
FrankOn A. DunhrFliaifuI Tffinir Sait£n<d, SK. FiOT 
A. Chebetar; Faithful Outor Sentinel. SK. Arthur G. 
O'Brien; Faithful 3 Year Trustee. Past Faithful 
Navigator Thomas C. Shoemaker; Appointed as 
Faithful Friar was Father Alfred Orot^nger O.S.B. 



Beta Sigma Phi raises money thru Sept. projects 



L To raise money for 
purchasing song-birds for 
the Telephone Pioneers' 
Blind Children's Easter 



1980. Xi Alpha Zeta chap- 
ter of Beta Sigma Phi sold 
McDonald's orangeade, 
potato chips and pretzels 



parade at the Dome's 
parking lot on Friday, 
September 7. 



tember, Brenda Rhea and 
Diana Pettit delivered 
baked goods to the Tide- 
wittCT Rehabilitation Insti- 



Egg Hunt in the spring of after the Neptune Festival For the month of Sep" tute's Leisure Lounge. 




ON TEUVISION WEEKLY!!! 

THE ROCK CHURCH 
OF VA. BEACH 

EVERY 

SATURDAY EVENING 

10K10P.M.0NCSN 

CHANNEL 27 

• A MWISTIIY OF COD'S WORD 

• OUIST SPEAKERS 

• SKOAL MUSIC 

'mmmoMWHkTimLoimn^Bmjim'' 

The Rock dwrcli it ImiM atMO KMipsville Rd./ 
Virgiiiia Rtach wHh Smdiy SwvicM S.*00 an. A 10:30 
a.n. and Ew^M Servicet 7:30 p4i. 

MfvdMMtoy Strvfett 10:30 a.m. A 7:30 p.m. 

THREE NOT UNES: 467-6802, 467-6603, 

467-4387 



Bayside Motors 

4747 SlMft Drive 444-4563 
CiMritsC. Hale. Sr. and StaH 

Haynes Furnituro ComiMny 

U24 Vhfhda leach Boulevard 
Fundtwe-Bodding-Carpoti^ 

Rosewood Memorial Park 

631 WKcMock Road 497-8925 
CCKiriuMtrick 

Engineering Media, Inc. 

606 R-Uborty street 
CharlM Hackurortii and Staff 



ChaHie's Seafood Restaurant 

3139 Skon Drive 491-9863 
mUty E«' Ronpelt and Employoos 

KeHam-Eaton insurance Co. 

3111 Pacific Avemie 428-9161 

Overton's Market 

1419 Pokidoxtor Street 545-9496 
The Overtoas and Enirioyoet 

Mill-End Carpet Shop 

4740 Virghiia leach Bhrd. 497-4654 
Taylor 8. Cwr Md Employeei 

Furniture Showrooms 

' 828 LUttle Creek Road 
2981 S> MHitary Hiihway 
Sondy 8oNr M^ Eaiployeot 

Andy's Plumbing and Heating 

1003 Canal Drive 485-5000 
State-Rofittered-Noii and OM Worii 

Nempsville Pharmacy 



Levels... 



Uvois..4tlnysood 
OodplMrtidhillMniMi; 

6 w^VW^^H^V ■H8^F V^VoV^H V 

Ami mdioo a pami UwL 

Livois»< 
Mslwi 

Levi it Um ifftdivOf 
Most Ckilst'lko way of al 

Lovo is>Mnot rosaMMf 
rOflwqr ioi|ivoSf 
H hti—a awot ka— loaoa 
To tkoso unlk wkasi n Rvos« 

Love it«»ovor ptMmt 
Ifti 
Hill 
TkofhiottofaRartsI 

Uvo..Jhotfcoiitbkia- 
Htkhwioiiiaodndbid, 
Hi 

Aim I 

Love iiualho I 
Socaro In Fathar't cara, 
FOr 6od it iMI^rty 

ntm wvo 10 ovav/wnafwi 
Ms tovo is ovofywkafoi' 



III 






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Willis Furniture at Hilltop 

1712 UskkiRaod 428-9951 
L*N. Bwiis aid Stiff 

Price's lipcorporated 

4580 Poii*r«ko MaN 497-4821 
Brand Name AppHancos-TV-Storoo 

Home Federal Savings 
and Loan ASSN. 

1635 Laskki Road 4264327 
300-ANorlkBattlofialdBlvd. . 

Todd Electric Company 

Nonry and Mosos Todd and staff 

Preston's Pharmacy 

1401 Pokidoxtar Stnot S45-7337 

JaMOSLa I 

Chesapeake Savings and Loan 

Frank N. Wood and Associates 



Southern States 
Chesapeake Assn., Inc. 

1764 S. MHary NWnray 420-1841 

J.D. Miles and Sons, Inc. 

J.D. IMos, Jr. and AMO^tes 

Kellam and Eaton hic. 
BuikMig^pplies 

Prineoss Amm Station 427-3200 

W.L "Billy" Rhodes 

1231 Laorri A va nao . CkM a piak e 
4204108, 424-579 

Home Federal Savhigs and Loan Assn. 



^^t^mw^^v» 



% ^m m^iwmpimmmm w * » w^mm^mfm im^^rt^ 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 19. 1979 3 



Betty Ciampoli is Teacher of the Year 



\ 



Woodstock ElemeDtary 
teacher Mn. Mary Eliza- 
beth (Betty) CiampoU is 
the 1960 Virgiiiia Beach 
Teacher of the Year. 

A special committee 
sdected Mrs. Ciampoli, 
29. friMn among those 
mMDinated f rcun eadi Vir- 
^nte Beach public sdiool. 
Each of tlw nominees was 
chosen by fellow teasers. 

Mrs. OanqMli will re- 
I^eseot Vi^nia Beach in 
the state-wide Teadier of 
the Year ccmipetition this 
fall. Hie competition is 
oo-qwnsored by the En- 
cyclopedia Britannica 
Corporation and the 
Ladies' Home Journal. 
Lut year, Virginia 
Beach's teacher of the 
year, Sandra Bowie, was 
selected as Virginia's 
teacher of the year, and 
she took part in the na- 
tional competition. 

Betty, as she is known 
to friends and co-teadiers, 
holds a master's an(i 
badhdw's degree in ele- 
mentary education, both 
from Old Dominicm Uni- 
versity. 

She has been teaching 
(ifUi grade at Woodstock 
for<»the past sevoi years, 
and is enthusiastically in- 
vdved as a teadier and 
student advisor. 

Her idiilosophy reflects 
her canoan for her stu- 
dents. She beeves each 
child is unique aiui should 
be encouraged to develop 
to the height of his poten- 
tial in all areas - academi- 
cally, emotionally, physi- 
cally, and socially. 

"I hope to iRovide the 
student with skills, know- 
ledge, and enthusiasm for 
learning which wiU uhi- 
matefy allow him to sue- 




iseacii eaucation 



School lunch menu 



ceed as a worthwhile in- 
dividual in our society." 
she says. 

Woodstock principal 
Mrs. Lou Royal says what 
makes Betty such a good 
teacher is that she always 
gives a child a positive 
feding, never a negative 
feding. "She is able to 
make each child feel 
imp<»tant - that they have 
sMMthing to contribute^'^'^ 



Mn. Betty CtampoH 

says Mrs. Royal. "As a 
result, Betty has very little 
disdpline problem and her 
students' attitudes are 
terrific." 

In her role as SCA 
advisor, Betty tries to get 
the student body involved 
in the community and 
with people. She also 
works very closely with 
the Woodstock PTA. 
- Educatiou^eemstobea 



! 1 n |.('n 



<• Jl*<*w J 4^ » 



,iM bsMiiiotmA 



r* Ctassroonriiotes 






common bond in her 
family. She met her hus- 
band Gary while he was 
teaching in a Norfolk 
school and she was a 
student teacher. Her twin 
sister, Cathy Peyton, has 
taught at Court House 
Elementary and now 
teaches at Fairfield Ele- 
mentary. Her brother, Al, 
is a band teadier in 
Hampton public schools. 



..^ <ilt.nuui .iwi...^r.^. 



Btyside band parents 
schedule monthly meetings 

The parents and friends involved in the 
encouragement and support of band activities at 
Bayside High School will meet on the first 
Tuesday evoiing of each month at 7:30 p.m. in the 
band room at the high school. Parents of band 
membm will find the topics under the discussion 
of great importance to the future of the Bayside 
Marching Marlins Band. 

The 1979-lMO officers elected at the last 
meeting are Jay Smith, president; Betty Smith, 
vice president; Louise and Robert Hoard, 
secretaries; Sylvia Fan-, treasurer; Hugh Eaton, 
student representative; and Band Director, 
Howard Rule. 



Employee supervision course offered 

The Continuing Education prc^am of the 
Virginia Beadi Public Schools has established the 
distributive education course entitled "Effective 
Employee Supo^on." This course is deigned 
for new, ecperienced and future supervisors. 

The courw is divided into three tm-hour 



sections. You may take one section, two, or all 
three. Each section consists of four class sessions 
held on Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. at Princess 
Anne High School. 

Dtites are as follows: Section I - Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 
10 and 17. Section II - Oct. 24 and 31, Nov. 7 and 
14. Section III - Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 12 and 19. 

Registration must be completed in advance. 
Cost is $10 per section. For more information, call 
427-4856. 



Course to cover basic tax laws 

An 18-hour course, "Federal Income 
Taxation," will be presented in September and 
October by the distributive education section of 
the Virginia Beach City Public Schools. The 
course is designed fw those who are interested in 
basic federal tax laws and will be conducted in six 
evenings of instruction. Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24 
and 31 . at Princess Anne High School from 7 to 10 
p.m. 

R^stration fee is $20. Senior citizens will not 
be char^. For more information, call 427-48S6. 



^En^ish 8S a second language' 
di^tfane program b^lns at Beach 



The Adult Learning 
Ceitter of Virginia Beach 
Public Schools has added 
a daytime propam to 
teadi the English language 
to thoM persons who need 
EogU^ as a seomd lang- 
uage. The iHt^ram ta free. 

Titfee b^inning levels 
an offered. Tira cksses 
meet frmn 8:30 a.m. to 12 
netm for stwkntt who 
iffliterstand smne spokoi 
E^Mi. A bcgtamig con- 
vmtficmal ^e tor stu- 
d«iu wiM qieak no Eng- 
IWi is offored from 1 to 






2:30 p.m. 

For more information 
call the Adult Learning 



Cento- at 
499-0832. 



499-3528 or 



-PBBaONTO-PIBION' 

nu'a U*l -Teu aad Tanr 

LOCAL N*w*p*p«r 



EXIVACASH 

It's lo any. . .advotiie the 
things you no longer need in the 
da^flcd ccrfnmns of your 
hcmetown newipaper. In 
practically no time at all, peopk 
in your neighborhood will know 
what ytw have to idl. You'reon 
the road to extra cadi. . . 
somdxidy will read jmur ad and 
buyl 




ElemcBtary icboob 

Wednesday, Sept. 19 

hot dog on bun 

(chili is optional) 

baked beans 

pineapple cup 

oatmeal cookie 

chilled milk 

Thursday, Sept. 20 

fish sandwich on 

on cheese bun 

f rench fries 

w/catsup 

buttered green peas 

chilled milk 

Friday, Sept. 21 

poor boy sandwich 

(bologna & cheese) 

buttered green beans 

diced pears 

potato chips 

chilled milk 

Monday, Sept. 24 

hot ham & cheese 

sandwich 

buttered com 

fruited gelatin 

chilled milk 

Tuesday, Sept. 25 

sliced turkey 

w/gravy 

mashed potatoes 

buttered carrots 

hot roll/butter 

chilled milk 

Wednesday, Sept. 26 

hamburger on bun 

f rench fries w/catsup 

buttered green peas 

chilled milk 

Thursday, Sept. 27 

fish in batter 

w/cheese wedge 

crispy cole slaw 

sUc^ peaches 

It, ..cdmbrced/buttcr 

chilledmilk 



Friday, Sept 28 . 

sloppy joe on bun 
f rench fries w/catsup 

half apple 

peanut butter crispie 

chilledmilk 

Secondary schools 

Wednesday, Sept. 19 

hot dog on bun 

(chili is optional) 

baked beans 

pineapple cup 

chilledmilk 

ThnrBday, Sqit. 20 

fish sandwich on 

cheese bun 

french fries w/catsup 

buttered green peas 

chilled milk 

Friday, Sept. 21 

beefaroni 

buttered grem beans 

diced pears 

hot roll/butter 

chilled milk 



Monday, Sept. 24 

hot ham & cheese 

sandwich 

buttered corn 

fruited gelatin 

chilled milk 

Tuesday, Sept. 25 

sliced turkey 

w/gravy 

mashed potatoes 

buttered carrots 

hot roll/butter 

chilledmilk 

Wednesday, Sept. 26 

meat loaf w/gravy 
steamed rice 

buttered green peas 

diced pears 

hot roll/butter 

chilledmilk 

Thursday, Sept. 27 

fish in batter 

macaroni & cheese 

crispy cole slaw 

sliced peaches 

cornbread/butter 

chilled milk 

Friday, Sept. 28 

sloppy joe on bun 

french fries w/catsup 

half apple 

chilled milk 



Police department 
to strictly enforce 
bicycle laws 

Beginning immediately, the Virginia Beach Police 
Department will strictly enforce all bicycle laws. This 
crackdown is being instituted to bring about safer 
traffic conditions and compliance with city ordinances. 

All bicycles must be licensed and must meet certain 
safety requirements. Licenses are available at any 
Virginia Beach City Treasurer's Offices, cost $1 and are 
good for the lifetime of the bicycle. . 

Safety equipment includes: brakes adequate to 
produce a skid on dry, level, clean pavement; bicycles 
ridden between sunset and sunrise must have a lamp on 
the front which will emit a white light visible from at 
least 500 feet, a red reflector on the rear which is visible 
at least 300 feet and reflective material on both sides of 
the bike visible from 600 feet in front of Low beam 
headlights of a car. 

Bicyclists are cautioned to: obey all traffic signs, 
signals and lights; ride with at least one hand on the 
handlebars; ride on streets, rather than sidewalks, 
except in residential areas where sidewalks may be used; 
ride only on the pavement seat of the bicycle; stop 
before crossing a sidewalk when riding out of any lance, 
alley, or private driveway; ride on the right hand side of 
a street or highway and when riding with others ride in a 
single file; finally, use hand signals for the last 100 feet 
before turning and while the bicycle is stopped waiting 
to turn. 

Violations of bicycle ordinances can bring a fine of 
$25 for each separate offense. For additional 
information, contact the Virginia Beach Police Crime 
Prevention Office at 427-4146. 



The man or woman who reads 
their community newspaper 
from cover-to-cover each issue is 



Asnrra BUYERS 

not only a well-infonned poson 
on local events, but his or her 
knowledge through this reading 



habit makes them become the 
most astute buyers in this 
comjnunity. 




SHOPPiS 

To Serve You..... 

871 N. MILITARY HWY. 
ACROSS FROM MILITARY CIRCLE 




< 



Nutrition Center 

461-6811 
CERnnra by the international nutrition institute 

Qui^HM to cater to all your muUHIomol ooodo! 




• Scott • PhMpik. 



• Marantz'ThM •OnMga 

WIDE WORLD STEREO 

Ffcfc up Off some good vfbradoiis 
461-7S13 




Colonial Shoe Repair 

C0LU6E NRK SWOPflNfi CENTER 

PMNff 424-7433 

•SST/UbMiBriw 
VaiCWiAKHCII.Va.234M 



Formariy Poliy'a 
BaMity Salon 



HAIR STYLMG 461-4732 

Mon.-Sat. Wods.- Thurs.-Fri. nighte 



4^^^ : 

UNUMIIED 

Of Norfolk, Itw:, 



• answermg macnmes 

CORDLESS telephones 
• HOiNE SECURITY SYSTEMS • PAGERS 
461-1066 



thn your 



^igiiua Beach Sun 



Wtdacstey, SayUwNr », lf79 
S3r«¥av.No.» 

PabHshcd every Wciaoiny by Bycriy PabHcatiMu wlib tkc 
^ efflcc located at IN RMcaMM Kmut, Vtoginia Icaeh, 
V^WIa234S2. 

SUBSCRVnON RATES 



WIUMI IMffWMCr nln 

OMVaw-S7.M 
Two¥tHi-S12.M 



AIIOtlmARM 

OmYcw-».M 

Two Yean -$I9.N 



SacMrf ctaa p o rtag e b fM al L)-wrtHivca Staikm la 
Vto^riaBaeh.Vk|Mn. 



ABCBIP«NIJKI.aillDPDBST«VWXYI 

ALPHABET i 
KOLLE6E • 

DayC«r«CMt«r ■ 

Rogittraiion for Fan Yoar Round Full ' 



I 

J 

K 
ft 



Agoa2thni5yrs. 
Hours 7:M a.111. - S p.m. 

Foffcod Flay Aroa 

Balmifd Maate Pra vfdad 

Raglstratfoa (^aff to Iftt PvMfc 

466 6545 
3164 MACK HOUOW BLVD. 

AacaapONiJiiiMiRDPaRSf Y»«y« 




Mel JACKSON'S 
Accounting Service 

461-4508 

DIVISION OF MKI. J ACKSON'S INCOMKTAX SKRVKI-: 



Body Bout iqui Ixncisi Stumo 



460-4044 

For a IfaM^r, iMfiplar yoif / 
FUN AND FITNESS • EXERCISE TO RMISIC 
CaH For AppoMaMot 



<, 



|QHT«ry 

441-OSlf 



'Mil* 
* EtMk * Mitof m 

For aKyow maalai 
RU NNR i O CLRiiC EVERY 






MM 



^ 



^"^^<ww*i"v^p«np*v<Mp 



.^^^iW^^l^^* 



l«0OTqi09WiWWPi««iPWW 



4 VIRGINIA BEACH SUWD WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBi» H, l»7»t 



Arts and entertamment 



Depression Glass Show and Sale set for Dome 



The Tidewater Depression Glass Club is preparing for 
its 3rd annual Depression Glass Show and Sale. 
Depression glass can best be deflned as mass-produced, 
American-made glassware, which for the most part, had 
no handwork or hand decoration. It was originally 
inexpensive to purchase or was used as premiums. Most 
was made between the period from the late 20^s to 
World War II. 

Generally, it is machine-molded glass produced 
automatically by forcing liquid glass through pipes into 
pressing molds. Much of the glass was molded with 
decorations in relief, derived from a pattern etched or 
cut into the mold. This achieved the effect of acid 
etching, which maii^ the iflass decorative but 



Library of fers new 
magazine index 

The Virginia Beach Public Library's Reference 
Division has just installed "The 

Magazine Index", a new service that will enable 
the public to search quickly an index to all articles 
that have recently appeared in 372 of the most 
popular magazines. The index, located at the 
Bayside Branch Library, enables the user to search 
by subject, author, prodyct name, or other "key 
words". •' 

"The Magazine Index" presently contains an 
index to all the articles, reports, editorials on 
major issues, product evaluations, biographical 

pieties, short stories, poetry, recipes and reviews of 
all types. The file is on microfilm for easy access 
by library users. Each month the file will be 
expanded until it contains five full years of 
information. 

In addition to the index on microfilm the new 
service includes printed lists of the most recent 
articles in the areas of product reviews and current 
events. Entitled "Product Evaluations" and "Hot 
Topics", these printed indexes provide quick 
access to the current subjects of greatest interest. 



Movie program presented 
at Qfffi|.]Heck library 

The Great Neck branch of the Virginia Beach 
Public LilM-ary will present a film program for 
children ages preschool through nine years on 
Saturday, September 29, at 1 1 a.m. 

Movies to be shown afe Dorothy and the Witch, 
The Firehouse Dog, The Lion Has Escaped, and 
The Three Little Pigs. The pro-am will last 40 
minutes. 

The program does not require registration and 
there is no charge. The Great Neck Branch 
Library is located at 1251 Bayne Drive in the 
Hilltop area of Virginia Beach. For further 
information on the program contact C.A. Pauley 
at 481-6094. 



Free blood pressure screening 
sponsored by Bayside Hospital 

Bayside Hospital will sponsore a free Blood 
Pressure Screening Clinic, Thursday, September 
27, from 11 a.m. • 3 p.m. in the hospital lobby, 
800 Independence Blvd., Virginia Beach. 



Monthly series of book talk^ 
sponsored by library 



The I970's might very 
well be called the Blooms- 
bury Decade because of 
the many books published 
in the past ten years on 
^this British literary and 
artistic group. Beginning 



Renaissance 
program for 
the family set 

The Virginia Beach Re- 
creation Center and the 
Virginia Chapter of 
Young Audiences will pre- 
sent the Locrian Consort, 
September 25 at 7:30 
p.m., in the rwreation 
center's theatre, 420 Mon- 
mouth Lane. Bring every- 
one for an evening of 
Renaissance music, as it 
was heard by ladies, lords 
and peasants over three 
hundred years ago. 



inexpensive. 

This rare and beautiful glass will be arranged in an 
unbelievable "Rainbow of Colors" to be displayed by 
dealers from at Irast ten different sutes. 

The Depression Glass Show and Sale will be held at 
the Virginia Botch Civic Center on Friday, September 
28, 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 29. 10 a.m. to 
6 p.m. 

The Tidewater Depression Glass Club was organized 
three years ago by a rapidly growing group of collectors 
from Eastern Virginia for the purpose of broadening the 
knowledge and stimulating interest in the preservation 
of Depression era glass. - 



Infant care program begins 

If you are an expectant parent or if you are planning 
to become one, then you will be interested in a program 
entitled "Baby Briefs" sponsored by the Virginia Beach 
Department of Agriculture/Home Economist Division. 
The three day program will be held on September 25, 
October 2 and Oct. 9. A local obstetrician and other 
professionals will address prenatal and baby care. 

These free programs will be given at the Oceana 
Volunteer Fire Station, 1201 Bayne Drive in the Hilltop 
area, from 10 a.m. - 12 noon and from 7-9 p.m. at the 
Woodstock Volunteer Fire Station, 5656 Providence 
Road. For information on this program or to pre- 
register call the Home Economists Division at 427-451 1 . 

An abbreviated version of this program will be given 
at the Virginia Beach Kempsville Branch Library, 832 
KempsviUe Road, on Thursday, Sept. 27, from 10 a.m. - 
12 noon. For further information contact Bob Halcums 
at 420-2270. 




\ 



A family affair? 



nmtifmyu 



No lest thai fl^e ftunfly groaps are cast BMmbcn of tke SiiakespcaR-by*tlw-4M Conpaay'i apconUog prodactioa 
"The Mcrchaat of Veaice" tpoBsorcd by the Perforadag Arti Halt of the VkiMa leach DcpartaMat of Paika aad 
Recreatioa. The show wiH raa September 20-23, 26-30 at the Virgiala Beach RacifatiMi Ccater Thcatie. Ptetared at 
top teft b Paal Schakr aad Vi wife Jeaaaette; back center, Kathy Stroose, her heilNni CHff Hoffman and their aoa 
Jarrct Pritdmrd; right, acwiyweds Ray aad Sandy Oprea; bottom left, ShM KaykcadaO aad her daaghtcr Aaftia; 
ceater, Omiyn Decker aad her daaghter Rachd. The "Merchaat of Veaice" oiwas on Sept. 20 at 7:30 p.m. Oa 
Tuesday, Sept. 25, at 7:30 p.m. a special concert of Bizabethaa made wOi be prescatcd by the "Locriaa Coasort" ia 
the "Merchaat of Ventec" setting at the theatre. Following the performaace oa Wednesday aad Thursday, Sept. 26 
and 27, the cast aad crew will be avaifaible to aaswer any qnestioas from the andicace, conceraiag the intricacies of 
Shakespearean production. Matinee performances wOl begin at 3 p.m. oa Snaday, Sept. 23 aad 30. The out has also 
been invited to present a commaad performance for the Vin^nia State Thespiaa Society, which will be holdiag its 
aani^t state coaveatioa ia Virginia Beach thb year. After a short rest, the players agala begia rehearsals for their 
annual tour of Vir^nfai Beach high schools and city parks. Reservatioas arc aot reqaired for this year's 
performances, so it to saggestcd that you arrive by 7:15 p.m. to assure a seat. Admlsrioa, as asual, is free. For further 
hif ormation, call 467-4804 or 499-1283. 



Virginia Beach Arts Center adds new staff member 



The Virginia Beach Arts Center has enlarged its staff; 
with the hdp of a salary assistanct grant from the 
Virginia Commission for the Arts and Humanities, th^ 
center now has an assistant to the administrator 
director, Linda H^e. 

Ms. Hale, a New Englander by birth, grew up in 
Washington. DC. She attended schools in Maryland. 
l>'^and New Vcwk-ibefor^ moving WestJto,rEaise a family.: 
Her mother, Mrs. George L. Howe, lives in Scottsville. 

She studied art at Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
the San Francisco Art Institute, and the University of 



Nevada at Reno, from which she also has a master's 
degree in English literature. Her projected dissertation 
wiU be on the inter-relationship of visual and verbal 
imagery in the Pre-Ra{Aiaelites. 

She. iias worked jnith .language and . visual Art& a&_. 
teachers artist; «wii^mini$tfator M- ^he Pinon. GaUeiy ; i. 
in Reno, the Nevada. An (Sidlay, aad the Downtown 
Center of the de Young Museum in San Francisco. 

Her responsibilities will include the studio class^ii 
exhibitions, and public relations. 



FC senior dass conducts 
fund raising paper drive 

The senior class of First Colonial High School 
will hold a ftmd raising ^apa drive on Saturday, 
September 22. All funds will go towards senior 
projecu. Anyone having newspapers to.doimte, 
please bring them to First Orionial's parlcing lot. 
1272 Mill Dam Road, between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. 



ITyoii wisTi t 
please call 




jatypurhonjc. 



\ 



Beach man named to National Challenge Team 



Thursday, September 27, 
at II a.m., the Virginia 
Beach Public Library will 
inaugurate a new monthly 
series of book tallcs with a 

discussion of books about 
Virginia and Leonard 
Woolf, Lyttwi Strachey 
and their circle. 

The program will be 
held at the Oceanfrom 
Branch Library, 1811 Arc- 
tic Avenue, and is free of 
charge. For further in- 
formation contact David 
Palmer at 428-4113. 



MARKET PLACX 

The dassiflel MCtkm of your 
iMmefown n t wip aper is 
csiseiiiiali)' the Inilietin Iwwii aad 
market {Nace of the com^iiiiby. 
Ii locMci ihe inierested cmtoiaer 
■« no other advertitiiit can do. 
This u btOMit the cttAomcn in 
your Hri g Mwrh ood turn to the 
cianiried ptga and March out 
Ike ml^mtk t mt m for ti^iM he or 
A0««MtoNy. 



Bryan Hawley of Vir- 
ginia Beach has been 
named to the National 
Challenge Team, an eight- 
member squad that will 
compete in races in San 
Framdsco, Dallas and two 
additional cities. Hawley 
made the team becaus^ his 
time of 1S:SS.6 was the 
fastest in the country in 
the 40-49 age group who 
competed in the 20-race 
Sprite 5Km Sprint series 
held earlier this summer. 
Hawley raced in Norfolk, 
and is 41-years-old. 



Boys' Club 
prepares for 
flag football 

TTie Boys' Club of Vir- 
ginia Beach is taking flag 
football sign-ups for boys 
ages 7 - 14. The first game 
is SeptembK 29. Must be a 
Boys' Club member. Call 
the club for more infor- 
mation, 499-2311. ' 



-maoN-To-raaaoN- 

Tkal'* ttol 'T«i*a4 TMir 



Hawley is an office 
clerk for Norfolk A Ports- 
mouth Behine Raihroad. 
He won the state title in 
his age group. In all, he 
has coinpeted in 68 races, 
won 48 and came in 
second 13 times. He was 
never involved in sports 
until he took up jogging at 
age 32. 

The National Challenge 



Team wiQ compete in the 
Sprite National Chaltenge 
Race Series against open 
fields of runners from 
each area. The races wiM 
be limited to 2,000 partici- 
pants with runners of 
every age and ability in- 
vited to turn out. 

The National Ambassa- 
dor for the series is Glom 
Cunningham, the legen- 



dary miler of the 1930's. 
Representing Cunning- 
ham at the races wUl be 
former world indoor mile 
record-holder Dick 
Buerkle. 



J' 




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VIRGINIA BEACH SUNDWEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER If . 1»79 5 



K 



Social Security crunch studiett 



By JUDITH G. 
RHOADES 



Q. /am really concern- 
ed whether there wUI be 
adequate Social Security 
money for me what I 
retire. Is there anything 
else I can do? — L.G. 

A. You are not the only 
person asking this ques- 
tion. A survey by Louis 
Harris and Associates last 
August showed that 90 
percent of active Ameri- 
can employees fear that 
Social Security wiU be 
unable to continue paying 
full benefits. One-third of 
those surveyed wmlld oftt 
to get out of the system if 
given any opportunity. 
Meanwhile, the indivi- 
dual's annual contribution 
to Social Security has risen 
dramatically. The maxi- 
mum Social Securky tax 
paid is now Si. 403. 77 per 
year, 31 percent more than 
in 1978 and 230 percent 
more than in 1971. Self- 
employed individuals pay 
up to $1,854.90 annudty. 
And the Social Security 
payroll tax at all income 
levels is scheduled to rise 
further through 1981 to 
keep th6 system in the 
black. 

At the same time, our 
rapidly expanding older 
population will increasing- 
ly test Social Security in 
the years ahead. 

In 1935 thoe were nine 
workers contributing for 
every person over age 65 



You 

and your 

money 




drawing benefits, aocwd- 
ing to the Socid Security 
Adminit^ation. By 1977 
the ratio had fallen to 
4-to-l, and by 1^5 the 
ratio wiD be well below 
3-to-l. At presmt it takes 
five workers contribution 
to Social Security to pro- 
vkle for one retired per- 
son. 

While economists and 
government leaders 
wreAle i^th various solu- 
tions to the Social Security 
crundi, you will need 165 
percent nwre income 20 
years from noW^o main- 
tain your present standard 
of living, abnost three 
times what you now live 
on. Hie Mdrill Lynch 
Retirement Planning De- 
partment suggests that 
some form of portfolio be 
planned. Obviously if you 
are five to 10 years from 
retirement, you have a 
different perspective than 
a person who is just 
beginning his or her work- 
ing careN'. 

The list of questions'^ 
following, answered care- 
fuUy, and perhaps with 
the help of a professiomd 
financial planner may be 



of some help to you: 

1) Where will I retire? 
Relocation costs money, 
but staying in your home- 
town may mean more 
desire to travel. 

2) How much will I 
iwed? Don't assume that 
your cost of living wiU 
necessarily be greatly re- 
duced after retirement. 

3} How can I achieve 
that income with the 
greatest safety? 

4) Should I be afraid to 
risk new investments? 
Should I shift cash flow, 
reduce life insurance? 

5) How can I get the 
best tax savings and bene- 
fits for my heirs? 

6) Do I just want to 
make ends meet or live 
pretty much as I do now 
with most of the friUs of a 
good life? 

7) How many years 
should I plan on enjoying 
retirement? It's wise to 
plan expenses for at least 
20 years. 

Several investments are 
suggested: tax deferred 
annuities, for one. Com- 
mon stocks, if chosen 
well, should provide a 



rettum of about double the 
ate of inflation throng 
the year 2000. It is possi- 
ble to buy stocks on the 
installment plan and 
through mutual funds. 
Munidpal bonds could be 
a posdble investment if 
you are in a high enough 
tax bracket. Of course, 
you should always consid- 
et an IRA if you are not 
self-onployed and have no 
retirement benefits, or a 
KEOGH, if you are self- 
employed. Other options 
include Treasury bills, 
notes and \xmds, and 
money market funds. 

Wldle the govomment 
copes with ways to meet 
the rising demands on 
Social Security, you would 
be wise to map out a social 
security system of your 
own. Remember that ior 
vestments are not a do-it- 
yourself activity, and you 
should obtain the assist- 
ance of a competent fi- 
nancial adviser. 

Jodith Rhoadci it a 
fiee-famce writer who has 
spent IS yean In tlM 
sccbiMm iadastry. If yoa 
have any qmiIIobs regard- 
ing aecnrltlcs, flaaacc or 
die itod( mariwt yon may 
addrcM than to bo* in care 
of this newspaper. Please 
be certain to aldose a 
sclf-addrcsscd, stamped 
avdope if yon wish • 
persoMi reply. Allow a 
minimum of six wcdu to 
receive an answer. 



Consumer interests 



Automation in the marisetplace — it's here to stay 



ByGLENH.MrrCHElX 

CMMHta IpmWM, Cmmht EAkMIm 

vinM«T«c>c«am»fH— fttMiiti 

Computer technology 
has become a part of 
everyday life. Computer- 
assisted check-out coun- 
ters at the supermarket, 
24-hour banking mach- 
ines, and point-of-sale 
computer terminals that 
ring up sales and verify 
credit information in- 
stantly-all signs that the 
computer age is here to 
stay. 

Some grocery stores al- 
ready have computer-assi- 
sted check-out. Here's 
how it works: Each can- 
ned and packaged pro- 



duct, from paper towels to 
milk, has a Universal Pro- 
duct Code, a symbol made 
up of closdy spaced lines 
and bars. When the 
cashier runs the item 
across a scanner, the com- 
puter looks up the price of 
the item and flashes it on a 
viewer so you can see it. 

What's good about the 
system? 

-It reduces errors, and 
speeds up the check out 
line. 

-It gives you a detailed, 
itemized printed tape of 
what you bought. 

-And it makes check 
cashing quicker, since the 



computer can verify credit 
information instantly. 

Any drawbacks? 

-Some shoppers have 
been short-changed when 
the store failed to record 
"Specials" with the com- 
puter. 

-And, some grocery 
firms planned to eliminate 
individual pricing and 
post the prices only on the 
shelves. Consumers felt 
this could make price 
checking virtually imposs- 
ible. So, already at least 
six states and 18 cities 
have passed laws requiring 
individual item pricing. 

Banks, too, have been 
using electronic funds 



transfer to let you pay 
bills and to speed up 
transactions. Computers 
permit customers to make 
deposits, withdraw cash, 
and transfer money bet- 
ween accounts 24 hours a 
day. The new technology 
also lets you deposit your 
paycheck directly to your 
account, electronically. 
This eliminates the danger 
of lost or stolen checks. 
And, you can make a 
deposit even when you're 
sick or away on vacation. 
With ease of withdrawal, 
some consumers may find 
themselves out of money 
before they expect it, 
however. 



Slate floor has lost its shine 



Buying a ifloped ~ what consumers need to know 



xaore than 



What can travel 100 miles or more on a smgle gallon 
of gas? What uses an engine smalla than the average 
lawn mower's to go 25 to 30 miles per hour? The answer 
is the moped, the motorrassisted bicycle that is fast 
bqpoming a popular f(^ ot^ 



It is expected tha^ by tbe &U o: 
900,000 mopeds will be moving on America's streets. 
The rising and understandable popularity of these 
vehicles, says the Better Business Bureau, is creating 
some confusion for moped purchasers and riders and 
drivers of other vdiides. 

Although mopeds have been popuhtf in Europe since 
the end of World War II, it was only in this decade that 
manufactures began to sell vdiides m la^ numbers in 
the U.S. This increase in sales was brought about in 
1974 by a decinon of the National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration dassifying mopeds s^Nurately 
from motorcycles. The ruUng eased safety requirements 
and made it economically feasible to market mopeds m 
this country. 

BnyadMcltHat 

Mopeds still must conform to a set of fedoal 
standards. Prospective buyers should look carefully to 
make sure the machine they are considering bears a 
certification label permanently attached to the frame 
near the handlebars. Hus label should hidude: the name 
of the manufacturer and the month and year of 
manufacture; the gross vdiicle weight rating (OVWR); 
the gross axle wei^t ratmg fen- flront and rear axles 
(GAWR); a vehicle identification number; the type 
classification; and the > required statement of 
conformance to federal standards. Mopeds bearing this 
label are to bb equin)ed with the required safety 
equipment: lamps and reflectora, drum brakes; tures; 
and controls. 

Moped purchasers may want to keep m mind a short 
checklist of otha things to look for: 

- Rear braking action: While mopetb have b(^ front- 
and back-braking action sepantdy controlled on the 
handlebars, riders primarily will want to rely on the rear 
brake because a rear whed skid is easia to control. 
Purchasers should be sure that the machines they test 
ride have strong rear-end stopping powo- and brake 



levers that can be controlled easily, with modest 
pressure. 

- Acceleration: With onlyxwolioBepower motor, at 
most, the moped hardly can be considered a powerful 
^vehidc Nevcrthdess^ tte abiU^ to>BO0ela>ate wdl fro«i'> 
a stop, espedilly In'efty traflfcrcAn^belmpc^rtaiit if dw 
moped is to mix with other traffic. Again, a test ride by 
the moped buyer should provide a "feel" for how well" 
the vehicle takes off from a stop. The rider's wdght and 
the grade of the can be factors, and the purchaser 
should be sure to test the vehicle on an incline. 

- Handling and comfort: Mopeds also should be 
tested at full speed. Since their spMd is so slow they will 
often be driven "wide open." Control, balance, even 
the seat, should be comfortable to the rider, with easy 
and sure maneuverability around road hazards such as 
potholes. 

Defensive driving 

Moped buyers may want to consider purchasing a 
turn-signal kit (about S50) to use instead of hand 
signals. Battery-run turn signals will enable the rider to 
keep both hands concentrated on controlling the 
moped, and the light signals are more visible than hand 
signals, especially at night. A good, loud horn is another 
critical piece of equipment since moped riders often 
have to resort to defensive driving. Drivers of other 
vehides may not be looking out fpr - or see - moped 
riders, and so it is wise for riders to wear bright colors 
and head protection and to antidpate traffic and road 
conditions. 

Warranties on mopeds vary widdy in length of time 
(from three months to a year) and on what parts are 
covered. Buyers should check with dealers to make sure 
they have suffident parts and repair facilities. Mq;>ed 
prices range from $350 to $800. 

Because of thdr rapid acceptance, most states now 
have laws governing moped use. SpMd restrictions, 
road restrictions, age requirements, licensing, 
insunuioe, and the need for protective wearing apparel, 
particularly helmets, are the main fadors covered by 
these laws. The Better Business Bureau reminds 
constmios to be sure they know the requiraneitts for 
the place they live. 



By GENE GARY 

Q. We have a slate entry 
hall which has worn over 
the years and is in need of 
refmishing to renew its 
blackness and shine. 

A few times we put 
something like a shellac to 
renew the shine, but now 
the white lines between the 
pieces of slate are so 
prominent we hate the 
looks of it. 

We have almost des- 
paired of finding what to 
do for it. Can you help? 
— Shirley H. 

A. Slate is practically 
immune to all common 
chonicals and any of the 
usual cleaners may be 
used. Amonia in water 
may be used when needed, 
.but strong acids and 
strong alkaHes may attack 
the grout. 

I Tnlilrj* fti/iBt Athjir 

floors excess water will 
not harm slate. Sand- 
rubbed slate, which is 
relatively smooth, may be 
scoured when necessary 
with steel wool or an 
abrasive pad. If this does 
not remove the previous 
accumulation of shellac 
and other residue, you will 
need to use a terrazzo-type 
stripper or paint and var- 
nish remover. 

When the slate is 
thoroughly dean, q>ply a 
coat of terrazzo-type floor 
sealer. This should im- 
prove the ai^jearance and 
make maintenance easier, 
llie sealer will also protect 
the grout. 

The floor may then be 
waxed with dther emul- 
sion type or solvent type 
wax. This gives a soft 
natural effect. 

Q. Our 30-year-old Vir- 
ginia Beach house has a 
shake roof which is begin- 
ning to ^ow its age. 
Shakes are splitting and if 
the wind Nows very hard, 
I find pieces strewn over 
the yard. A red tephalt 



Here's 
how 




type roof shows under- 
neath in places. 

When we decide to put 
on a new roof, we would 
like to make it another 
shake roof, but I am 
uncertain just how I 
should go about it. 

Should I remove the old 
shakes completely or 
should I put new shakes 
over the old ones. If the 
latter is tim reaimrrwnd^„ 
method, how is it done? 
^HanyK.B. 

A. B0Cta*;4N}ttr sfaUke 
roof is in bad repair and 
Jias been installed over a 
previous roof, I would 
advise removing the 
shakes. Shakes over 
shakes might add too 
much wdght to your roof. 

If the roof under the 
present shakes is firm, the 
new shakes could be in- 
stalled over it. 

If you have never had 
expoience with this type 
of wo^k, I would recom- 
mend getting the advice 
and help of an expert 
roofer. 

Q. Late last fall at my 
lake cottage, using a 
r&idy-mixed concrete, I 
laid a 12xl9-foot concrete 
slab on which now stands 
a small guest house. 

The slab is four inches 



thick and six inches a- 
round the perimeter. 
Coarse gravel and sand 
were us^ as a base for the 
concrete. I did not use any 
vapor-proof or plastic 
sheets prior to pouring the 
concrete. 

My problem is that the 
slab does nOfseem to dry 
and is constantly damp. 
Using a dehumidifier and 
fans has had nojffect. 

Am I destined to always 
have a wet floor or can I 
' ndw do something to dry 
it out permanently? — 
R.L.R., Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

A. Concrete is porous 
and moisture can come up 
through the floor, if, as in 
your case, no moisture 
barrier was installed. But 
tho'e are some remedial 
measures you can try. 

First check the drainage 
to make certain the 
ground next to the slab 
slopes away from the 
foundation, allowing 
water to drain off. 

Then apply a sealer on 
the concrete surface, a 
sealer often used in base- 
ments to keep moisture 
out. There are several 
kinds of sealer on the 
market — Epox-Seal put 
out by Magicolor Co. of 
Chicago, Devcon Bpoxy 



Sealer marketed by Dev- 
con Corp. of Danvers, 
Mass., and others. 

If you cover the floor 
with tile, use only the type 
for ongrade floors, such 
as asphalt tile, vinyl asbes- 
tos or vinyl with moisture- 
proof carpeting also 
makes a very good cover- 
ing for on- or below-grade 
floors. 

Qnestions on boUding, 
home maintenance and 
repair may be seat to 
Here'sHow In care of this 
newspaper. 



Crash course 
In weatherproofiiig 
offered 



The Oceanfront Branch 
Library of the Virginia 
Beach Public Library, in 
cooperation with the Vir- 
ginia Beach Extension Ser- 
vice, Home Economics 
Division, will sponsor a 
program on energy saving 
on September 28 from 10 
a.m. to 12 noon. 

This program is the first 
in a series of programs 
presented by the Virginia 
Beach Extension Service 
and will inform the public 
on the various methods of 
weatherproofing homes 
for the coming winter 
months. 

Hie Oceanfront Branch 
Library is located at 1811 
Arctic Avenue. For more 
mformation contact Ms. 
Rosemary Houseknight at 
428-4113. 



Ridesharing 
forum scheduled 

Employers, employees, 
community groups and 
private individuals are aU 
urged to attend and bring 
a luod) or purchase one at 
the cafeteria. A "Free 
Rider" ticket wiU be avafl- 
able,for each participant. 
For furtho- informa^n, 
call Kathy ttevieds A 461- 
3200. 



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DONE ON PREMISES 



Rinvhart Brothers 

461-1261 

Suite 319 

Janaf Office Building 

Norfolk. VA 23502 



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Let us handle your 
second mortgage . . . 

We'll make you feel 

right at home. 

A second mortgage is a great way to get money fast— when 
it s handled correctly. 

The people at Instaloan Financial Services understand this, 
so we all work hard to provide the helpful, informative kind 
of service that really makes a difference You'll know it the 
minute you stop by or give us a call. When it s time for your 
second mortgage, we can make you feel right at home 

/MSTMLOAM 

LtNIMII 

Financial Services, inc. 

VIRGINIA BEACH OFFICE 
John Sargeni, Jr. 3627 Virginia Beach Blvd 

Branch Manager 



CaNNmv. 

Name 

Address.— 
Rione_^- 



Virginia Beach, VA 234S2 
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VIRGINIA BEACH SDND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER », 1J79 



MigiiiiaBeach^ 



Commentary 



Proclamation 

WHEREAS, the Constitution of the United 
States of America gives us the foundation for a 
free, prosperous, and independent life for every 
citizen, but each generation, in time, must work 
for and claim it; otiierwise, through carelessness 
or indifference, the righu and liberties we have 
enjoyed may vanish; and 

WHEREAS, it is of the greatest consequence 
that the citizens fully underetand the provisions 
and principals contained in the Constitution of the 
United States of America in order to be able to 
support it property as, "The greatest document 
for human liberty in two thousand years of 
recorded history; ' ' and 

'}., ■ 

WHEREAS, the people of the United States 
should be deeply grateful to their Founding 
Fathers for the wisdom and foresight they 
displayed in writing and adopting the 
Constitution. 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Patrick L. Standing, 
Mayor of the City of Virginia Beach, do hereby 
proclaim the week of September 17 through 23, 
1979, as 

CONSTITUTION WEEK 

in Virginia Beach, and ask our citizens to be 
thankful for such freedom and liberty, unknown 
to any other country, and to celebrate our 
independence with appropriate ceremonies and 
activities during Constitution Week as designated 
by proclamation of the President of the United 
States in accordance with Public Law No. 915. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set 
my hand and caused the Seal of the City to be 
affixed this 27th day of August, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventy nine 
and the independence of the United States of 
America, the two hundred and third. 

Patrick L. Standing 
Mayor 



MOBI LE HOME 

from page 1 



Under the present ordinance, exemptions can be 
approved administratively, but when the adjoining 
property owner objects the applicant can appeal to 
council. 

Councilwoman Barbara Henley said that for the first 
three years, the ordinance seemed to have worked, but 
during the last 17 months people have been coming to 
council with more frequency. She said that if the 
adjoining property owner objects, the matter goes to 
council, which creates a difficult situation for members. 
The original ordinance provides for mobile homes in 
mobile parks, but change have been made to fit specific 
cases. The Inspection £>epartment has be6n receiving 
one or two requests a week , Hanbury said . 

"In Currituck County (N.C.) you can see examples of 
unplanned mobile home parks," Hanbury said. "It will 
create problems if exemptions are continued." 

Locating the homes in mobile home parks would 
allow the city to provide the amenities needed for high 
density living, he said, and recommended the repeal of 
two sections which create the exemptions. Mobile 
homes which exist under these exemptions would be 
grandfathered, that is, permitted to remain. 

Although the conditional use permits for mobile 
homes are in agricultural areas, Hanbury said that in the 
future there will be more people in those areas who 
might find mobile homes objectionable. 

Hanbury was directed to bring back his proposal for 
repealing the exemptions. 

The last modification to the law was made last year to 
permit farmers to provide mobile homes for farm 
workers. 

Of the Adams petition, McCoy said that if the Adams 
mobile home is not removed in two years, the city will 
end up with a human problem, that of forcing the 
removal of the home. "We're better off not to start 
something." 

Riganto had originally agre^i to permitting the 
mobile home for a year, but Mrs. Adams wanted an 
indeffnite period because of the uncertainty about when 
a house could be built. She agreed to the two year 
limitation Monday. 



Vliginja Beach Son 



USPSM«-14a 

HancsBycrly 



DooaM R. Frye 

GcMcnu 1 



PanVaadevfor 

EMor 



Mane Braagaa 

ProdvctlMl 



SoBdraCreef VkkicNcH 




Certificate of appreciation 



Captain Dwigkt M. Agnew Jr., Commanding Officer, and Chaplain WiOUun E. Dodson present a ccrtincate of 
appreciation to Mn. Nancy Davis for her dedicated service as Ckalrman of Volunteers to the American Red Cross 
BkNtdBobilc and the U.S. Navy Regional Center, Portsmonth, Bloodmoblle, held at Fleet ComlNit Training Center, 
Atfawtk, Dam Neck, Virginia Beach, during the past two years. 

One year certificate offered in 

air conditioning and refrigeration servicing 



By RICHARD E. HOEHLEIN 

The problem of energy efficiency has become 
important to all of us. Finding ways to get the most 
from heating and air conditioning systems is not just a 
hobby; controlling energy costs is now a way of life. 
With continued emphasis on energy and solutions to 

jenerc problems, cy ^ fieids whic h deal with enffgy_ 
are expanding. 

In Virgiaiai ^ri^ expansion of business. Industry 
and Hourisgtis cmMsibutftog to the phenomenal growth 
in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry. The 

Remand for qualified servicemen in the field is 
increasing rapidly. 



The Virginia Beach campus of Tidewater Community 
College offers a one-year certificate program in Air 
Conditioning and Refrigeration Servicing which 
qualifies graduates for employment in this rapidly 
growing and important field. Graduates of the program 
are capable of installing and repairing air conditioning, 
heating, and refrigeration equipment. 

The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Servicing 
curriculum is designed to train persons who will be 
immediately employable and productive upon 
complttion of the program. The program also offers an 
opportunity for those already employed in the field to 
upgrade and increase their knowledge and skills. 

The instruction program includes both the technical 
knowledge and practical experience necessary for 
success in the industry. Courses in the humanities are 
included to assist the student in social and businns 
communications. Approximately two-thirds of the 
curriculum consists of courses in air conditioning and 
refrigeration, with the remaining courses in related 
technical subjects, general education, and an elective. 

Students have three options for attending classes in 
the Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Servicing 
curriculum. Classes are available in a full-time daytime 
schedule, part-time during the day, or part-time during 
the evenings. 

Career possibilities in the field of Air Conditioning 
and RefrigCTation Servicing are excellent. Graduates 
may find work immediately as Air Conditioning Service 
Technicians, Refrigeration Service Technicians, 
Controls Service Technicians, or Air Conditioning and 
Refrigeration Sales Representatives. These sales and 
SCTVice representatives may find employment in a 
variety of fields. The construction industry employs 
many servicemen, primarily in the installation of new 
equipment. Many serviconen are employed in the 
wh(^sale trade, working for independent whol^alers, 
factOTy branches, and manufacturers' representatives. 
Service shops which specialize in repairs and 
maintenance employ about 17 percent of all servicemen. 
Some graduates of the TCC program have gone into 
business for themselves, setting up service shops. 

The flexibility of the field and the ability of a 
mechanic and repairman to enter several areas of 
industry attract many students to the program. 

While we use the terms repairman and serviceman for 
the sake of convenience, the field is not limited to men. 
Like most technical fields, air conditioning and 
refiriferatton servicing has been predominantly a male 
careo-. However, as «U'ly as 1970 there were more than 
1,000 women service "men" in the United Stats. The 
TCC program has graduated several women students, 
and women are welcome. 

Students interested in Air Conditioning and 
Refrigeration Servidi^ curriculum are required to take 
mechanical aptitude t^s which are administo-ed by the 




Today 
college 
counts 



counseling office. 

In conjunction with the instructional program, the 
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Servicing faculty 
holds state-sponsored energy clinics for community 
groups, prnenting tips on how to improve home and 
business energy efficiency. 

For further information on the Air Conditioning and 
Refrigovtion Servicing curriculiun, or to arrange an 
energy clinic for your organization, contact the 
Industrial and Public Service Technologies Division at 
the Virginia Beach campus, 427-3070. 
Today college counts! 



The forecast says 

cold ahead, so let 

us fuel Uie fires of your 

home lmt^o¥ement plans. 

WkOmiat your hMw now befora 
thoae ooid wMs How. 'Yroit Wwning" 
brings you aN tho I^Ht biformathMi 
on Ml lawn MTo, landacapkig and 
nomo bnprovomont Mwa. 

Tho weatherman predi^ cold weather 
ahead. Be reatfy for II by reading 
"Prostl W e r w ii H i " now. 

Wnloii for K eonwif noon hi 



FfiOSrWlSNINQ/ 




number's 
up ^ 




Household workers and social security 

By HARVEY RIDINGER 



In most jobs. Social Security taxes are automatically 
deducted from an employee's paycheck. But this isn't 
always the case with household workers. 

Household workers are people onployod in or around 
someone else's home ~ for example, babysitters, maids, 
cooks, laundry workers, butlers, gardeners, chauffeurs, 
and people who do housecleaning or repair work. 

Eamlngi of a houckoM worker who is imld $50 or 
nHwe by any one cmptoyer in a 3-aionth calendar 
qnarter at* covMtd by the Sodal Security law. 

If you are a household worker, you should show your 
employer your Social Security card and tell her or him 
to deduct Social Security taxes from your wages. If yon 
dofi't yon won't ^ Sodal Security credit for your 
work. And you need credit for a certain amount of work 
in order to get Social Security benefits. 

If you work long enough under Social Security, bot^ 
you and your dependoits cm get monthly cash benefits 
when you retire or if you become disabled. 

You will have Medicare protection at 6S, or earlier if 
you become (Usabled and get disability checks for two 
years. And your famOy can get monthly survivors 
payments if you should die. 

If you employ a household worker, it's your job to 
see that the Social Security taxes are paid and the 
worker's wagn are properly reported. 

For each calendar quarter that you pay your 
employee cash wages of $30 or more, you must d^luct 
Social Security taxes from all of the employee's wages. 
In 1979, the tax is 6.13 percent of the cash wages. You 
pay an equal amount as the employer. 

Within one month after the aid of a calendar quarter, 
you must send the taxes to the Internal Revenue Service 
with a report of total wages paid. The report should be 
made on IRS Form 942 (Employer's Quarterly Tax 
Return for Household Employees), which is available at 
any IRS office. 

At the end of the year, you must complete IRS Form 
W-2 (Wage and Tax Statement). Give copies B and C of 
the W-2 to your housdiold employee no later than 
January 31. 

Send copy A, along with Form W-3 (Transmittal of 
Income Tax Statements) to the Social Security 
AdmrhiMfatron by February 28. You can get the SSA 
ir area from IRS Circular E (Employer's 
'^"^^•kSiSalSecurity office. -' 



mwM^IM'mmm coveted by the Sddtt 
SccnrUy hiw. Hoaaehold work pcrfom«l by a child 
under 21 for a |HU«nt, by a hnsbaad for his wife, or by a 
wife for her kusband is not covered even though wages 
may be paid. 

For more information about Social Security coverage 
of household workers, ask for a copy of the leaflet 
"Social Security and Your Household Employee" at 
any Sodal Security office. 

The Norfolk office is located in the Federal Building. 
Room 600, 200 Oranby Mall. The phone number is 441- 
3401 . Office hours are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 





SUN DeadUnes 

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VaCiMA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, iy79 7 



I 



Notes from the 



shelter industry ^ 





each real estate 



Maintenance a must for 

septk tanks and smoke detectors 



By UN J. COOPER 



We're coining at last to the end of the pessary on 
home maintenance idou and sugfeitioiu. lliis week's 
column deals with roofs, septic tanks uid smoke 
(tetectors. 

Your roof will ^ve ^u many good years of service if 
it is propo^ly maintained. Flashing seal {daces where the 
roof abuts walls, chimneys, dormers or vallors where 
two roof slopes meet. If a leak should occur, caU a 
qualified roofer to make the repair; if it is rq»ired as 
soon as the roofing material has dried, the cost will be 
far less than if the job is postponed. 

A qualified roofer diould inspect your roof at least 
(Bvery three years. If you have to walk on your roof for 
any reason be careful not to damagt the surfKe or the 
flashings. Be particuUrly careful when lostallbig a TV 
or radio aerial; a careless job can cause serious leaks. 

Fiteic-thaw cydcs. Winter storms qwUed briefly by 
relatively mUd temperatures can cause freeze-thaw 
cycles which sometimes result in leaking roofs. 

Most roof shingling is not waterproof. Shingles are 
meant to shed water down thdr overlapi^ courses 
into gutters or off the roof overhand. When erratic 
weather conations cause a buildup of water-^ther 
from snow or ice dams formed on the roof or in the 
gutters and downspouts-that standing water may back 
up under the shingles or eventually seep throt^ the 
phingles, causingleaks. 

Although roofs with a shaUow pitch are more 
susceptible to this phenomenon than are steqrfy pitched 
roofs, no conventional honw is completely unmune 
from the problem. Check gutters and downspouts to 
remove ice blockage and attonpt to remove buflt-up ice 
and snow on the lower porti<Mis of the roof. 

Septic taalu. With proper care and attention sq>tic 
tanks will serve as satisfactorily as dty ' sewers. 
Otherwise they can become a burdensome expense, and 
whoi functioning improperly, a nd^borhood health 
menance. All septic tank installations must meet local 
health standards. 

Learn theloeation^ the s^ic tank and tts draimwe 
field. For best results, inspect them annually. The 
frequenqr with which a mQc'timK IQuMdfllk'cI'eiQutf ' 

of people it serves. 

the tank is large enough to accommodate 
additional wastes, the use of a h<Hisehohl disposal will 
require more frequent deanfaig. When the total depth of 
scum and solids exceetb one-third the liquid d^th of 
the tank, the solids diouid be removed. ¥nth ordhiary 
use and care, the tank will i^obably need deanhig every 
two years. Your local health dqnrtment may help you 
locate someone to perform this service. . 

Because warm weather hastens bacterial action, septic 
tanks should be cleaned in the s{»ing. The waste 
material gives off obnoxious odors and may contain 
dangerous disease bacteria. Therefore, H should be 
disposed of in a manner $ppro^ftd by your local health 
department. 

No chemicals are capable of redwang woMt in a septic 
tank to the point where deanfaig is unnccestary and 
patented cleaning agents generaOy should not be added 
to the sewage. 

Smoke dctedora. If your new home is equij^wd with 
a smoke detector, cotam Insic procedures will oisure 
its proper fimction in an onergency. Carefully review 
the manufacturer's literature to fanUUarin yowsdf 
with the unit. Smoke detectors are dther battery 
operated or competed to the home's dectrkal system. 
Most battery operated detectors have a method of 
warning the homeowno' when the hMtry is low in 
power. This may be a warning li^t or a gentle nam. 
Some smoke detectors wiU condnw to soimd untU a 
reset button is pushed. Other types will stop 
automatically when smoke is deared frwn the diamber. 
Check the manufacturer's literature to see wl^i type 
you have so that you may ux accwdingly if tlw detector 
is acddentally trigged. Periodically test the detector to 
see if it is wwking properly. 

Note the manufacturer's recommendations for 
pOTodic maintenance. Sudi mamtenuice n»y faidude 
repiadng the light bulbs, repladng the batteries, 
vacuuming the unit inside and out and deai^ with a 
cotton swab ami alcohol. Different types of Sectors 
wiir require diffowt care and the literature that came 
with your detectornriU give qiedfic detafls. 



' Apartment modes 



Ways to break up the monotony 



Br^t and cheery, thb dark Utchcn is lighted and given plenty of sparkle with light 
badtground wallpaper, crystal and Indtc as well as stainless steel appUances and 
coontcrtoiM. Shiny materials hdp add light to the room through thdr reflective 
qualities. 



By LESLIE AYERS 

One of the biggest prob- 
Inns of living in a one- 
room apartment is having 
to look at the same four 
walls day after day. 

There are several ways 
to break up the niono- 
tony. Some require con- 
struction while others are 
just a matter of proper 
arrangement of your fur- 
nishings. 

A change in floor levels 
will make a considerable 
difference in tlw appear- 
ance of one large room. 
Define the area you wish 
to devate and build a 
platform. The platform 
need only be four to six 
inches higher than the rest 
of the floor. Cover the 
platform area to match or 
coordinate with the rest of 
your floor. 

If you have tall ceilings, 
you can build a small loft 
sleeping area. In this way 
you have taken advantage 



of the unused space. But 
these construction items 
cost money and may not 
be something your land- 
lord would appreciate. 

Screens, generally, are 
one of the b^t accent and 
space dividers. 

For a contemporary 
look, use a curbed com- 
merdal-style screen such 
as those found in modern 
offices. The curve also will 
break up the squareness of 
the room. 

The metal slat blinds, 
woven woods and match- 
stick shades can be effec- 
tive and colorful dividers. 
Mount these in the ceUing 
and pull them up when 
you want the entire space 
opened up. These give 
visual depth to the room 
since it is very appealing to 
be able to see part of one 
area from another area of 
the room. 

The way you arrange 
your furniture and the use 



of lighting will also create . 
interesting dimensions in a 
large, square studio apart- 
ment. Use light to define 
your areas. With proper 
lighting, you can illumi- 
nate the areas as you wish 
them to be seen. 

The way your furniture 
is arranged will have a 
bearing on placement, and 
style of lighting. This 
method of lighting works 
best when you have your 
furniture arranged into 
distinct spaces for sleep- 
ing, sitting and dining. 

Try to define your sit- 
ting area by placing the 
sofa perpendicular to the 
wall. Reinforce this square 
you have started by plac- 
ing chairs close by. Don't 
put everything up against 
the wall. 



Use your furnishings 
creatively to build interest 
and the .feeling of addi- 
tional space. 



Shedding light on subject of dark kitchen 



By BARBARA 
HARTUNG 



Q. We have a very dark 
kitchen with no natural 
light. 

I know the logical thing 
to do b to paint the dark 
cabinets white and like- 
wise have light walls and 
ceiling. rHj^^t, "r»e 

condition and practically 
new that I really lurte to 
chmge them. 

The floor is in need of 
replacement and the walls 
need painting. What 
would you suggest? — 
T.P.M. 

A. A light floor — 
perhaps an off-white peb- 
bly texture or a simulated 
brick — would be a good 
beginning for lightening 
the room. 

Leave the dark cabinets 
if they are new and good 
looking. 

Add light and crispness 
to the walls and ceiling 
with a light wallpaper — 
perhaps an off-white 
background with a (X)lor- 
ful design. 

Add a light for general 
illumination or consider a 
lighted ceiling. Also add 
fluorescent fixtures reces- 
sed beneath the wall-hung 
cabmets to provide plenty 
of light for working. 

Use reflective materials 
whenever possible — 




Decor 



score 



blue, green and yellow 
would be nice for your 
accents, mixing than a 
syou find accessories, in- 
cluding paintings, picture 
frames, lamps and cera- 
mics, that you feel will 
add to your home. 



several colors — often a 
background color such as 
the soft orange and a 
natural beige grass. Look 
for the same soft orange 
Venetian blinds ^d if you 
want to enhance the 
Oriental effect, install a 



pleasant when combined 
with a pair of faux bam- 
boo or wood and cane 
seated chairs. You cpuld 
add blue cushions if the 
chairs demanded them. 

Wood tones of tables 
and small chests in place 



Aaterials thitttfitt'' (Sttch 

»■. — d bw 
about. Stainless steel, 
chrome, clear acrylic, 
shiny enamel and gleam- 
ing crystal will help ac- 
complish that. 

Q. I need help in plan- 
ning a redecorating pro- 
ject for the living and 
dining rooms. These two 
rooms are open to each 
other and are heavily 
traveled since we do not 
have a family room. 

The rooms are paneled 
in a dark walnut. I have 
plain gold draperies with 
white sheers. 

There are two chairs — 
one gold rocker and one 
greats Our recliner is done 
in a green arul blue plaid 
and the couch is green. I 
have a gold pull-up chair 
also. lam seriously think- 
ing of having the gold 
rodxr and the other green 
chair recova-ed. I want to 
stay with the traditional 
styling. 

The carpeting has to be 
rej^aced. Could you sug;^ 



gest a good color for me? I 
wemld like to get away 
from gold if I could but do 
not know what to look 
for. 

Also what colors could I 
use for accents? — J.H. 

A. Why not introduce a 
new color scheme in your 
redecorating project? A 
green, blue and gold com- 
bination which you might 
find in a floral pattern 
would be nice for your 
gold rocker and green 
chau:. A modest floral 
pattern usually will not 
fight with a plaid but 
rather be complementary 
to it. 

For your carpeting you 
might like a sea green. 
Bri^t and dull shades of 



Q. I just bought a most 
beautiful OiiefMl rug in 

light blue and cream. I 
have a very small living 
room in which I want to 
use it and decorate around 
it. 

I'd like a fairly dmn^ 
tic, warm^ad-'iffviitng 
set^ngrf^t^ rug. IHease 
suggest some colors and 
other ideas for highlight- 
ing the room. I have wood 
floors. I'll be buying new 
furruture and draperies. 
-P.P. 

A. Grasscloth in soft 
orange and beige would be 
lovdy on your walls and 
give you the drama you 
probably want to comple- 
ment your rug. Many 
grassdoths today offer 



modest lambrequin at the of end tables would adtTa 

window covered in the richness to the room, 

grass cloth. highlighted with your de- 

A navy and cream corative rug. 
fabric in a small print for 
a small sofa would be 



Please send questions 
Decor Store in care of 
newspaper. 



for 
litis 



TOP SALESMAN 
AUGUST 



JIM COCHRANE C.R.S. 

481-3103 Res. 
420-3120 Offfic* 





Realty, Inc. 



Prot9ct your /jivosfment' Soe one of those leading area Realtors! 

You can trust a Realtor! 




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8 VHK;iNiA BEACH SUNDWEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19. If7» 




Add pleasant pottering to your September schedule 

By PATRICK DENTON a 



Bacterial blight can Icill soybeans 



Sometime this month every backyard or even 
apartment gardener should treat himselLej herself to a 
period of pottering — that unstrenuous bit of dallying 
over one's cherished hobby that relaxes the mind and 
soothes the nerves, satisfying at the same time that 
pleasure that comes with putting things in order. 

The end of a busy summer season is an excellent time 
to spend on those tidying-up jobs, talcing stock of your 
garden supplies and placing all the tools of your trade 
where you want them. 

For the backyard gardener, the first place to start will 
be the garden shed or whatever area you use for garden 
supplies. Surplus fertilizers will need to be stored away 
so they will be in good condition for use next spring. 
Some fertilizers tend to take up moisture if they are kept 
in the damp. These should be placed in plastic bags or 
some airtight container. 

Carefully label your fertilizers. As an added 
precaution place a label inside the package in case the 
outer label disappears. It is not a good idea to dispose of 
leftover bits of fertilizer by sprinkling any combination 
of oddments over the garden just to get rid of thnn. In 
fact, certain chemical combinations could react in the 
soil to result in serious crop problems later. 

Nitrogen fertilizers could be scattered on the compost 
heap to help in the rotting-down process. But read labels 
carefully and watch that no weed killers especially get 
thrown anywhere on the garden. 

Check bottles of liquid fertilizer to be sure that they 
are well closed. Store them to the back of shelves for 
safety. Insecticides and fungicides should be locked 
away if there are children about, especially if they are 
budding chemists. 

All your gardening tools should be gathered together, 
cleaned up and stored. A rub-down with an oiled rag 
will maintain the good condition of both hand tools and 




Backyard 
gardener 



large digging forks and shovels. It's a good idea to have 
a specific place for each tool along the garage or 
toolshed wall, or whatever spot you use. 

Any seed trays, planters or pots not in use should be 
carefully cleaned, dried, stacked and stored. 

The apartment gardener might like to take his 
pottering time to renovate or establish a garden corner, 
with a potting table brightly painted. Wall shelving 
above the table can store tools and other garden 
supplies, interspersed with trailing plants and gardening 
books. A garden comer can thus become a highly 
decorative center of interest in an apartment. 

A rather pleasant sitting-down job is sorting through 
the packets of leftover seeds from the season. We used 
to throw out unused seed, as it just wasn't worth 
keeping it and risking lowered germination rates with 
old seed next spring. 

However, that was several years back when packets of 
seed were to be had for 10 or 15 wnts. Today, of course, 
the price of seed makes it much more worthwhile to seal 
and store seed carefully for use the following year. Store 
seed cool, dark and dry. 

While he is tidying up, the backyard gardener would 
do well to plan for storing his onions and potatoes. Find 
a space in the cellar or garage, if there is no cold room, 
with good ventilation and very cool temperatures. It 
should be dark and dry. Boxes can be raised off the 
ground on bricks if necessary. 



Lawn thatch: a little is good, a lot is bad 



Lawn experts agree 
you've got to keep your 
eyes on your thatch. 
Thatch js the layer of both 
alive and dead grass parts 
thai accumulates between 
the soil surface of your 
lawn and the actual green 
^ass blades. 



A little thatch is good. 
A thin layer, about 14" or 
less, helps insulate grass 
against extreme cold or 
heat - and even helps your 
lawn take the punishment 
of pounding feet^ But if it 
builds up to past 3/4" 
troubles start. Your lawn 
becomes more vulnerable 
to lawn care problems 
because insects and 
disease live in thatch. 
And, any lawn treatments 
you use are far less effec- 
tive if you have too much 
thatch, because thatch 
keeps the fertilizers and 
insect controls from enter- 
ing the soil. Severe thatch 
problems will also cause 
water to run off instead of 
reaching grass plant roots. 
And finally, thatch also 
makes grass much more 
susceptible to heat and 
drought stress. 

You can find out if you 
have a thatch problem by 
cutting out a wedge of turf 
with a knife. If you find 
your thatch is about ■/}" 
thick, you can remove it 
with a "power rake" 
which you can obtain at a 
tool rental center. Thick 
layers (3/4" or more) 
usually require machines 
known as "verti-slicers" 
or "dethatching mach- 
ines" which, again, are 
available at rental centers. 
You should never de- 
thatch Northern lawns 
(cool-season grasses) dur- 
ing the hot summer 
months, although summer 
is the ideal time to de- 
thatch zoysia and Ber- 
muda lawns. For 
Northern grasses, de- 
thatch about six weeks 
before the growing s«uon 
ends in the fall. If you 
don't have the time this 
fall, early spring is the 
second-best time. Most 
grasses require dethatch- 
ing about every third year; 
but some, like zoysia and 
BoiDuda grass, may in- 



quire yearly dethatching. 
Also, if you need to 
overseed your lawn, or 
seed Qiily^Me spots , itX 
^lecessary to remove 
thatch first, because grass 
seed will only germinate if 
it's in contact with the 
soil. Since grass seed ger- 
minates better in the fall 
than in the spring, this is 



one more reason why fall 
is the best time to de- 
thatch. 



Finally, agronomists 
caution ^lf^ ^>^^ W^:.f*r; 
ceuive layer'' of thatch 
forms, it's almost imposs- 
ible to remove it wiUiout 
seriously damaging the 
appearance of your lawn - 



because many grass roots 
will be growing primarily 
in thatch. So, if you 
juspect you have thatch 
problems, talk to a pro- 
f^io^ lawn care ^tpert. 

The time and effort wiU 
assure you^> a greener, 
thicker, and healthier 
lawn in the months ahead. 



Tips for harvesting pumpkins, squash 



R)I-:.P.CIJRUNG.JR. 

Both winter squashes 
and pumpkins should be 
well matured before har- 
vest and storage. Handle 
them carefully; cuts and 
bruises in the rind are 
open to decay organisms 
that may cause a great 
deal of loss from rot in a 
short time. 

Under proper condi- 
tions, wounded areas on 
both squashes and pump- 
kins are capable of healing 
over by producing cork 
tissue, which gives protec- 
tion against the entrance 
of rot organisms, temper- 
ature and in a moist 
atmosphere. 

Good results have been 
obtained by curing pamp- 
kins and squashes at a 
temperature of 80 depces 
F with a relative bnmldlty 
of about 80 to 85 perceal, 



for 10 days after harvest- 
ing. At the end of the 
10-day period the humidi- 
ty should be lowered to 
about 70 percent and the 
temperature kept between 
SO degrees and 60 degrees. 
It is essential that the 
surface be kept dry during 
the storage period. Tem- 
peratures about 60 degrees 
tend to keep the respira- 
tion rate too high, and 

considerable loss in weight 
results. Excenivc loss of 
moisture or solids impairs 
the quality. 

Any dry place where the 
proper temperature can be 
maintained is suitable for 
the storage of squashes 
and pumpkins. They keep 
best when not piled on top 
of each other. A good 
method is to provide 
shelves where they can be 
spread out in a single layer 



with a small space between 
the fruits. Storing them in 
this manner greatly re- 
duces the chances of loss 
from decay. 

Harvesting and 
curing gourds 

The small decorative 
gourds have a somewhat 
thick flesh and require 
special attention when 
harvested. They should be 
picked when fully mature, 
and before frost, to reduce 
the possibility of spoilage 
during or after curing. 

When ripe, the stem will 
turn brown and start to 
shrivel. The rind should be 
hardening but the skin will 
be quite tender. Cut the 
fruits from the vines with 
pruning shears, leaving a 
short section of the stem 

See PUMPKINS, page 9 



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By STEVEN W.COSKY 

Bacterial blight occurs 
worldwide and is the most 
common bacterial disease 
of soybean, especially dur- 
ing cool, wet weather. It 
occurs throughout the 
United States, where 
many cultivars are very 
' susceptible. 

The disease i; most 
conspicuous in fields up to 
midseason. The causal 
bacteria remain active 
until checked 1^ hot, dry 
weather. 

SymptOM Lesions are 
conspicuous on the leaves 
and are frequently found 
on stems, petioles and 
pods. Small angular, 
translucent and water- 
soaked, yellow to light 
brown spots appear on the 
leaves. The cmters soon 
dry out, turn dark, red- 
dish-brown to black, and 
are surrounded by a 
watersoaked margin bor- 
dered by a yellowish-green 
halo. 

Young leaves frequently 
show stunting and chloro- 
sis. The angular lesions 
enlarge in cool, rainy 
weather and merge to 
produce large, irregulaiir * 
dead areas. The centers of 
older lesions frequently 
drop out or tear away 
giving leaves a ragged 
appearance especially 
after strong winds and 
beating rains. Early de- 
foliation of lower leaves 
may occur. 

Pod lesions are at first 
small uid^^^ mitersoaked, 
later they enlarge and 
merge to involve a large 
part of the pod. The 
lesions t nni dw k browii to 
black with age. Seeds be- 
come taifected and may 
eventually be covered with 

a sihny bacterial growth. 

Later, stored seeds may 
show a variety of symp- 
toms including shriveling, 
sunken or raised lesions, 
slight discoloration, or 
appear healthy. Large 
black lesions may develop 
on the stems and petioles. 



Disease Cycle The 
disease may overwinter in 
crop residue and in seed. 
Seeds can be inf^ted 
through the pods during 
the mowing season, or 
become invaded during 
harvesting and infected 
while in storage. Primary 
infections, of cotyledons 
may be a major source of 
inoculum that causes se- 
condary lesions on seed- 
lings. 

Spread of the bacterium 
occurs during windy rain 

storms and cultivating 
while the foliage is wet. 
Bacteria may exist on the 
leaf surfaces and on buds, 
needing only the proper 
temperature and wind- 
blown rain to enter the 
leaf. 

Develt^Huent of bac- 
terial bli^t is favored by 
cool, rainy weather. Out- 
breaks of disease usually 
follow windy rain storms. 

Control 1. Avoid plant- 
ing highly susceptible cult- 
ivars where the disease is a 
potential threat. 

2. Plant disease-free 
seed. 

3. Rotate with nonsus- 
ceptible crops. 

4. Completely cover 



plant residue by clean 5. Do not cultivate 
plowing after harvest, when the foliage is wet. 



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Capture solar energy with a greenhouse 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 19, 197r 



More and more Americans are beginning to toy with 
solar energy in one of its simplist forms - a greenhouse. 
After years of popularity in Great Britain and Canada, 
interest in hobbiest grwnhouses is beginning to take 
root in this cQuntry. 

By and large, greenhouses remained luxuries until 
after the second world war when metaJ fabricating 
techniques developed during these years, as in the 
aircraft industry, opened the door to peacetime mass 
production of greenhouses of strong but light frames of 
aluminum instead of wood. Hobbiests today are able to 
purchase precision, factory-built greenhouses never 
before available to the small scale greenhouse gardener. 

Manufacturers, distributing their products 
nationally, are offering a large variety of freestanding 
and lean-to type greenhouses. In the Tidewater area. 
Continental Greenhouses, LTD has supplied these low 
maintainence units to dozens to private homeowners. 
Builders of custom homes are beginning to feature their 
new models with a greenhouse. 

Do-it-yourselfers are buying their greenhouses 
unassembled and deriving great pleasure frc^ watching 
them go together in a couple of days. 

Greenhouses in their most advanced form are being 
used by many homeowners as glass rooms and as sun 
room extentions. 

Greenhouse kitchens and dining room extensions 




Gardeners: time to get ready for fall 




An example of a fall glass kao-to style greenbonse 
conseKatory. 



This factory made free-standing model can be delivered 
in kit fom or installed by distributor. 

have become popular as have many other "solar" room 
extensions in family rooms, bedrooms and deck 
enclousures. Improved materials, sophisticated 
extrusions and ultra high strength heat-tempered glass 
has made the greenhouse an especially interesting way 
of increasing the usable living area at home. A 
permanent add-on greenhouse conservatory not only 
provides hours of gardening and family pleasure, but at 
the same time, upgrades the property. 

Less serious gardeners are looking to greenhouse 
conservatories not only as a place to grow tomatoes in 
the winter, but as a simple but very effective way of 
adding heat - reducing fuel consumption - during the 
coldest months of the year. 

Although a house loses heat to a greenhouse on the 
coldest nights (keeping the temperature up for the 
plants), there is an overall heat gain by the house during 
the winter. The efficiency of this process is increased 
when double glazing is used and when materials with the 
greatest heat storing capabilities are utilized in the 
greenhouse floor. 

So it looks like lots of people are taking advantage of 
the structurally and aesthetically superior greenhouse 
products available today, not just for gardening but for 
a better way of living. 
How about lunch in your garden this winter! 



B>JiMKEEBH: 

If you haven't noticed, fall weathw is slipping into 
the gardener's activities. My respiratory allergies always 
make me acutely aware of changing fall conditions. 
Goldenrods will be giving allergy sufferers fits soon. 
Established lawns should be kfpt free of leaf 
accumulations to avoid matting. Wet leaves tend to mat 
and often kill grass and some perennials. 

Clean garden sites of debris and weeds. Weeds are 
producing seeds for next season. It's much easier to 
remove weeds before seeds mature and become 
dispersed. This should also eliminate winter harborage 
for rodoits such as rats and mice. Populations of these 
pests should not be at a peak for the year. As the 
abundant food and cover of spring and summer Icisens, 
they will be attempting to invade our homes, garages or 
sheds. I try to maintain several stations of anticoagulant 
baits in corn meal as a greeting for these invaders. Use 
caution to avoid access of \mi% to children and pets. 

Mice are esstentially resident pests and easily 
controlled on one's own property. Rats, on the other 
hand, are more inclined to wander. You usually 
encounter populations moving in from fields or down 
the street. 

A friend interested in native azaelas visited The Great 
Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and 
upon his return related a story told by guides there 
about a park bear that ate a PhD. 

About this point, I am tempted to use the cliche' 
about "it's a small worid." As chance would have it, 
the individual about whom they're referring to was 
Director of Horticulture at Callaway Gardens in Pine 
Mountain, Georgia while I was an employee there. 

As a doctoral candidate in horticulture at Ohio State 

University, he selected native azaelas of the Smokies as 
the topic of his dissertation. This involved living in a 
tent in the wilds of the park for a number of summers. 

Once while on a study away from his tent, he left all 
his accumulated notes and date in a knapsack in the 
tent. Apparently an every-hungry black bear came along 
foraging for food. It's not clear to me whether there 
actually was food in the knapsack or not, but that bear 
though there was. 

It snatched away knapsack, data, and one man's 
dreams of becoming a PhD in horticulture. All that was 



lound of the data was only bits and pieces. He could not 
or would not duplicate the years of data he'd lost. 



Experts agree: fall is the best time to improve your lawn 



All broadleaf week controls are most effective in the 
late fall because air and soil temperatures are much 
more favorable for weed control at that time. TTiat's 
'What the lawn exp«ts say. And Dr. Robert Miller, vice 
president/research and development of ChemLawn, 
one of America's leading lawn care services, agrees. 

Pr- iMM>Hi»iWI k i wHl i wi li that if they don't ■pfiT' 
weed contrds in the faD, weeds in their lawn wOl return 
heavily next siffiQg because just a single weed lan 
produce sevo-al thousand seeds each year. Whether 
from seeds or roots left deep down in the soil, the weeds 
in your lawn will regenerate and esUblish themselves 



V" 



firmly in lawn areas weakened by winter stress long 
before the weather is warm enough to apply spring weed 
conti^ols. 

- ™4loffleown«-s shouldjdso know that fa i l is the nidsr 
important feeding time in your lawn's yearly growth 
(^de.-iVtJur^p^fflmjpWrition t6 help it i^cdVcr from 

"ibgkmmmmmmtSk dh}ugm;#efti^i&Ktf lusi^sr 

Your soU alone cannot furnish all the needed nutrients. 
Fall fertilization snppliesihose ne^ed nutrients so your 
lawn can produce new tillers and rhizomes which will 
grow into new grass plants. Fall fertilization will give 
you a greener lawn well into the winter and help your 



lawn bounce back faster in the spring. 

Dr. MiUer suggests that you make sure that your lawn 
gets a balanced fertili zer treatment th|s fall containiiyL 
|»taMum, wTiTch Tielps^ §^ winter stressT 

phosphorus, which promotes strong grass root growth, 
^d nitrogen, to wake up your lawn next spring afnd give 
It a rich, greener color. ' '" 

So, while most homeowners are thinking about things 
like football, back-to-school, and the holidays ahead, a 
little time spent in late fall working on your lawn can 
pay off next spring in a lawn that has fe#er weeds, looks 
greener and is a lot healthier. 



Virginia Beach's own newspaper 

Pick up a copy 
of the SUN 

Get extra copies of the Virginia 

Beach SUN at the following list 

of newsstands located throughout 

the Virginia Beach area: 

NORTHHAMPTON BLVD. AREA 

Norfolk Airport 

Lake Wright Motel 

Holiday Inn 

SHORE DRIVE AREA 

Big Star (Baysiiie Shop. Ctr.) 

IMcCoy Pharmacy 

Seashore State Park 

Farm Fresh (Great Neck Square) 

HILLTOP AREA 

General Hosp. of Va. Beach 

Peoples (Hilltop Shop. Ctr.) 

Food Fair (Hilltop Shop. Ctr.) 



OCEAN FRONT AREA 

Peoples (Laskin Rd.) 

Big Star (LaskinRd.) 

7-11 (32 nd St.) 

Fireside News (Pacific Ave. ) 

Mariner Motel (Atlantic A 57th) 

HolMay Inn (Atiantte A 57th) 



Fall is the season for indoor gardening 



If you are like most 
happy gardeno^ who find 
their own bit of heaven in 
the green and leafy worid, 
the end of the outdoor 
gardening season is a dis- 
appointment that can only 
be tempered by a lush and 
blooming indoor jungle. 
Or you may have a purple 
thumb and would just like 
to have a few pots of 
greoioy to help fight the 
winter doldrums. Whether 
you are an avid green 
thumb, an occasional 
gardener or less, fall is the 
perfect season to spend a 
little extra time on your 
household collection. 
Since so many house- 
plants spend the summer 



on the porch, patio and 
the like, start your kdoor 
gardening by moving this 
greenery inside. Despite 
the fact that many plants 
sUy green until the first 
fh>st, houseplants are sim- 
ply not that tough. Bring 
them m w^ien tempetures 
dip as low as 50T. TTiis 
gives them time to adjust 
to their new climate before 
the furnace starts running 
and drying out the inside 
air. The big move back 
outdoors win also be 
easier if you plan ahead. 
Your plants have un- 
doubtedly grown large 
and lush in the outdoors 
and will often need repott- 
ing. Everything should be 



checked for bugs, one real 
hazard of the outdoors, 
washed down, sprayed 
with insecticide and 
isolated from other house- 
bound plants for several 
days. 

In their annual autumn 
haste to bring in the 
toiderest plants, many 
gardeners tend tM over- 
look a lot of plants 
thought of primarly as 
outdoor plants. Gera- 
niums can handle life 
indoors as can fiischias, 
lantana and agapanthus. 
Don't expect a lot of 
bloom but do eiyoy their 
variant foliages. 



Since most plants are 
quite sensitive to the sea- 
sons and enter a dormant 
time in the winter months, 
you should begin to ease 
up on fertilizing. Remem- 
ber also that the sun sinks 
lower in the sky and its 
light is more direct on 
windows. More direct 
light and the accompany- 
ing heat can damage 
tender specimens. Watch 
for distress signals and 
move your plants accord- 
ingly. 

Perhaps the greatest 
hazard to indoor garden- 
ing is dry air, even more of 
See INDOOR GARDENING, page 12 



Lawn establishment class 
to be held at library 

A program on "Lawn Establishment" 
including information on fertilizing and control of 
insects, disease and weeds of an established lawn 
will be presented at the Virginia Beach Kempsville 
Branch Library. The program will be held on 
Thursday, September 20, from 7-9 p.m. 

Registration is required and can be completed at 
the front desk of the library or by calling 420- 
2270. For furiher information contact Bob 
Halcums at 420-2270. 



Holiday Inn (Atlantk Ave. A 39th) 
Hilton Inn 
Sheraton Inn 
Ingram's Pharmacy (2Sth) 
Post Office 
News Center 
Barr's Pharmacy 
KOA Campground 
Travel Park 
LONDON BRIDGE AREA 
A A P (Kings Shopping Ctr.) 
"TaiiWltyiiiififven1*if.1=— - — ■' - 
Va. Beach Sun BIdg. 
MunNns Drug Store 

PLAZAGREENRUN-PEMBROKE AREAS 

~: Peoples- Plan S ho p pin g Cfa-. =-— 

Peoples • Pembroke Shopphig Mali 
7-11 (Lynnshores Dr. A Holland Rd.) 
Big Star (Holland Rd.) 

KEMPSVILLE AREA 

Farm Fresh (Arrowhead Shop. Ctr.) 

COURTHOUSE AREA 

7-11 

COLLEGE PARK AREA 

BeLo's (Indfain River Rd. A Milt. Hwy.) 
Peoples (College Park Square) 



I 



SAVE 

*50 



PUMPKINS 



from page 8 

attached. This stem may 
drop off when the gourd 
dries, but will be attractive 
if it remains on the fruit. 

Gourds must be han- 
dled with care to avoid 
bruising and scratching. 
Such damage may cause 
rot and unsightly spots. 
Wipe each fruit with a 
i;loth dampened with rub- 
bing alcohol, to remove 
dirt and decay organisms, 
if the gourds arc quhe 
dirty they may be washed 
in warm «^py water. 
Rinse in clean water to 
which a household disin- 
fKt«u has been Mi(M. 
Dry'each fruit careftilly 
with a soft cloth. 

The gourds should be 



cured for about a week in 
a well ventilated porch, 
garage, or shed. PIkc the 
fruit one layer deep on 
shallow slatted trays, or 
on an open shelf. Turn the 
gourds «K:h day and dis- 
card any that shrivel or 
develop soft spots. 

During the first week of 
curing the skin will be- 
come quite hard and 
tough. An additional 
period of about thrM 
weeks will be needed for 
complete drying. For this 
proceu, the gourds may 
be stored in shallow wood 
t-r cardboard trays in a 
well ventilated room or 
garage. Continue to in- 
spect the fruit every few 
days to remove any which 
shrivel, or show eviden<% 
of decay. 




Holland bulbs give your 
garden bright, beautiful 
flowers from late 
winter 'til June. 




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10 VIRGINIA BEA CH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 19. 1919 



Virginia Beach 




Virginia: In the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach 

Leona R. Payton, 

Complainant, 

vs. 



7401 Joy Drive, Gautier, 
Mississippi, it is ordered 
that Johnnie Earl Siler do 
^appear on or before the 
17th of October, 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 



Shirley O'Neil Payton, Acopy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
and Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 

David Alan Payton, an Hary J. Hicks, p.q. 
infant, 4316-C Virginia Beach 

Blvd. 
and Va. Beach, Va. 

Roger Clark Payton, an 8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 
infant. 



and 

Vicki Lynn Payton, an 
infant, 

and 

Michael O'Neil Payton, 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF HEARING 

The object of this suit is 
for the Complainant to 
establish, by satisfactory 
evidence, that Shirley 
O'Neil Payton, her 
husband, is deceased 
based upon a presumption 
of death arising from the 
fact that Shirley O'Neal 
Payton has been absent 
uninterrupted years and 
has not been heard from 
since his original 
disappearance oh August 
18, 1971. 

Pursuant to Section 
64.1-105 et. seq. of the 
Code of Virginia, order of 
publication has been 
published for four (4) 
successive weeks in the 
. Virginia Beach Sun, 
-ending on June 20, 1979. 
Therefore, pursuant to 
Section 64.1-108 of the 
Code of Virginia, notice is 
hereby given that on 
October 12, 1979, a day 
more than two weeks after 
this advertisement, a 
hearing will be held in the 
Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, at 
which the Court will hear 
evidence concerning the 
alleged absence of the 
supposed decedent and the 
circumstances and 
duration thereof. 

Leona R. Payton 

By: James B. Lonergan 

Of Counsel 

James B. Lonergan, 

Esquire 

Smith, Dickerson & 

Home 

Holland Plaza Office 

Bldg.. Suite 127 

41 76 South Plaza Trail 

Virginia Beach, VA 23452 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 22nd day of August, 
1979. 

Annie R. Siler, Plaintiff, 
against Johnnie Earl Siler, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of one years 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of ^ 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
24th day of August, 1979. 

In re: Adoption of Keasha 
Arlentheia Daniels 

In Chancery #C-79- 1625 

By: James Russell Walke 
and Michelle Walke, 
Petitioners 

To: Edward Keith Taylor 
375 Greenleaf Drive 
Norfolk, Va. 

ORDER 

This day came James 
Russell Walke and 
Michelle Walke, 
Petitioners, and 

represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, 
Keasha Arktheia Daniels, 
by James Russell Walke 
and Michelle Walke, 
husband and wife, and 
affidavit having been 
made and filed that 
Edward Keith Taylor, a 
natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia and 
that due diligence has been 
used by or in behalf of the 
said Petitioners to 
ascertain in which County 
or corporation the said 
natural parent is, without 
effect, the last known post 
office address being: 375 
Greenleaf Drive, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Edward Keith 
Taylor appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Marc Jacobson, p.q. 
6663 Stoney Point South 
Norfolk, Va. 23502 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 3 1 St day of August, 
1979. 

William Fred Weeks, 
Plaintiff, against Gail 
Steinhilber Weeks, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce from 
Gail Steinhilber Wwks 
upon the grounds of the 
parties have li\ ed separate 



and apart and without 
cohabitation and without 
interruption for a period 
of more than one year. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
6427 Walther Avenue, 
Apartment E, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21206 it is 
ordered that GaU Stein- 
hilber Weeks do appear on 
or before the 23rd of 
October, 1979, /and do 
what may be necnsary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy-Teste: 
Philip E. Landrum 
Board of Trade Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 

9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON 
THE 6TH DAY OF 
SEPTEMBER, 1979. 

In re: Adoption of Farah 
Ferdeen Alfad Abbas an 
infant under the age of 
fourteen (14) years, and 
Change of Name to Farah 
Alfad Atangan 

By: Lope V. Atangan and 
Nadira A. Atangan, Hus- 
band and Wife, Peti- 
tioners,. ^,„^^^,^., .,. , 

ORDER 

This day came Lope V. 
Atangan and Nadira A. 
Atangan, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above ''named infant(s), 
Farah Ferdeen Alfad 
Abbas, by Lope V. Atan- 
gan and Nadira A. Atan- 
gan, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that 
Ferdausi Yahya Abbas, a 
natural parent of said 
child(ren), is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
c/o Zorayda Tamano, 30 
Bohol Avenue, Quezon 
City, Philippines. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Ferdausi 
Yahya Abbas appear 
before this Court within 
ten (10) days after publica- 
tion of this Order and 
indicate his/her attitude 
toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to pro- 
tect his interest in this 
matter. 

A copy teste: 
John V. Fortress, clerk 
By: Raymond W. 
Bjorkman, D. C. 

John D. Hooker, Jr. p.q. 
Post Office Box 6363 
Virginia Beach, VA 23456 

9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3 



In re: Adoption of Victor 
Manuel Gonzalez 
Herrera, Minor Boy 

In Chancery #C-79- 1622 

By: Jose Arturo Gonzalez 
& Ana Echenique 
Gonzalez, Petitioners 

To: Ana Rosa Herrera 
CallellNo. 1342 
Bogota, Colombia 

'order 

This day came Jose 
Arturo Gonzalez and Ana^ 
Jan^t Echenique 
Gonzalez, Petitioners, and 
and represented that the 
object of this proceeding 
is to effect the adoption of 
the above named 
infant(s), Victor Manuel 
Gonzalez Herrera, by Jose 
Arturo Gonzalez and Ana 
Janet Echenique 
Gonzalez, husband and 
wife, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Ana Rosa Herrera, a 
natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being: Calle 11 
No. 1342, Bogota, 
Colombia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Ana Rosa 
Herrera appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, of 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Raymond W; Bjorkratu^ 
Deputy Clerk 



Virginia: In the Oerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
22nd day of August, 1979. 



Tom C. Smith, p.q. 
2604 Pacific Avenue 
Va. Beach, Va., 23451 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
22nd day of August, 1979. 

In re: Adoption of 
Danielle Sassone and 
change of name to 
Danielle Barth 

In Chancery #C-79-1328 

By: Gary R. Barth and 
Cynthia H. Barth, 
Petitioners. 

To: Daniel A. Sassoon 
71 Illinois Street 
Rochester, New York 
14609 

ORDER 

This day came Gary R. 
Barth and Cynthia H. 
Barth, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant 
Danielle Sassone, and 
change of name to 
Danielle Barth, by Gary 
R. Barth and Cynthia H. 
Barth, husband wife, and 
affidavit having been 
made and filed that Daniel 
A. Sassoon, a natural 
parent of said child, is a 
non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 71 Illinois Street, 
Rochester, New York 
14609. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Daniel A. 
Sassoon appear before 
this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of 
this Order and indicate his 
attitude toward the 



proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: r 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
Deputy Clerk 

Richard J. Tavss, p.q. 
P.O. Box 3747 

Norfolk, Va. 23514 

8/29,9/5,9/12,9/19 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 28th day of August, 
1979. 

Carl Ernest Mason, 
Plaintiff, against Anna 
Elizabeth Mason, 
Defendant. 

ORDER bF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of more than 
one year's separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the state of 
Virginia, the last known 

' post office address being: 
766 Ridge Drive, Mantua, 
New Jersey 08051, it is 
ordered that Anna 
Elizabeth Mason do 
appear on or before the 
19th of October, 1979, 
"and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 

■t mterest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Robert H. Bennett, p.q. 
3330 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

9/5,9/12,9/19,9/26 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 6th day of September, 
1979. 

Eddie Harold Smith, 
, Plaintiff, against Donna 
Ann Powell Smith, De- 
fendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of , this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said Defendant, upon 
the grounds of one year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
Beacham's jApartments, 
Apt. 551, Jacksonville, 
North Carolina 28540 it is 
ordered that Donna Ann 
Powell Smith do appear 
on or before the 30th of 
October, 1979, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Whiteman &. Sadler 
6330 Newtown Road 
Norfolk, Virginia 

9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Juvenile and 
Domestic Relations 
District Court of the City 
of Virginia B^xAi, on the 
27th day of August, 1979. 



Commonwealth of 
Virginia 

In re: Michael Paul Meier 
Michelle nmn Meier 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this 
proceeding is the 
termination of the residual 
parental rights of Patricia 
Ann Meier and Paul John 
Meier to their children, 
Michael Paul Meier & 
Michelle mnm Meier. The 
consequences of. 
termination of residual 
parental rights are that a 
parent or parents forever 
relinquish all parental 
rights such as, but not 
limited to, the rights to 
companionship, associa- 
tion, religious training, 
education, discipline, 
guidance, maintenance 
and all decision making 
concerning the children's 
welfare. And further it is 
to commit said infants to 
the care and custody of 
the Virginia Beach 
Department of Social 
Services with the right of 
said agency to consent to 
the infants' adoption. 

And an affidavit having . 
been made and filed that 
Patricia Ann Meier and 
Paul John Meier is a 
proper party to this 
proceeding; but due 
diligence has been used to 
ascertain in what county 
or corporation he or she 
is, without effect, it is 
ORDERED that Patricia 
Ann Meier and Paul John 
Meier do appear here 
within 10 days after due 
publicaiiDalfetcof , and-ttc " 

protect her/his interest in 
this suit. — ^*~ — --- - 



Doumar, Pincus, Knight 
and Harlan, p.q. 
1350 Virginia National 
Bank Bldg. 
Norfolk, Va. 

9/5,9/12.9/19.9/26 



In the Qerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 6th day of September, 
1979. 

Diane Dean Shelton, 
Plaintiff, against John 
Shawn Shelton, Defend- 
ant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant upon 
the groimds of one year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last know 
post office address being: 
c/o General Delivery, At- 
lanta. Georgia it is 
ordo-ed that John Shawn 
Shelton do appear on or 
before the 30th of Octo- 
ber. 1979, and do what 
may be necessary to pro- 
tect his interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Frank E. Butler, III 
2420 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23454 

9/12T'^/l5,%§6; ldp3 ' • 



to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of on*; (1) 
year separation. 
And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defoidant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last kn^n 
post office address being 
Unknown it is ordered 
that Leslie D. Armbrust 
do appear on or before the 
31st of October, 1979, and 
do what may be necessary 
to protect his interest in 
this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Shames and Byrum 
2145 Old Greenbrier Road 
Chesapeake, Va. 

9/12, 9/19. 9/26, 10/3 



A Copy Teste: 

Elizabeth E. Henley, 

Qerk 

Kathy S. Brothers. D.C. 

Carolyn Tucker. Va. 
Beach Dept. 

Petitioner of Social 
Services 

Juvenile & Domestic 
Relations District Court 
Municipal Center 
Va. Beach. Va. 23456 

9/5,9/12,9/19.9/26 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 27th day of August. 
1979. 

Horace J. Savage. 
Plaintiff, against Kay 
Linda Savage. Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Hie object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce from 
the bonds of matrimony 
from the said defendant, 
upon the grounds of 
a)ntinuous separation in 
excess of one year. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the Sute of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
216 Marion Ave.. Carlisle. 
Pennsylvania 17013, it is 
ord^ed that Kay Uula 
Savage do appear cm or 
before the ^5th of 
October, 1979. and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in thu 
salt. 

A cojqf-Trate: 

John V. Fentress, CMt 

Unda Noel Hill, D.C. 



In the Qerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 6th day of September, 
1979. 

Sandra P. Lewis, Plain- 
tiff, against Randall C. 
Lewis. Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the groimds of one year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
,451 West Broadway. 
Apartment 17. Eugene. 
Oregon it is ordered that 
Randall C. Lewis do 
appear on or before the 
30th of October. 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Michael Wayne Price 
6330 Newtown Road 
Norfolk. Virginia 23S02 

9/12. 9/19, 9/26. 10/3 



In the Oak's Otfke of 
the Orcuit Court of the 
Gty of Virginia Be»;h, on 
tlw 6th day of September. 
1979. 

Barbara Bradford Arm- 
iMTU^, Plabitiff. aganst 
Lalie D. Armlmut, De- 
femtot. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

' Tlw object of tUs suit is 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 6th day of September. 
1979. 

Theodore Traylor, Jr., 
Plaintiff, j^ainst Queen 
Victoria Ramson Traylor, 
Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of the parties 
having lived separate and 
apart witl^out cohabita- 
tion and without iitterrup- 
tion for period in excess of 
(Oonayear. nu>^ • ""• -■<" 

been made and filed that 
the defendant is not 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
1761 Clifton Avenue. 
Springfield. Ohio it is 
ordered that Queen Vic- 
toria Ramson Traylor do 
appear on or before the 
2nd of Novonber, 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 



A copy-Teste: 

Stuart R. Gordon, p.q. 
P.O. Box 2257 
Virginia Beach. Virginia 
23452 

9/12, 9/19. 9/26, 10/3 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 21st day of August, 
1979. 

Ray Edward Bragg, 
Plaintiff, against Lynn 
Esther Bragg, Defoidant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii (a 
divorM from the bond of 
matinumy) from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of separation 
lasting for a period of 
more than one year uiuier 
the provisions of S«^on 
20-91(9) of the Code of 
Virginia (1950) as 
amended. 

And an affidavit iMving 
beoi made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
residait of the Sute of 
^%Vnia. the last known 
pmt office address bdi^ 
150 Valeside N.W. 
MassilkMi, Ohio 44646. it 
is ordered that Lynn 



"^"i^p'^^^w"^"^^ 



•^nmmnw'mm^mmi.m-mi m ■ wiiw wi 



J','J JlJ*^^-M-fc*J 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1979 11 



Viriinia BMch PuMc Noimcoot'd. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



Virginia: 



BMher Bragg do linear bo 
or httott the 11th of 
October, 1979. and do 
what may be neomary to 
ivotcct htr interest in this 
snit. 

Acopy-Teste: 
John V. Fentt-ess. Oerk 
Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
Deputy Oerk 

Theodore A. Boyce,p.q. 

P.O. 80x2193 

Va. Beach, V8.234S2 

8/29,9/3,9/12,9/19) 



Ifl,tbe Clerk's Office of 
the Orctiit Coiut of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 13th day of Sep- 
tember, 1979. 

Martha Susan Colwell 
Dowd, Plaintiff, a^pdnst 
James Francis Dowd, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to oMain a divOToe a 
vincuk) matrhnonii f^om 
the s^d defendant, upon 
the grounds of (mw year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the %ate of 
Vi^inia, the last kaomi 
post office address being 
1119 Harrison Street, 
Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
yuokt 19124 it is ordered 
that James Francis Dowd 
do appear on or befme the 
8th of November, 1979. 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect ||is 
interest in this suit. 

A c(q)y-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 



By: Raymond 
Bjorkman, D. C. 



W. 



VIRGINIA: IN, THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE Cmf,0# VIR- 
GINIA BEACbiON THE 
5TH DAY OF SEPTEM- 
BER, 1979. 

Re: Estate of George! R. 
Reynolds, Deceased. 

ORDER 

It aniearing that a t^^ort 
of the accounts of Vint 
and Merdiants National 
Bank, Norfolk, Virginia, 
Executor of the Estate of 
Gewge R. Reynolds, de- 
ceased, and of the debts 
and demands agahist his 
Estate have been filed in 
the Oerk's Office of this 
Court, and that six 
mcmths has dapsed since 
the qualificaticm, <m mo- 
tion of the ExecutOT. 

It is ORDERED that 
the creditors of, and all 

others interested in, the 

Estate do show cause, if 
any they ean. on.the 2ht 
^day of September, 1979. 
at 10:00 o'clock A.M., VIRGINIA: IN THE 
before this Court at itt>rTxaRCLp[, COl^T. OF 
c oiu l l i X ia^iSiiaiat- thfcTATHB otV^OF VI|i. 
payment and deUvery of GINIA BEACH 
the Estate of Oee^ R. 
Reyndds, deceased, to the 
Legatees without requir- 
ing refunding bonds. 

IT IS FURTHER 
ORDERED that the fore- 
gohig portion of this 
ORDER be published 
once a week for two 
successive weeks fai the 
Virginia Beadi Sim, a 
newspaper having gennal 
circulati<Mi in the City of 
Vi^ink Beadi, Virgin!^. 



Tom C. Smith, p.q. 
2604 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
234S1 

9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10 



In Re: Estate of 
Komedy, deceased 



Jack 



A Copy Teste 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

Thomas A. Ccmnw 
Ansell ft Connmr 
4336 Virghiia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beadi, Vbginia 
23432 

9/12, 9/19 



LEGAL NOTICE 

TAKE NOTICE THAT 
ON SEPTEMBER 28. 
1979 at lOKX) A.M. at the 
premises of Tidewater 
AMC/Jeep/Honda. 3132 
Vii^inia Bei^ Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
23432, the undersigned 
wiU seU « public auctiM, 
for cash, resovlng umo 
itsdf the right to bid. the 
folhnnag MoMr vdddR 



SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

It q>pearing that a tt- 
port of the accounts of J. 
Davis Reed, III Pmonal 
Rqwesentative of die Est- 
ate of Jack Koinedy, de- 
ceased, and of the debts 
and (temands against his 
Estate has been ftoed in 
the Oerk's Office mi six 
m<mths have ehqieed sfaice 
the qualificati<»i, on nK>- 
tion <tf Rc^wrt L. Simp- 
um, Jr., Adnrii^trator, 
d.b.n.. it is ORDERED 
that the creditors oC, and 
all othos interested in, the 
Ettate do show cause, if 
any they can, on the 28th 
di^ of September, 1979. 
at 10:00 a.m., befwe this 
Court at its coiutnMHn. 
apunst the paymoit and 
delivery of the Estate of 
Jade Kennedy, deceased 
to the distributees tlMreof . 
with or without requiring 
refunding b<mds as the 
Court ftirther presoibes. 

The Oerk is directed to 
cnise this Ord«^ to be 
pubUdied once a week for 
two s^cettrive wedcs hi 
The Virghiia Beach Sua, a 
new^MpCT of graeral dr- 
culatfcm awl inibii^ied in 
the City of Virginia 
Beadi. ^i^mia. and the 
Otyof^torfoik, Viigfaiia. 



DESCR1FTKH>I 


A Qq^ Teste: 


\9T80naOa 


John V. Fentress, Oerk 


^EIALi 


By: Raymond W. Bjork- 


A8C4&CII»712 


nuio.D.C. 


Tklewatcr AliC/Jcep 


I ask for this: 


Honda 






Robert L. Snvson. Jr. 




4330 Professional Orde 




Pembroke Professional 


F.C.Rice 


Park 


QmiKitdter 


Virginia Beach, Va 23434 



The regular meeting of the Coundl of Virgfaita Bowh 
will be hdd in the Council Chambers of the 
Administration Buildii«. City Hall, Princess Anne 
Statfon, Vir^nia Beach, VirgbOa on Mmuiay Octob«r 8. 
1979. at 2:00 p.m.. at which time the following 
qqilicaticms wiU be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTIdCr CLASSIFICAIION: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

1. 

An Ordmance upon Apiriication of Thomas S. and 
Margaret K. Moore for a Ohmvc of Zoatag DMrlct 
OaaslflcatieB from O-l Office District to B-2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
kMated on the Nmth side of South Lynnhavoi Road 
beghining at a pohit 100 feet mote or less Wot of 
Lyrnihavoi Parkway, mniifaig a distance of 136 feet 
along the North wte of South Lynnhaven Road, 
runiring a distance of 120 feet along the Wettem 
property line, running a distance of 139.3 feet along the 
Northern propnty line and runnmg a distance of 1^ 
feet along the Eastern property line. Said parcel 
contahis .417 acre. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

2. 

An Ordinance upon application of Lake Edward North, 
Inc.. for a Chai^ of Zodng INstikt OaarilicatioB 
from B-2 Community-Business District to A-2 
Apartment District on certam property located on the 
Nmh side of Hampshire Lane banning at a point 310 
feet West of Siuniey Lane, running a distance of 163.34 
feet along the North side of Hampdiire Lane, running a 
(Ustance of 130 feet along the Western property Une. 
running a distance of 163 feet along the NOTthem 
l^operty line and running a distance of 130 feet along 
the Eastan property line. Said pared contams .33 acre. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

3. 

An Ordfaianoe upon Api^cation of Lake Edward 
North, Inc., for a Change of Zoalag Dhtrlct 
ChsaiflcatioB from A-2 Apartment District to B-2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
located on the South side of Hampshire Lane beginning 
at a pofait 391.61 feet East of Baker Road, running a 
distance of 1239.13 feet along the South side of 
Hampshire Lane, running a distance of 170.33 feet in an 
Easterty direction, running a distance of 222 feet in a 
Northeriy directira, running a distance of 196.33 feet in 
en Easterly direction, running a distance of 170.07 feet 
b a Northo-Iy direction, running a distance of 323 feet 
hi an Easterly directicm, running a distance of 100 feet 
aloiigitlH» ^^^04a!H^^^^uy Lane, ranning a distance 
otS^^tK^iM Ww Mi bM iiwction. nuuifli a tfisteiooe'or 
473 feet fai a Southerly <ttrection, running a distanee of 
1381.67 feet akmg the Wot sde of New^wn Road, 
running a distance of 230 feet m a Northwesto-ly 
dhection, running a distance of 70 feet in a NorthCTly 
dfaection and runnmg a distance of 230 feet in a 
Northwesterly dfafcction. Sdd pared contains 13.3 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

4. 

An Ordinance upra Aiqilication of Virghiia De Castro, 
Manudito O. Calayo and Ma. Anton V. CaUyo for a 
Ouuite of Zoatag Distikt ClMslflcatioa from 1-2 
Ifeavy Industrial Distrid to B-2 CMnmunity-Business 
District on certain property located at the Northwest 
intosection of Nmthampton Boulevard and Burton 
Stittion Road, rumimg a distance of 44.01 feet along the 
West side of NorthamjMon Boulevard, running a 
distance of 278.40 fed in a Northwnterly direction, 
runnhig a distance of 73 fed in a Northeasto-fy 
directira, running a distance of 416.30 feet in a 
Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 233.37 
fed in a Southwesterly direction, runnmg a distance of 
336.44 fed in a Southeasterly du^ction, and running a 
distance of 203.41 feet along the North side of Burton 
Sution Road. Said pared contains 4.168 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 



of Shdl Road, running a distance of 312 fed along the 
East side of Hodgman Road, running a distance of 
736.88 feet along the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 355.M feet along the Eastern property line 
and running a distance of 336.37 feet along the 
Northern property line. Said parcel contains 7.434 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

f 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: • 



An Ordinance upon Application of James M. & Karen 
M. Arnhold and Heri>ert B. and Deborah T. Davis for a 
CondlUoaal Use Permit for dune disturbing activity on 
Ortain property located on the North side of Ocean 

View Avenue beginning at a point 290 feet West of ^ 

Mortons Road, running a distance of 25 feet along the Lot 93, Section 2, Lakcvillc Estates, 980 siinnyside 

North side of Ocean View Avenue, running a distance Drive. 

of 100 feet in a Northeriy direction, running a distance 

of 25 feet in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 

130 feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance of 

30 feet along the Northern property line and running a 

distance of 250 feet along the Eastern property line. 

Said pard contains .23 acre. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 
City Clerk 

9/19,9/26 



as required and of 5 feet to a 5 foot side yard setback 
(west side) instmd of 10 feet as required on Lots 23 and 
24, Block 1, Chesapeake Park, Ocean View Avenue. 
Bayside Borough. 

14. Robert B. and Barbara H. Cromwell, Jr. request a 
variance of 30 feet to a "O" front yard setback instead 
of 30 feet as required on Lots 21 and 22, Block 1. 
Chesapeake Park, Ocean View Avenue. Bayside 
Borough. 

15. Vernard F. Wayner requests a variance of 30 feet to 
a f*0" front yard setback instead of 30 feet as required 
on Lots 19 and 20, Block 1, Chesapeake Park, Ocean 
View Avenue. Bayside Borough . 

16. Mason B. Dickens requests a variance of 10 feet to a 
O" side yard setback instead of 10 feet as required on 



9/19 



9/19, 9/26 



An Ordinance upon Application of R.G. Moon for a 
Chaaic of Zmriiv Dlstrkt daadflcatloa from R-3 
Residoitial Distrid to A-1 Apartment District on 
cntabi pnqiaty located on the South side of Moores 
Ptmd Road beginnfaigat a pouit 1363 fed East of Bakor 
Road, runnhig a distance of 1 190 feet aloi^ the South 
side of Moores Pood Road, ruimiiig a distance of 
333.60 fed atong the Easten prt^ierty line, runniiig a 
distance of I290.n fed along the Southan i^t^ierty 
line and nmnmg a distamx of ^2.62 feet along the 
Western i^i^wrty Une. Said pared contams 10.134 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. ' 



An Ordmawe iqwn ^q^:^(m of Stafford Pn^erties, 
Inc., for a C|aa|t of Zoriag DMifct OaHlflealloa 

from R-8 Reddatial IXttiict to A-2 A^wrtment Diaaia 
on certahi jvopoty located (m the East tide of neanuc 
Hoiw R<^ b^tann^ at a pcant 283 fed SoMh of 
Nordi Ckeoiwdl RMd, ruonmg a distaiKe of 20 fed 
alffi^ the Eatt ride <tf meawre Houm Road, naudi^ a 
dMMice of 300 fed more ot le» akmg the ScHitten 
propCTty Une, running a dirtaiMX of 1 30 fe^ BMre or less 
ak^ the Eai^ property Une, running a dtttance of 80 
feet nmn (« kss akmg the N(»ttesn imymy Une, 
nini^ a <&teace of 133 fed m A Southo^ dbedion 
and runnmg a distance of 200 feM mtxe « le» in a 
Wea^fy diredi(». SaM pared ctmtaiu 1.003 acre. 
BAYSnSBCmCHJCHI. 



An Otttnance ^k» Appttatkm of V^ua htatoud 
Bak for a Cku^t of ImN ndrfd flwinrallsa 
from R.3 ReddeittW Distrid to M U^ latairial 
Dtel» 00 o«tda VKi^mv ktmtd cm tte Mm dde of 
Hoc^aan Rood b^ini^ « a pt^t 643.80 te» South 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals wiU 
conduct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, October 3, 
1979. at 7:30 P.M. in the Council Chambers, 
Administration Building^ Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. The following applications will appear 
on the agenda. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. Barry C. and Diana J. Brown request a variance of 2 
fed to an 8 foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
requh-ed (enlarge and enclose existing saeened porch) 
on Lot 9, Block 12. Section E. Cape Henry, 208 69th 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

2. Comet Construction Corporation by Angdo J. 
Carawana, President, requests a variance of 2 feet to a 
23 foot side yard adjacent to a street (Little Lake Drive) 
instead of 23 feet as required on Lot 6, Section 2, Trant 
Berkshire, Little Lake Court. Lynnhaven Borough. 

' 3. Rol8nd-Bi^8n#OBii'Soott>tequest a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
buildhig adjacent to a public street on Lot 12, Block U, 
Sedion 3, ^chwood Gardens, 344 Crosby Ro^. 

Lynnhaven Borough. 

t 

4. (kry W. Seay requests a variance of 3 feet to a 40 
foot building height instead of 33 feet in height as 
aUowed (single family dweUing) on Lot 1, Replat on 
Rudee Hdghts, Harbour Point, 509 Harbour Point. 
Lynnhaven Borough . 

5. Trace D. Clancy requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a buUding 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building 
adjacent of a pubUc stred on Site 0-14, Glydon Village, 
1311 Glydon Drive. KempsviUe Borough. 

6. Ddmar-Skaggs and George Lineberry by Grover 
Wright, Attorney, requests a variance of 10 feet to a 
"O" setback from both Atlantic Avenue and 9th Street 
instead of 10 feet each as required and of 58 parking 
spaces to "O" parking spaces instead of 58 parking 
spaces as reqwred (amusement center) on south 53 feet 
of Lot 11, Block 10, Plat #2, Virginia Beach 
Devdopment Co., 900 AtUmtIc Avenue. Virghua Beach 
Borou^. 

7. Thomas Buton C(»grove, Contract Owner, by 
Girard C. Larkin, Jr., Attorney, requests a variance of 
10 feet to a 10 foot front yard setback instead of 20 feet 
as required on Lou 17, 18, 19, Block 62, Shadowlawn 
He^ts, Goldsboro Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

8. Robert Dunnington requests a variance to aUow an 
enlargement of a nonconforming structure where 
I»-<Ail^t«l (single family residoice) on Lot 8, Nock D, 
Viiifaiia Beach Park, 413 19th Street. Virginia Beach 
Borvwgh. 

9. Leon B. Hubiak requests a variance of 3 feet to a 7 
foot ride yard setb«:k instead of 10 feet as requutd (east 
side) <m Lou 15, 17, 19 and 21, Block 56, Shadowhiwn 
Hdghu, 819 Goldsboro Avenue. Virginia Bnch 
Borough. 1 

10. Ulysses V. and (Mma A. ^'va request a variance of 
2 fed in foice height to a 10 foot foice mstead of an 8 
foot C^oe as allowed (encl(»e a tennis raurt) on Lot %, 
Blodc D, SecticH) 5, Larkspur McmIows, 705 Southleaf 
Drive. KempsviUe Borough. 



11. Wl^un M. Brown requesu a variamvof 5 fe« to a 
5 foot rear yard setback mstead of 10 fMt as reqiured 
(ptrt^ m IM 16, Uock C, Section 1, Huntington, 
3416 HMens Road. KonpsviUe Bormigh. 

12. (^or F. ftuter, IV, requesu a ^«riance of 5 feet to 
a 10 foM Ate yard setback instoul of 13 feet as requu^ 
(wert Ak) on L<A 65, Sectim 12-B, Kmp> Gnmt, 
Cov^i^de Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

13. James F. and Olive O. Iliomton reque^ a variance 
of 30 feet to a "O" front yard setback fautead of 30 feet 



17. KempsviUe Presbyterian Church requests a vari«[nce 
of 9 feet to 44 feet in height instead of 35 feet in height 
for a structure as allowed (church) on a 7 acre Parcel, 
part of 25.51 1 acre site, Plat showing apartment area of 
Fairfield for Fairfield Devdopment Corporation, 805 
KempsviUe Road. KempsviUe Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1 . General Machine and Welding Corporation by Bruce 
B. Mills, Attorney, requests a variance of 2.5 feet to a 
2.5 foot side yard setback instead of 5 feet as required 
(cast side) and of 7.5 feet to a 2.5 foot side yard setback 
instead of 10 feet as required (west side) on Lot 29, 
Block 138, Ridgecrest, 24th Street. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

2. Aragona-Garda Enterprises, Inc. requests a variance 
of 36.25 square feet of sign allowance to 76.25 square 
feet of sign allowance instead of 40 square feet of sign 
area as allowed and to allow a second sign on the 
building where prohobited on Store 57, Pared R, 
Princess Anne Plaza Shopping Center, 3333 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. Lynnhaven Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 

W.L. Towers 
Secretary 

9/12,9/19 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF 
TFffi CITY OF VIR- 
GINLVBEACH 



Margard Lynn 
Petitioner. 



Lassiter, 



Penny S. Moreno, Plain- 
tiff, against Gilbert 
Marquez Moreno, Defen- 
dant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 



vs 

Lawrence Dale 
Sr., Defendant. 



WUson, 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this Peti- 
tion is to change the 
surnames of Jeffrey 
William Wilson, Kara 
Lynn WUson and Law- 
rwice Dale WUson, Jr., 
chUdroi of the petitioner 
herein and the defendant, 
from "WUson" to "Lass- 
iter." 

An affidavit has been 
made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resi- 
dent of the State of Vir- 
ginia, his last known post 
office address bdng the 
City of Clearwater. State 
of Florida; and that the 
petitioner has used due 
dUigence with no efied to 
ascertain the location of 
the defendant. 

It is ORDERED that 
this Order of PubUcation 
be pubUshed once a week 
for foot succnsive weeks 
m the Virginia Beach Sun, 
a newspqio- published in 
the City of Virginia 
Beach, Vu-ginia. 

AO^yTeste: , 
John V. Foitress. Oerk 

By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

I ask for this: 

Albot C. Sdkm. p.q. 
1500 Virginia National 
Bank BuUding 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10 



The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii (final 
divorce) fron| the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of a one year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
6311 Comstock Avenue, 
Apt. G, Whittier, Cali- 
fornia, 90602 it is ordered 
that Gilbert Marquez 
Moreno do appear on or 
before the 7th of Novem- 
ber, 1979, and do what 
may be necessary to pro- 
tect his interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 



By: Raymond, 
Bjorkman, D.C. 



W. 



In tlK Oerk's Offfce of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Vu-ginia Beach, on 
the 12th day of Sep- 
tember, 19^. 



John K. Moore, p.q. 
35th St. & Padfic Avenue 
Virginia Beach. Va 23451 

9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10 



VIRGINIA: IN '^ THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE OTY OF VIR. 
GINIA BEACH ON THE 
lOTH DAY OF SEP- 
TEMBER, 1979. 

Alden Lawrence Nichols, 
Complainant, vs Billie J. 
Nichds, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The objtci of the above 
styled suit is to i»rtitkm 
real e^ate tmned by U« 
Complainant and Defm- 

dam a«l fiilfy docriboi as 
fcrilows: 

AU that certA tot. piece 
(MT |»rcd of hnd. with tlK 
buihUi^ awl taqwow- 



■ai 




».t.f .•,»*»-»i»»»-» I. s iL mmv-mmmtmmmm^mmi^^^^i^m 



12 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUNDWEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1979 



Virginia Beach Public Notices cont'd. 



Councilwoman Oberndorf makes utilities fees proposals 



ments' thereon, situate, 
lying and being in the City 
of Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia, and known, num- 
bered and designated as 
Lot 37 in Blocic 6 as shown 
on that certain plat en- 
titled "Subdivision of 
Windsor Woods, Section 
Four, for Lineberry Con- 
struction Corporation, 
Lynnhaven Borough, Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia", 
which said plat is duly 
recorded in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in Map Book 66, at page 
4. Said deed is recorded in 
Deed Book 1098, at page 
570, indicating ownership 
is vested in Alden Law- 
rence Nichols and Billie J. 
Nichols, husband and 
wife. 

» 

And it appearing by the 
Affidavit filed according 
to law that Billie J. 
Nichols, the above named 
Defendant, is not a resi- 
dent of this state or if she 
her whereabouts 



unknown, it is therefore 
ORDERED that the said 
Billie J. Nichols do appear 
on or before the 8 day of 
November, 1979, in the 
Clerk's Office of the 
Court and do what is 
necessary to protect her 
interest. 

And it is further 
ORDERED that the Order 
by published once a week 
for four successive weeks 
in the Newspaper, printed 
in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia and the 
newspaper prescribed by 
our said Circuit Court. 

A Copy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

By: Linda Noel HiU D.C. 



I ask for this: 

Robert R. Carter, p.q. 
1200B Sparrow Road 
Chesapeake, Va. 23325 

9/19. 9/26, 10/3, 10/10 



IS 



are 



Virginia Beaeh birth;; 

Mr. and Mrs. William George Reese, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. John Walter Preston, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Deraps, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. William James Newton III, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Edward Hughes, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Joseph Fennewald, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Del Frederic Price, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis Steven Withers, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. James Robert Baldwin, twins - sons; 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kester Ramsey, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. James Randolph Jessee. son; 
Mr. and Mrs.- Barry Lynn Scott, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Judson Sigler, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Laine Home, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. George R. Patillo, daughter. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert James Gotte, son; 
Mr, and Mrs. Clarence Michael Fisher, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Thomas Shrieves, Jr., 
daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred John Heppner, Jr., son; 



Mr. and Mrs. Troy Jackson Buchanan, Jr., daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Combellick, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Jesse W. Joyner, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Graham Byrum, Jr., daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin B. Oribello, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Burnett Tilghman, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Dey Moss, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony S. Krzczuk, son; 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Elmo Rosson, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonidas Anthony, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Roque' Gerald, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Williams, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Gene Flanigan, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. William Paul Morris, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Dale Barger, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Johnson Moore, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Lee Allen, son; 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Dan McClanan, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Brian Lynn Funk, son; 

Mr. and Mrs. David G. Knepper, son; 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Wesser, twins - sons; 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Eugene Johnson, son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Jerome Johnson, twins - son 
and daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. William Cecil Dorsey, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin A. Saunders, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Patrick Hasemeyer, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick W. Hassler, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Allen Moreland, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. James Edward Plumley, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Coleman Jr., daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Myron Hanson, /aughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Suttmoell^r, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Keith E. Gibbs, son/ 
Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Claud Harris ^r., daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. John Warren Schropp, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Charley H. Reasor Jr., son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Brian J. Strattner, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert William Baker, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. James Madison Pierce Jr., daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. George Stanley Carter Jr., daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Robert Rasmussen, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. James Robert Wagner, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Brinn Campbell, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce R. Stewart, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wayne Moore, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Kirby B. Capps, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Linwood Gray Woodruff Jr., 
daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Preston L. Butler, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. John Michael Myers, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Billy Joe Dean, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Roger Foster, daughter. 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Gary Card, son; 
Mt^aj)d Mrs. Robert M. White, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. John VanNest Law, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald M. Estrada, son; 
Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Robert Davis, daughter; 
Mr. and Mrs. Mario Saraullo, daughter. 



Her proposals for easing the financial burden of 
utilities fees for middle income home owners would 
have more "credence," said Councilman Clarence A. 
Holland if Meyera Oberndorf were not running for 
public office. 

Councilwoman Oberndorf Monday afternoon at an 
informal session of council suggested extending utilities 
payments over a ten-year period and reducing the 
interest rates from eight to six percent. 

She also recommended that home owners be allowed 
to defer payment on half of the (SI 10 tap-on and $100 
clean out) fee for a year at six percent interest. 

Home owners are now required to pay the $210 tap- 
on and clean out fe« immediately along wiAi one- 
fourth of the line fee which is currently $780. The 
remainder of the line fee can be paid in three annual 
installments at 8 percent interest. Hardship cases are 
given special consideration. 

The installment payments* should be offered only to 
home owners and not to commercial corporations, she 
said. 

At the same meeting council discussed the session 
scheduled by Senator Peter K. Babalas's Senate Sub- 
Committee on Oct . 4. 

City Manager George L. Hanbury said that he didn't 
know what was going to be discussed, but understood 
that Babalas was interested in a bill stipulating that no 
fee imposed by a county, city or town shall be charged 
that will exceed the cost of the service. Hanbury said 



LINE FEES 



from page 1 

Councilman Donald Merrick also remarked that 
basing the rate on the flow rate is "very equitable." 

Hanbury said it was not only more equitable but 
easier to administer. 

Ervin said, "I don't think you can ever achieve 
(perfect) equity." 

Harris insisted that the changes "will encourage the 
type development the city doesn't want. He said that the 
Navy will decry the shortage in apartments and will 
build its own apartments, removing property from the 
tax rolls and cutting out private enterprise. 

Bartholomew, who has complained to council before 
about having to hook-up to city utilities, said that the 
Utility Department is supposed to be self-sufficient and 
"you're reducing rates.. .You all know everybody 
doesn't get the same treatment on sewer." 

Councilman J. Curtis Payne Jr. said that the city was 
"trying to lower the rates to entice more building for 
revenues." * 

Hanbury said the changes are based on uaeag which 
is not equivalent to stngle'faAnily usage. 

Cooiteit considered the fee chatifes m^hen hotel and 
motel interests complained that the line fees were 
deterring prospective buildings at the beach. 

Coumalwoman Meyera Oberndorf voted against all 

six of the ordinances. The ordinances set rates as 
follows: 

Motels and hotels, per unit, developer rate, sewer, 
$95; Approved by 8-2 vote; Mayor Patrick L. Standing 
and Oberndorf voting no. 

Structures with two or more family units per unit 
(apartments); develop^ fee; $135; Standing, Oberndorf 
and Vice Mayor J. Henry McCoy Jr. voting no. 

Water, line fee on city lines, motels and hotels, $310 
per unit; structures with two or more family units, $360; 
approved 6-4; Standing, Oberndorf, McCoy and 
Clarence A. Holland voting no. 

Sewer line fee on city lines, motels and hotels, $485, 
and structures with two ore more family units, $560; 
approved by a vote of 6-4 with Holland, McCoy, 
Oberndorf and Standing voting no. 

Sewer line fee for developer, structures with two or 
more family units, $1 10 per unit; approved by a vote of 
7-3 with McCoy, Oberndorf and Standing voting no. 



City studies borrow pit fees 



The City of Virginia 
Beach is considering 
establishing fees on bor- 
row pit excavation <» a 
percentage of the income 
basis. 

At present the dty has a 
fbced fee of six Vi cents a 
ton. City Manago* George 
L. Hanbury said that with 
the fixed fee the cost is 



passed on to the con- 
sumer. 

Discussing the matter at 
an informal snsion of 
City Council Monday 
afternoon, Hanbury said 
he is working with Chesa- 
peake Gty Manager John 
T. Maxwdl so that both 
dties can have the same 
rate. 



Beach City Council 
proceeds with plans 
for voting machines 



Virginia Beach City 
Council informally agreed 
Monday afternoon to pro- 
ceed with irians for vMing 
madiines to r^^er coun- 
cil vou$. 

City Mana^ Getnie 
L. Hanbury said that with 
council's go-ahead, he 
would obtttn prices of 
varkMs ss^ems. The cost 



is estimated at 
raatdy $5,000. 



ai;H>roxi- 



Councilmen J. Curtis 
Payne Jr. and George R. 
Ferrdl said they had no 
stnmg fedings about the 
madiues one way or 
aaotlmr. Coundtanan Rdd 
Ervin s^ then were " a 



that he has no problem with that, because the dty's 
utility charges pay for less than a third of the ccMt. 

Vice Mayor J. Henry McCoy Jr. said that he thought 
Babalas was concerned with inequitable fMs. Beach 
residents are charged various line fees, ranging from 
$440 to $780, depending on when they signed contracts 
with the city. Citizens have complained about the 
differences, but the city feels obligated by law to honor 
the contracts. 

Mrs. Oberndorf said there was "no question inflation 
is causing families to be pinched, producing a 
hardship." 

Holland said the lower fees were established 
originally to encourage people to sign up. "I voted for it 
but I'm sorry." 

He noted that ten yean was a long time for the line 
payments adding that if Nfrs. Oberndorf were not 
running for office he would jgive her suggestions more 
credence. 

Councilman J. Curtis Payne Jr. agreed that th^ move 
was "political, no doubt." 

Councilman Reid Ervin remarked, "Let's not belittle 
her suggestions because she is running for office." 

Mrs. Oberndorf is the Republican candidate for State 
Senate from the Kempsville area of Virginia Beach and 
Norfolk. 

City Manager George L. Hanbury said that he would 
like to take Mrs. Oberndorfs suggestion under 
consideration. 



Hanbury said that Babalas, who is running for 
reelection on the Democratic ticket, has indicated he 
wouM have his Senate hearing on Oct. 4 rather than 
Sept. 24 as originally reported when most of the coundl 
monbers plan to be out of town. 

Coundlman Donald Merrick said he spoke to 
Babalas, who indicated that he was inter«ited in having 
all the dties and towns use an assessment basis for 
utilities charges. 

In Virginia Bfach, property owners are charged tap- 
on fees and Une fe«. Merrick said he understood that 
Babalas though the fee system in Virginia Beach, 
Chesapeake and Fairfax were wrong. Norfolk has an 
assessment system, but in Virginia Beach, a property 
owner does not pay until he connects. * 

Hanbury noted that those dties that have assessment 
fees against property have thdr own water, the city also 
would not be able to charge a sewer maintenance fee 
under the system. 

Ervin said the people would be paying more with an 
assessment syston. 

Mrs. Oberndorf said that she has recdved calls from 
all over the dty and that the average family can't always 
come up with the $210 tap-on clean out fee. The attitude 
of the people, she said, is that the city took so long to 
get the water lines in, but that once they are in the 
people have to tie-in immediately. 

She also asked about whether a disclosure could be 
required of a seller telling the prospective buyer that the 
house is not hooked up to utilities. 



Commercial dredging of Rudee Inlet studied 



The establishment of a division within the 
Department of Public Works to handle all water-related 
activities is recommend«l in a report prepared by the 
Virginia Beach Research Team. 

The report, which covered the commerdal dredging 
of Rudee Inlet, was released Monday afternoon. It also 
recommends the appointment of a division head hired 
by the City of Virginia Beach and the retention of the 
Erosion Commission as a policy-setting body. 
Commission personnel, according to the 
recommendations, should become employees of this 
division. 

Everything would remain the same except that the 
day-to-day operations and management of the beach 
nourishment program would be the responsibility of the 
division head who should be a technical person with a 
degree in engineering and experience in dredge 
operatioiu. 

The study, directed by Patti Phillips, also 
recommends that the dty continue to pursue the 
possibility of getting the Army Corps of EinginaerB to 
assume the maintenance of RudM Inlet in the futura as 
part of the Beach Erosion and Hurricane Protection 
Plan and the feasibility of in-house hauling of sand. 

The report concludes that more effort be put in 



Reil to be given forum 



lot of 
madiines. 



pluses" in 



William Rdl, former 
utilities electrical engineer, 
who has been denied a 
forum before Virginia 
Beach City Council, will 
be given ten minutes on 
Oct. 15 to address council. 

Reil made charges in- 
volving the Utilities De- 
partment pertaining to 
safety, engineering designs 
and bad management 
decisions attributed to in- 
expoienced personnel. 

He resigned March 1979 
to give himself a forum 
after a hearing before the 
PasoBBcl Board i^ch he 
described as a "kangaroo 
court." 

A Mayor's committee 
consisting of Councilmen 
Clarence A. Holland, 
Reid Ervin and Donald 
W. Mo-rick, investigated 
the charges and rdeased a 
report in July. 

The rqwrt, adopted by 
council, induded the re- 
commendation that Rdl 
be denied any further 
forum before the council 
concerning this matter. 

Monday, Council- 
woman Meyva C%em- 
dorf asked that council 
allow Rdl to speak. He is 
a dtizen, no longer an 
employee, and feeb he has 
a right to speak, she said. 
The request was sutaiitted 
through the Cmmdl of 
Civic Organizations. 

ReO was in the C<»indl 
Chambo-s, as he has been 
at most meetings siiKX hb 
redgnatkm. but was not 
allowed to q)eak. Mayor 
Patrick L. Standing said 
that he would permit Rdl 
10 minutes, but only whan 
monbers of the utillttes 
stsktf who have b<»n the 
brunt of Rdl's char^ am 
also pnsent their ^de of 
the story. '1 wiO not Uncn 



to a one-sided story," he 
said. 

Mrs. Oberndorf said 
that periiaps some of the 
issues should be in a court 
of law, but Rdl "has 
chosen the arena of publk 
oinnion." 

Ervin said that ReQ 
ought to be ghren his 
forum, but his remarks 
should be restricted to the 
committee report. 

Rdl attempted to ask 
whether any consideration 
would be given for his 
finandal situittion. He has 
beoi unonployed since his 
resignation. 

Standing cut him off 
saying, "We will listen to 
you for 10 minutes." 

When Standing ruled 
Rdl out of order, ReO 
replied, "Perhaps you are 
out of order. Sir!" 

Rdl durged that the 
rules of good safety were 
frequently ignored, that 
oigineeiing dedgns for the 
dectrical systems in cer- 
tain pumping stattons are 
being approved even with 
the kno\fde(^e that a 
sound altonative is sub- 
stantially cbta^pet in cost, 
and that the key maoage- 
meat positions in the De- 
partment of PuMic Utili- 
ties are, in many cases, 
filled by inex|Mrienced 
pecqde who are MjeAot 
contribute to bad manage- 
moit (tedsicms. 

Following reoimmra- 
daticms of the ttpott, Qty 
Manager Oeorge L. 
Hanbury reviewMl the 
operation of the UtiUty 
Department in wUdi he 
f^raDy su|qK»ted tiw 
i^Mes MtfT. Howevtfi he 
mUateda new praoedwe 
f<x t^ipctBi^ eoi^tint 
cngineBf. 



management and planning of inlet maintenance and 
beach nourishment where now the Er(»ion Commission 
operates at ahnmt a crisis level. 

Discussing the report at an informal session of City 
Council Monday, Councilman Rdd Ervin said that he 
agreed 100 percent with the recommendations. . 

He suggested, however, that the dty learn whether 
state and federal funds will still be available if changes 
are made. - 

City Manager George L. Hanbury said that that was 
why "we didn't recommend that the commission be 
dissolved." 

The report reviews conditions which made it 
necessary to hire a commo-dal dredge at Rudee Inlet 
from April II to May 6. The commission accepted the 
responsibility of undertaking all hydraulic dredging in 
Rudee Inlet and is funded primarily by the dty with 
supplementary funding from the state and federal 
govemmentt;^ 



The single oost-iaapfMrtuit futor which led to 4he 
delay or4he^overhaul, accordingi^o tivt-ttpoA^ was-tfie 
absence of a complete parts investor for the city's Rudee 
Inld dredge. A cost estimate for a complete inventory is 

sisjm. ; .. 



Conditioiial use permits granted 
for dune disturbing activities 



Conditional use permits 
for dune disturinng activi- 
ties yitn granted by Vir- 
ginia Beach City Coundl 
Momlay afternoon. 

In the actions, coundl 
concurred with recom- 
mendations of the Pbm- 
ning Commission. The 
permiu were opposed 1^ 
Robert J. Smith, president 
of the Chesapeake Beadi 
Civic League. 

Lynn Huffingham was 
granted a permit for a .148 



pared on the east side of 
Morton's Road, north of 
Ocean Yww Avenue, Bay- 
side Borou^. A pressed 
dwelling will be rdootted 
laiMlward of the primary 
dune (35 feet landward 
from the podtiim on the 
site plan submitted^. 

Seawall Enterprises, 
Inc., was granted a pomit 
on a 5,0004qiiare-foot 
pared (« tiw soutii side of 
Ocean View Avenue, east 
of Beaufort Avenue. 



Mental health specialist stays 



Virginia Beach City 
Coundl Mondi^ after- 
noon i4)im>priated $9,207 
to «mtinue the potion of 
mental health residential 
spedaiist. 

A request to continue 
the position with Com- 
prehensive Employment 
and Training A<^ f^uds 
for die period fnun Oct. 1 



through June 30, 1980 was 
daied because the annual 
salary is higher than that 
aOowed by CETA. 

The position has been 
filled since Mardi 1 and 
focuses on devdofMng a 
network of community / 
family hxmu to pro^de 
temporary shelter for 
mentally iU perstms. 



GARDENING 



fitmpage9 

a pttMem idMO taamoa 
and fir^laces are used 
<mae agsdn. A hmnfafifier 
is ideal. Yw on also sA 
pla^ in nnoefi witii 
peWes and w^er adted 
as aeoessary. Mbi^ witii 
a tpny bottk Is abo 
hdpftil. You wiU have to 
(k» aU of tMs to keq> 
fiiridcy fentthqiiqf. Otha 
|4antt UlM SwecUsh ivy. 
ji M o ioo^m , ^acana 
and many palms ven't 
imudy as ftuqr as Itngas 
th^ are pnqjaly wi^red. 
Sdie^^as ttc ^niflc in- 
ade. ^ mttdi for sipida 
flsAes. 



If you love yotu wgt- 
taUe gartkn as mudi as 
your Mter greemry and 
t^XHning slants, you can 
grow some avory herbs 
innde to sitip and add to 
«iitter soups and stews. 

As a matter of fact, 
with all of thb potting, 
watering, misting and 
blooaaing gnng <m. you 
may emi lose trade of tiM 
seasons. All of y^ur 
touse-btMud greomy wffl 
oortai^ KvoB up tte wfa- 
ta ««arks. S|»iBg 1^ tiie 
oittthm tarteuai aeasM 
win be hoe before yew 
kixmit. 



•^r^'^mmf^mmmmimii^ 



r 




2;S»KialNMiCM 



MiilMMMlMtarS^ 



13-HcipWanttd 



ftS^IMp WMnM 



22-9MB^ttaiHi 
•dMrPtts 



far Silt 



53-ForRMt»rSalt 



71-SwvicMOftand 



REDUCE SAfE * FAST 

with GoBese Tablets & 

E-Vap "water pills" Great 
Bridge Pharmacy. 



PONTUC ■ 12, 4 door, 
Catalina, excellent repair, 
fuUy equipped. $99S.^- 
1434. 



2TP9/19 6 



2CBD9/26 



WHY TAKE A CHANCE 

We can (uaraatee the sale 
of your home. Don't 
make the mistake of hav- 
ing two mortgage pay- 
ments, Call Jim Codirane 
at42(K3120.Higgins Real- 
ty Inc. 
2 4 CBD 10-10-79 

WANflb: your 

household extras » 
clothing, furniture and 
junk ~ by Friends School 
Thrift Store. All 
donations are tax 
deductible. Prompt, free 
pickup. Call 428-7841. 

2TF 
BATTLEFIELD Motwt - 
449 N. Battlefield Blvd. 
appredatet your bushiess 
for frkndly, courteous 
service and fair tonest 
prices — Viat us today or 
caU 347-7800. 

NON-COMISa(WED 
OFFKERS ASSOC is 

seeking ocMuudors for the 
Tidewater area. Call Mr.« 
Bamett at 499-6819. Re- 
tired military preferred. 
2 CDB-TF 



CHEVROUKT - 1977 
Window Sportt Van. Ex- 
celtent running condition, 
V-8, AM-FM. stereo Upe 
deck, carpeted, power 
brakes St steering, regular 
gas. 388-2736 
6 4 CBD 10-10-79 

MG • '73 Midgett. Blue, 

excelloit condition, 7,000 

mis. AM-FM, $3400, 467- 

0781. 

6 1 CBD 9-26-79 

NOVA - '76, standard 
shift, good condition, 
$2100. 420-0143. 

6 2CBD9/19 



T'Tmcks-TralMv-Jaapa 



tOSD' 1969 customized 
van, 6 cyl.. standard shift, 
new paint job with flames, 
new TriniHt motor, wagon 
wheeb ft new tires, AM- 
FM 8 track system, must 
sell, $1600. 487-3864. 
7 1CBD9-26-79 



S-AitoPMl>,tapair 



CALL ALTON- The best 
fund raisiag |»t>gnun yet. 
For housewives, schools, 
dubs, and organizations. 
No inveMmeat, 50 percent 
profit, 343-2766. 
2 4CBD10-^79 

BOOKKEEPING SES- 
VICEft AVAILABLE. 

Notary, foLState. at large, 
smUUw buiiqtUM .«i4n 
specialty, financial 
statonents. general ledgn. 
fed. and state, 
unemployment taxes, 
payroll, accountt payable 
and receiveable, bank 
sutemenu. 483-1041. 
2 4TCDB9/19 



KEYSTONE ELEC- 
TRONIC ENGINE 
ANALYZER $300. 
HANDY Clean parts 
Qemer $200. Please call 
499-4913 or 461-6640. 
8 4CDB9/18 

WE WILL BUY used and 
junk-HHiteBobiles. Call 



t Ittorcyclai ScMtan> 



WHYWALX??r When 
you can ride a MO-PED! 
SNARK~1979 - 130 mpg. 
Like newl $323. 481-1470 
9 4CDB9'26 



e-AirtMMfeHw far Sato 



lS4toipWaRtad 



Flat.. '78 Spyder Omvert- 
ible. like new. AM-FM 
cassette. $6200. 383-4209. 

6 1CBD9/19 

OODCE - 1978 Monaco. 4 
doof, sed.. 318 eoj^, 
cruise control, good mile- 
age, like new. 627-5388 

6 1CBD9/19 

DATSUN - 1974 B210. 
Autoouttic. 26 mta., im- 
maculate condition, 
$2400. 340-7770 

6 1CBD9/19 

torn SALE '75 C3ievy 
Van; Panded. carpeted. 
AM'¥Mi 8 track Stereo/4 
speaker, sink, Hide-A- 
Bed, V-8 Automiuic, out- 
side power ^ug: 7.000 
MLS on New ei^ne. 
$3,000. 835-3417. 
6 4 CBD 9^26-79 



Advertising 

Sales 

Communll) 

Newspapers 

We're growing, come 
grow with us! Newspaper 
advertising experiences 
helpfid but not necessary 
if you have a background 
in business or marketing 
~ career potential Full 
Time position - salary ~ 
commisnon ~ expenses 
or combination. Open- 
ings in Chesi4)eake or 
Virginia Beach - write or 
call in person (no phone 
calls please) Donald R. 
Frye, Gen. Mgr. Byerly 
PuUications, Publishers 
of the Virginia Beach Sun 
& the Chesapeake Post 
P.O. Box 1327 Chesa- 
peake, Va. 23320 

13/tf 



REPORTERS - General 
assignments, features, 
news editing with weekly 
newspapers in Southside 
and Tidewater Virginia. 
Prefer journalism school 
background and some 
experience. Must have 
good typing ability and 
be willing to learn news 
photography. If you are 
interested in more details, 
write David Woodruff, 
Byerly Publications, 1000 
Armory Drive, Franklin, 
Va. 23851. 
13 H-TF 

SALES HOLIDAY 
MAGIC COSMETICS- 

Opportunity to advance 

to management. Liberal 

commission, car helpful, 

tidewater area. Call 467- 

4040. No investment 

required. 

13 CDB-TF 

••••••••• 

-PBaSOM-TO-RBION* 

Tkmt's Ual -Toa an4 Taar 

U>CAL Nawaps^r 

HOUSEKEEPER, 1 day a 
week. Poplar Ridge area. 
Own transportation. Call 
after 6, 482-3709. 
13 2 CBD 9-26-79 



PUBLIC HEALTH 
OFFICER B (AN- 
NOUNCEMENT #492 - 
79) Include Class title and 
atmouncement number on 
Line 2, Position Applied 
For, ON STATE APPLI- 
CATION FORM. Quali- 
fied applicants are needed 
to add to employment 
list(s) used to fill present 
tod ^ture vaciqsdes In 
' Saluda, "Oiesapaaka or 



TELLER - Part time exp. 
only need apply. Chesa- 
peake Bank & Trust 547- 
S164. 
13 4CDB10-3 

PART-TIME cleaning 
job, needed 1 person to 
take on household chores 
once or twice a week. You 
must furnish your own 
transportation. 547-2019. 
13 4 CBD 10-10-79 

HELP WANTED 
PORTER - Must have 
experience in operating 
floor care machines. 
Excellent opportunity. 
Call executive 

housekeeper, 547-9111. 
EEOC 
13 4TCBD9/18 

WORK AT HOME IN 
SPARE TIME doing 
telephone survey work. 
No experience necessary. 
Students and housewives 
welcome. Call now collect 
for Mrs. BrashCT at (203) 

592-0183. 

5TCDB 9/19/79 

13 



14-PvsittoMWMM 



PERFECT PART-TIME 

job. Do you love jAaats & 
peoide? Must be 18 and 
have own transportation. 
CaU Qaire, (919) 435- 
2282. 

14 2CBD9/26 

BABYSITTING -- My 

home, age 2-5. 

Chesapeake, Norcova 

Estates. Weekly. CaU 547- 

8290. 

14 4TCDB9/19 



jl^^i^R^"* fPP^'W^ 



y 4biilfor<M V an Oia d Mtto ai'J n • 
from a recognized medical 
college, supplemented by 
one year of rotating in- 
ternship in an apiM-oved 
hospital and by the com- 
pletion of a program of 
studies leading to a 
master's degree in public 
health from a recognized 
school of public health, 3 
years of public health 
medical experience; 
Ucase or eligibility for 
such license, to practice 
medicine in this State. Six 
years of p(»t-doctoral ex- 
perience in public health, 
environmental health, 
hospital administration or 
medkal administradon, or 
Bond certification in ine- 
ventive medicine may be 
sulMtituted for the public 
health &gree and exper- 
ience requirements. For a 
(tetailed outline of duties 
ami responsiblilities visit 
your local VEC. Salary: 
$34,800 - $43,300. State 
a|q)iic^ons are available 
from local offices of VEC 
ft State agency personnd 
offfees ft must be recdved 
by 5K)0 p.m., Oc^ber 11, 
1979 at P.O. Box 1104. 
Ridunond. Va. 23208. 
Serving equal importunity 
employes. 



15 



IP 9/26 



FLEA MARKET for sale 
-Owners Finance! Lo- 
cated at 2642 CamposteOa 
Road, Chesapeake. Please 
caU 545-6944 or 545^9071 
15 4CDB9-26 

INVESTORS WANTED 

for Disco Dance Studio 
and Private After Hours 
Gub. For full information 
mail letter to 5337 
Talmyra Ct. Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 23462 
15 4CDB9/18 



SIAMESE - Redpoint 
males and females for fall 
shows. Bom in March, 
champion and grand 
champion paroits. Shots. 
Prices reasonable. Call 
587-1447 after 7 p.m. or 
weekends. 



ESTATE CLOSE out 

Garage Sale. 1010 Poin- 
dexter. S. Norfolk, Sept- 
ember 22, 9-5. Antique 
furniture, tools, wicker, 
1910 Bakers cabinet, 
porch swing, trunks, 
others. 



22 



4TH 10/10 28 



1CBD9/26 



COCK A TIELS 8 week 
Normals $35. Albianos 
$75. Male Splits $50. 
Hand fed Noemals $50. 
Please caU 488-6446. 
22 4 CDS 9/21 

EXTRA CASH 

It'i so easy. . .advertise the 
things you no longer need in the 
classified columns of your 
hometown newspaper. In 
practically no time at all, people 
in your neighborhood will know 
wtat you have to sell. You're on 
the road to extra cash. . . 
somebody wiU read your ad and 
buy! 

PUPS 627-2446. 2 weeks 

old, $150 registered. 

22 4CDB9-26 

IRISH SETTERS - 5 mo. 

male, also Mother & 
Father, purebred, 587- 
4371. 

22 2CBD9/19 

FREE KITTENS to ^a^ 

good home, six weeks old, 
one yellow male, 2 calico 
females. 547-2952. 



MAWET PLACE 

The classified section of your 
hometown newspaper is 
essentially the bulletin board and 
market place Qf Uw coonnuaity. 
It locates the interested customer 
as no other advertising can do. 
This is because the customers in 
your neighborhood turn to the 
classified pages and search out 
the advcrtiaeBMsit for what he or 
her wants to buy. 

PARIS STREET FLEA 
MARKET-Open Thurs.- 
Sun. 10-6. Come on in and 
.browse 'round! 8 different 
shops. 3450 Azalea 
Garden Rd. 857-0477. 

28/tf 



2»-Wairiadtoliiy 



WANTED ORIENTAL 
CARPETS-New or 01d~ 
Any condition, any age!!! 
461-3834 29/TF 



1972 CASTLE, 12x50, 2 
bedroom, all new furni- 
ture, $4500, 487-1527. 
40 4 CBD 10-3-79 

VIRGINL^N - 24 X 60, 3 
bedrooms. 2 full baths, 
living room, dining rooin, 
kitchen, family room, 
utility area, central air, 
skirting. Shed included. 
425-8509. 

4CDB9/19/79 
40 

DIXIE - 2 bedrooms, 
storm windows, porch. 
Can stay on lot! Excellent 
condition!! 461-4903 

4CDB9/19/79 
40 

INTERESTS EVERYONE 

The varied contents of your 
hometown newspaper give it a 
readership that includes every 
age group. 

MOBIU: HOME - Like 
new, 1974 Connor New- 
port 12 X 46, 2 bedrooms, 
mostly furnished, can stay 
on lot. Asking $4200, 
price negotible 487-2922 
after 6 p.m. 



FOUR ROOM HOUSE 

for rent, furnished, 2 lots 
in a nice trailer park and 
its quiet. 421-2823. 
53 2 CBD 9-26-79 



71S«rvlccsOfftred 



40 



4TCBD 10/10 



31-MMaiidStaiiVt 



45-*pa rt imn ti far Rant 



22 



2TBD9-26 



2S4rtictet for Sato 



NORVIEW- Rare coins - 
Norfolk's most complete. 
Buy, sell, trade. Buying 
silver coins. 42 Southon 
Shopping Center, Nor- 
folk, 853-8118. 
31 CBD-TF 



FOR SALE - Gibson Air- 
sweep, 24,000 B.T.U.'s air 
contUtioner, $100, Ken- 
more Dishwasher, $50, 
Gas power lawnmower, 
$15.42»-5861. 



LOVELY furnished 1-2 
bedroom apartment with 
color TV. Available, 
through May. Reasonably 
priced. Pacific West 
Apartments. Motel 306 
29th St. 428-3633. 

45/TFCDB 
45 



iSAjnmmt 



53-Far Rant ar Sato 



(i-.i try '^'yitfifi'^^ffft^fri 

OWN YOUR OWN 

HIGHLY PROFITABLE 
AND BEAUTIFUL Blue 
Jean Store and Fashion 
Shop. Mademoiselle 
Fashions offers this lui- 
que opportunity. &and 
names sudi as Lee, Levi, 
Wrangler. Faded Glory. 
M^ Landlubber, and 
over 30 other nationally- 
known toands and rdated 
sportswear. $15,500.00 
Grand Opening promo- 
tion. For information call 
214-634-2066 for Mr. 
Wilkerson. 



'kiTft4^m*i 



25 



2CBD9/26 



27-ltoM«iioM Goods 



AZALEA, PORSYTHIA. 
TBUGA.^^ $5.tXr per »"« ,? S? ^7 J 

dozttifl jMr'»l*cia»e^- --J^^' Decatur Street. 
-'Bagi:wdp«.«»>-3iiaU«*.b.4cMj«»^ no jnterior. 
ed. 423-2104. or write Basement workshop area. 
P.O. Box 9862. Wright 
Station, Granby St., Nor-- 
folk. 23505. 
35 4 CBD 10-3-79 



never before rented - walk 

to^ schools, 547-5101, 

9 to 5. 



3 PIECE RUST 
NAUGAHYDE living 
room set, suitable for 
professional office, 
almost new. Sacrifice 
price $800. 481-6544. 
27 



53 



4CBD 10/10 



PROTECT YOUR 
INVESTMENT - join the 

others in Tidewater who 
are having me profession- 
ally clean and Simonize 
their automobile. For ap- 
pointment call Bill, 486- 
1537. 

71 CBDJF 

WE PRINT newspaper, 
circulars, shopping 
guides, anything on news- 
print, with or without 
composition and camera 
services. We take orders • 
for small tabloid newspa- 
pers with press runs as 
low as 1,000 and we print 
for bigger publications 
with 50,000 and more cir- ^ 
culation. We've got lots 
of Tidewater area cus- - 
tomers because we're 
good, we're dependable 
and we're local. Please 
call Donald R. Frye, 547- 
^4571^ 'for infbrmation" 
and price quotations. 
You will be dealing with 
Byerly Publications, pub- 
lishers of the Chesapeake 
Post and the Virginia 
Beach Sun. 

71/tf 
BABYSITTING - My 
home in Brigadoon. 
Weekdays only. 467-4430. 
71 4CDB10-1 

GOOD LUCK cnmr 

NEY SWEEP SERVICE- 

Don't risk cHlmiMy fires! 
Licensed and insured pro- 
fessional methods - We 
won't leave you in the 
dust! 547-1226. 
^ 71 CBD-TF 



LIGHT HAULING - 

Gardening, hedge trim- 
ming, lawn mowing, reas- 
onable prices — call for 
estimate! 464-3634. 
71 CBD-TF 

AUTO CRUSHERS-A-1 • 
junk car removing. All 
cars towed away free, top 
dollar paid!!! Fast 
Service. 487-9222 71/TF 

BRAKES Compile brake 

job $59.95, front disc 

$29.95. Call 547-8529 

after6p.m- 

71 4TCDB9/19 

CAVALIER KITCHENS 

offers Overton unflnished 

cabinets. High quality. 

low prices. We offer 

planning and installation, 

or do it yoursdf! 857- 

1435. 

71 CBD-TF 

TOP PRICE PAID FOR 

junk cars - also late 

model salvage... Call 545- 

3517. 

71 CBD-TF 

BABYSnriNG in my 
home, any age. Hilltop 
area. 425-7107 



^Tj— 



4H 10/10 



•♦*♦ 

"P«B»OHTO-P«B80I|- 

Tkat'a D>l Tn aa* Tnr 

LOCAI. ■•«■»>*•' 

MR. ft MRS. PAINTERS 

of the Tidewater area. The 
quality of a man- the 
smooth touch of a 
woman. Interior-exterior 
painting. 424-4687. 

71/TF CDB 
71 

ROTO-TILLING Fall 
Special. 25^ off for gar- 
den or new lawn, any size, 
area. 48^2779 



40 9/26 



27 



IT CBD 9/ 18 



ALL TYPES, NEW AND 

used restaurant and bar 
equipment. Dixie 
Equipment Company. 
lOM Granby St. 623-7073 
38/TF 




What's Up Doc? 



4re you oponing a new 
praethe or ehan^g locaUont? Taka 
out an ad In tho POST/SUM and wall 
gat M« word out to all your itathnta 
and mayba avan aoma now ones. 

CAU 547-4571 



GEORGETOWN 
COLONY 

HOME SITES FOR SALE 
FOR 

People planning Homes 
ft Custom Builders 

SALES OFFICE 
333 Providence Rd. 

CAU 464-9317 



AUTO RCCYCLERS 
NOW BUYING 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR 
•Radtotan •FrooTowtog 

CHISAPIAKI 

lUIStodStrMt 487-S610 """^ 



13 



1CBD9/19 



DKTRIMITOISWP 
tIS.eOO.OO HI TUI 

MRTTMH 
tlO.ON.Ot HI VUI 

ruu TWi raTniTuiiii _. 

(itnor' AiRosoi nmt 

lUNtn GlUi* 
DURO SUPil GlUi N* 

MILUONSIIil 
AM KUK srair 

ammtomTiuyawJU 

TO MOMOn IMfllfMMCn 




HMD AMERICA'S 
NUMBER 1 NON-SELLER. 



Nokiorariotea^ 
bootoore! Not anil- , 
abto^anyprte! 
Tbo liMr Coowmw 
Uonaation CmIoqI 

It's tho free boc^M 
that h^ 09^200 
betpiudPe^al^d}- 
hcitioiH,' ffloro Bim 
hdifaae-Ontqaca 
UcehoBMr^Min. i 
Moiwjr mmagemeirt J 



■ M^titkm. Interna- 
KttMthatoiuklh^ 
lywi to a better way 
Id life. 

To^jroifffree 
a^jy.jtt^wnte. 




$nntms uiourPusimesisi 



We cannot afrord to do less than the best. We Vill print yoar 
ichool paper, rdwious or professional publications or 
Mwslellers. 

The POST and SLN have a skilled staff of printers, artists 
and graphic technicians to produce qualil> publicatioM. 

Our presses and tvpeselling ^nip^rol aw of Ihc highest 
qnalil% and our dedication for e^icellencc in reproduction is a 
tradition. For furllwr information and quotes please call 
547-^71. 



HANDY 

CLASSIFIED 

CLIPPER 




or want to soH? A POST or SUH 
daooHM ad is Mw boot way to rMcb Uw moot poo»lo In tiio 
region, ond at lowest cost, luot dip, fW out and moH tMo kandy 



' 4 weeks only S9«60 for 20 words In each btiw 

I ni..taurthwoei(isnHE} ®* **»• Chesapeake POST 

j ««-«««*«^''"«« and Vh^lnla Beach SUH. 
I 

j ClossHicotion: 



I YOUR NAME: 
I ADDRESS: _ 



I |ploaaohWm» 



D 



Mall lot tvii/Post 

P.O. Box IMf ____ 
Cliosa|io*ko, Va. t^Oi 

To ptet jmr erdM- ly fimm, cii #ttJ<JB 



iLj,JU^ 4 f -^ajg a 



wmm^wwm^pww^: 



MR* f.4! M,x.^.M-^^w.wJi.w,M,^i^hM.mMMmmmmmmmm 



mmm 



VIRGINIA BEACH SllNnWEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 19, 1979 14 



Beach, blind i 



Natioif unfand Fishing Day this Saturday and Sunday 



V 



B>£DLE>^IS 

^ itUltttm ttuh ■.nil <)«nliH>r. HrtKt 



ough the wind and rain of the past week has 
sd most of the rivers and lakes in the area, it 

This Saiurday and Sincr 22 and 2.1. > seem to have bothered the bass and speckled 
be National Hunting ancand a nuinbcilown on the Northwest River, 
sporting organizations e Virginia SlMc'son, of the NortkWesl River CampgroHiMls, 
Game Commission and llife Commissi <!»■< o" Saturday George Geddes and WaHcr 
will have displays on hae the occasion, of Virginia, went out on (he river and caught 
Portsmouth City Park. »,'and one of ikcm wdglied in al 4 lbs. 

Virginia State Game ^ers told me ISunday, Walt Worley again returned lo the 
some of the displays wilkes, boate, a test River and caught 10 bass and kept 8 of them. 
fry, a Britany Spaniels d a skect shoo^ Sunday, Roy Lewis and Greg Gogres, both of 
shool for the kids, a wihg dcmonslrati Beach, caught seven bass and one on this string 
and blue grass music. i in at four pounds. 

Also, to liven up the Ibe the nation! Ward, one of the regulars down at t-hc 
famous Flatland Cloggei get rolling aounds, caufht a nice creel of 15 speckled perch; 
day at 12 noon and finis* if you have >can, of Chesapeake, caught 20 crappie using 
time, bring the kids andPhe only thinjvs as bait. Charles and Joe Curran of 
will cost you is time. cake managed to snag a couple of nice bass on a 

Just in case you have fjinia State Gacd Rebel lure. One of ihe.se bass weighed in at 
Warden Sidney Akers wiig a hunter safunds. 

course on three consecuti's. September land Marshall, alto known aa tke "River Rat", is 
October 3. and October e will be heldtion. Rowland, wlio works at the Campgrounds, 
the Great Bridge Comm starting at 7ibly one of tiw beat freshwater fishermen in the 
p.m. each night. For morcall S47-6292. 

Both Virginia Beach alee incorporwould think he would take his vacation on some 
large farrns and wooded open to varidake fly rodding for bass, but not Rowland. He 
types of hunting. Althoui seem secludtwn to Nags Head and at last report was tearing 
there are still roads and h within the ranker and spot up. 1 wonder what the salt water 
of falling shot and even ?ry unlikely ttof "River Rat" would be, 
the falling shot will harmili makes peofeally anxious to hear the tales l],e will have to tell 
nervous when they hear it i gets back. 

Each year the Chesapetiia Beach PolLabor Day gone by nnd the holiday and tourist 
Departments receive hundaints on hunt«ver, many boaters are starting to winterfae their 
hunting too close to roadand a lot of Ay tip this week is don't do It. Some of the 
time these complaints couivoided if a lit best fishing is upon us. 
common sense and courtesplayed. nly are the fish still biting, but the weather is 

Always be sure you ar yards from ag more tolerable. This time of the year you 
highway or house and e>u should try ive to put up with the hot and humid weather 
shool in the opposite dire< dangerous thunder storms that frequent the 

Only courtesy, commoiDsc adherenceiy area during July, August and September. 
game and conversation Ire us a place heavy boat traffic will be tappering off as well 
hunt in the future. . „ nglinesattheboat ramps. 



Now Is the time to gel down to some scrionM fishing. 

In about a month and a half I will give you ilie tips on 
preparing your boat for the winter. 

On the fbhing scene things are sliU lookiiijg pretty 
good. On the Eastern Shore, anglers fishing the 
channels between the islands and the mainland are still 
catching plenty of spot, croaker and trout, although the 
flounder are not quite as plentiful as they were a couple 
of weeks ago. 

Surfcasters on the barrier islands are catching a few 
red drum (channel bass) as the drum start their fall 
migration towards the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. In 
a couple of weeks, as the weather cools off, this action 
should pick up. 

Flounder and trout catches have been dropping off in 
the lower bay around the bridge-tunnel but spot and 
croaker have been picking up the slack. Both pier and 
boat anglers have been having excellent Inck on croaker 
and spot when the weather permits them to flsh. 

Off-shore anglers are also having a battle with the 
weather. Northeast winds have made it difficult for 
boats to get out. Diane, down at the Virginia Beach 
Sports Fishing Center, told me that all the boats are 
booked up this weekend but only the head boats could 
get out Sunday. On Saiurday nearly all the boats stayed 
dockside. 

When the boats do get out the fishing Is excellent, as 
was denonstrated by the charter on the "Gaanet" 
today. They fished in the area of the Cigar nod P. 
Marks Jr., Charles E. Brown and S.T. Jones accounted 
for two while marlin (releases) and two citation waboo 
which weighed in at 34 lbs. S oz. and 3S Iba. 4 oa. These 
gentlemen came down from Franklin, Virginia and 
definitely got their money's worth of fishing. 

Diane also told me that the sea bass fishing on the 
offshore wrecks has been real good. There were severl 
citations caught but 1 was unalbc to obtain the anglers 



names Of the size of the fish . 

Down at Nags H^id the spot are biting. Milton 
Phelps at Tatem's Bait and Tackle Shop told me that 
their are plenty of spot in the surf and at the end of the 
piers. 

Down at Ramp 12 and 14 suft fishermen are catching 
plenty of grey trout, pompani, flounder and spot. The 
croakers are scattered. Milton told me thai the weather 
over the weekend was a llille rough but with Monday's 
moderate temiienitures and wind the action should be 
good by mldwcelc and the weekend. I am still waiting 
for the fall run on those big blues. 

If you plan on doing some rail hunting this week pray 
for a northeaster. If thai doesn't work, here is a high 
tide schedule. The table is computed for Sewells Point. 
To obtain approximate Eastern Shore seaside time (rail 
hunters) subtract 47 minutes. For Cape Hatteras 
subtract 1:58. 



Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wedne!i<lay 

Thursday 



Date 

21 
22 
23 

24 
25 
26 

27 



TiaM 




10:01 


22:16 


10:36 


22:51 


11:11 


23:26 


11:45 


00:00 


00:02 


12:22 


00:38 


I3m 


01:20 


13:50 



air 



Plaza Littl'ue wi:e championship F'sk survival 



The Hand 15 year old iza Little Leag9f seven tournament games including one no- 
captured the 1979 StLittle Leagtainst Naval Base; Eric Henry with a 3-1 record. 
Championship in Sterling, i a no-hitter against North Roanoke, Billy 

This team is made up olinest young btr pitched in four games and Mike Dodd and 
players in the Plaza - Gr The three hiiUier each pitched in one game, 
schools they attend are PiKellam and tktching position was held down ftrmly by Brian 
"nf w Green Rtin. t ^^^~ ' I With teftific t»cltup by Mark Hogge. "~~ " 

This team won nincMnet in thrmding defensive plays were made by Robbie 
tournaments to become tUa Beach Liffs, Mike Dodd, Rich Heine, David Wells, Greg 
League team ever to win anship.^is wUoyd Saner and Casey Hughes, 
also the first District 8 tearl 963. ffensive game was outstanding due to the hitting 

Plaza lost the final cation game I Ware batting .471, Jeff BriUhart with a .447, 
Westover Hills of North the Division les(.441)andBllIySchrieber(.417). 
southern regionals that wde them eUgiU tournament play there were two over-the- 
for World Series play. Tkry hard to talme runs achieved by Casey. Hughes and David 
considering Plaza beat Wo the first gar 
in round one. am was managed by Ben Brackins and coached 

The pitching staff for Pof David WaiWare. 

Pretrip inspecy Of f tch the weather 

Recem boating acci-o check a FfI^ VQU're bOdtillg 

dents indicate a need toinguisher whi 
reemphasize the import-n the dock, thi.yg ^^^^ ^ boater 
ance of inspecting youru're crawlii 
boat before going out onense smoke. 



the water. Many peoplewater. in 
use their boats monththe bay. 



tl 



long, you know 
ckly the weather 



A short phone call might 
save hours of anxiety, or 



conditions can 



If vou're new to 
after month, year aftene safe boat< g mUj q^ j^q 

year, and never feel <»n-itive force ^isn't a very good 

cemed about the condi-ifety, and y<|eani. 

tion of their boats or theirpread that id 

safety equipment. sing ptohlefi^ against drastic 

Check your boat forjns with fello *«« >« two 

smooth, dependable ope-Idp make tJ" «"» do. First, 

ration. jGuard againste Bay the $afc!>c ™ost recent 

tragedy bl^y updating your|>oating in tF^P^rt from the 

safety equipment. It's a Weather Service. 



even worse, a tragic death. 

Second, carry a radio 
on your boat, so you can 
hear the weather as it 
develops. Even a portable 
AM radio will receive 
weather reports periodi- 
cally. And pay attention 
to what they say. If small 
aaft warnings are issued, 
don't take a chance and 
stay just a little longer. 



One of the oddest forms 
of survival in nature 
occurs with an obscure 
fish found only in limited 
areas of Australia, Africa 
and South America. 

Hie lungfish, a true fish 
Jn fonn and function, can 
live during extreme 
drought by changiiig its 
method of oxygen intake 
from respiration through 
gills to breathing with a 
lung. 

Lungfish aren't the only 
fish that can adapt to 
drought. 

Some species closer to 
home which have similar 
traits are the American ed 
and many kinds of catfish. 

In Texas, catfish have 
been known to live buried 
in the mud of dry lakes for 
several months. 

The ability to live in 
severe climatic conditions 
is a developed trait among 
many diffoent kinds of 
afuatic animals. 

Frogs north of our 



southern must hibernate 
each winter imder cold 
water and ice, buried in 
mud so that they don't 
become too cold and 
freeze. 

Fortunately, a frog can 
slow its metabolk rate — 
the rate u ^^ it 
Imathcs, Its heart beats 
and its body functions 
operate— to only one-_^ 
tenth its normal rate dur- 
ing wann weather. 

In this manner, frogs 
are able to survive extreme 
cold. 

Land snails live a pre- 
carious existence during 
dry or cold weather. 

Snails must have mois- 
ture in order to hw. 

In a drought, they with- 
draw into their sbdl, seal 
off the openinip and wait 
for moisture. 

Surprisingly, they can 
live for years this way, 
with no known soiuce of. 
food or air. 



O F VI RG I N I A 



iSfiSf allNEW 

FUN-O-RAMA' 

r* CONTESTS •QAME8 'MVt 
• PERFORMING ARTS 

FREE Grandstatid wtti Racardbig Music Stan 

l« WEET — Mm Bandy Show — Tims., S«pt. 26 
I A WEET — Jo« Stampley Show — Wed., Sapl 26 
U WEN2 — Th« Oramatlct - rhura. SmL 27 



GREATEST LIVESTOCK SHOW IN THE EAST / 'SSnliE"*^ 

5,000 H«ad livestock— 1,000 Horses / SHOMIGASE 

45 Departments Livestock and /Arauid nw Wodd m 

Agriculture Events / 1} °5* - «•*»««>• 

■^ County &ary Day. 



SPCCIAL ATTRACTIONS /qffg£ 

• juMoaoLYMPicswMhBnooKanoaMapN 

aponwMdky tMWL (ndCrewn O) - M. SapL 28 

• FAMHV DAY AND QREAT PAPER pure CONTEST 
SpontonMy WRVA Radio - m. Sept. 2 1 

• XL-102DATENIQHT-'nHjra(tay.S^>t.20-BuyridawidCM*ridM(rM 
_ $1.02Conowt'S«wrBul»ttThaoiy"-8aiOP.M. — 

• 0-94 CONCERT NK3HT-Concwtw)dalrtdm for SG.0O 
T P.M. una MMnigtit. Sun., 3H)t. 23 

WEET AMATEUR BLl^GRASS RNALS-FREE-Mon., Sept. 24 



GREAT VIRGINIA BALLOON RACE— FREE 
Friday wtd Saturday. Sept. 2»-30. 

BUDWEISEH CLVDSOALES - FftEE - Sapt 20-26 



•k NEW Acts for 1979 — FREE Stebbing Royal European Cireus 



RACEWAY 

EVENTS -^^ 

JOIE CHITWOOO Thrill Siiow— Sept. 21-22-23 

JACK KOCHIMAN'S Htll Drlvars- 

Sapt. 28-29-30 

TRACTOR PULLING-AIIClas$es-S«pl. 22 



BRIGGS FRANKS OFFICIAL STATE FAIR 
HOTDOG & wrapptrs tor FREE admission. 



Win a Trip to Disney Worfcj for pictures 
at State Fair. Also 50 other prizes worth 
$2,500 in Fox Ptiolo Contest. 



^ 



^Sf 



DAILY 
ATniACTIONS 



• NITCHEU SHOKMOAT MAMWEnES 

• PICNEEK FMWSTEAO EXHIBITION 

• NWHTLy nieNwn extmvagmim 

• ANTWUE EMM MMNMiaiY SHOW 

• miMUl McSONALD'S MILES Of SMILES 
•yOUNGMcOOIMUI'SFAMil 

• RMESTMy (XNIBI OEMONSTMTIONS 
• /WIS t CMFTS MU rUWHI SHOW 



Super RMaa-ttoW aiwiw CONKLiPS MAOIC MOWAV 



MONEY WmUUXS 

The largest clams in thorid's smalle^^'^P ^ "^ 
world live in the Indo-mnec, a descctown newiiMiier seU 
Pacific Ocean, fromily 12 to 1 •»<> lonier.iieed and 
Tahiti to East Africa, and;. Its ears gro*~'- M"* «« and 
can grow to be four-and- of four inch 
a-half feet long, says the 

National Wildlife Federa- 

tion. 



WIDE CHOICE 

For a wide dxnoe of buycn, 
rentcn, worken in your 
ncichboriiood, use low con 
daisiried adt in your hometown 
newspaper. <kt lenilu quicid 



The panthothere, a cat- 
sized, furry, rodent-lilce 
creature, was the earliest 
true mammal on earth, 
appearing 1$0 million 
years ago, according to 
the National Wildlife 
Federation. Mammals 
Evolved from a group of 
primitive reptiles called 
pelycosaurs. 



Come to Haynes 

it's furniture country 




A baby tree frog only,,,. \ \ 
halfan inch long can jump-*" ■^ 
over five times its length 
straight up in the air. A 
full-size tree frog can 
jump even higher - over 20 
times its length. 




lAAPO 



ECIAUSTS 

Anii^als get tooth cavi- 
ties, buKfar less often than 
humans otl says Ranger 
Rick's NatutV-^^|4a|azine ^ ■■M^^VP^ 
for children. That's be- kii ■ WT 9 
cause food rarely sticks 
between their te«h, and IWS-A-iW'' 
because the foods they eat VIRdNIA^A. 
are better for their teeth i^^at OHiMlfflM 

than the food people eat. ^^^ 



1^ '% 



MARINE REPAIR 



FUUUNE SERVICE 



Vv, 



^<. 



ONLOMCKEN 




MARINE RAILMfAY 



WOOD, METAL A HBERGLASS 



2102 N. GREAT NECK ROAD 481-6909 



... home fashion's spoken here .. .speokii^ your land of 
language in a relaxed, friendly kind of way, frwn dining to 
sleeping . . .elegant to avant-garde . . . living room topofo . . 
hommpun io import . . . velvet to wicker at VALUES GALORE 

Whatever you need for 
your home, you'll find at 



4^ 



.^ COMPLETE UNE- PARTS 

■^ A ACCESSORIES 

DISCWNT PRICIS 

EAST COAST HmnmED 
AUTOMKTS 

MM.-Fri. $4 
Satiinlay9*5 
SmMhiylM 



•12 First CdoRial N. 4^7100 
MlSfiTMhySt S25-366S 




RICHMOND ** 




V 



Cape Henry L^t 



S3rd year. No. 39, Va. Beach, Va. 




The Official N#wspaper of Virginia Beacli 

Wednesrtiy. September 26, 1979 




One section — 15 cento 



Service Card program 
improves efficiency of 
Beach postal system 

The Postal Service's Consumer Service Card program 
tffers prompt response to custtmier maO problems, 
iccording to Postmaster J. T. Crosswhite Jr. 

"We've received more than 2S0 Consumer Service 
>uds since tlie program began in SejM^bCT 1975," the 
lostmaster said, "and we've beoi able to resolve more 
han 90 percent of complaints to the satisfMtion^of our 
ustomers. The program has made a significant 
ontribution to our efforts to improve the quality of 
fiail service to Virginia Beach area residents." 

The postmaster's |»-ogram is pirt of the Postd 
lervice's nationwide Consumer Service Program 
eflecting Postmaster General William F. Bolger's 
letermination that mail service should be courteous, 
fficient, and reliable. 

The cards are designed to help custom^s bring thdr 
roblems about mall service directly to postal 
lanagement so everythbig pMSible will be done to 
esolve them. Pc»tal employees are requhred to use the 
ards to record customer tdq)hone and correspondence 
iquiries and complaints. They are available from letter 
arriers and in post office lobbies. 

The Consumer Service Card ccmsists of two postal 
ards with carbon paper in between, (tee c(q>y is sent to 
ie local postmaster for action. The otho goes to the 
lonsumer Advocate at Postal Service Headquarters in 
l^ashington, D.C. • a high postal official charged with 
»ponsibility to cause necessary postal dianges to meet 
iistomer needs - for analysis to help spot problem areas 
nd trends, as weU at to assiA individual customns. No 
ostage is required on the cards. 

In reviewing cards sent to the Virginia Beach post 
ffice, Postmaster Crosswhite found that 75 percent of 
le complaints involved deliv^ extension. The cards 
lentified misdelivery as the next most frequent 
roblem. 

Postmaster Crosswhite said mA everyone used the 
ird to register a complaint. "Many ea$lcmm used a 
:onsumer S^vice Our4 to of fR sun^^OB* to improve 
lail service in the Yir^nii, Bmi<^ arta*, or to 

"We need to hear from pec^e what they ha^ mail 
roblems," he sakl, "to we can rescrive tton. Taking 
ic minute or two needed^ fiH <»e out it time i^ 
)ent for the customer and us." 




Beach photographer in 'Who^s Who* 



Virginia Beach photographer John A. Fahcy has been selected fof "Who's Who in Color SUdes • 1978" by the 
Photography Society of America as a itaalt of acccplaacc of lis sUdes in Juried intematioBal exhibitions. Twelve 
hundred photographers froni forty coaahflcs whope sUdcs were accepted in five or more tntcmadonal exhibits held 
throughout the world appen- In the sodety's te^, published hi the August issue of "PSA Journal." Fahey, an 
associate professor of RnasfaM hMgui^e and Utcratnre at (Nd Domfayon University resides In Virginia Beach with hb 
wife, Barbara, a watercolorlst, who recently won second place in the aaniial CoUege Park Square Art Show. "Pictured 
above Is his photo of an American egret. 



In Kempsvttle 



First Citizen of the Arte 
to be selected from 
over 30 nominations. 

The 1979 First Citizen of the Arts will be selected 
from over thirty nominations submitted by residents of 
Chesapeake, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Suffolk, and 
Virginia Beach. The winner will be announced at a gala 
celebration, co-sponsored by the Metropolitan Arts 
Congress and the Junior League of Norfolk- Virginia 
Beach, on Thursday, October 4, from 7-9 p.m. at the 
Monticello Arcade, Norfolk. The award will be 
presented bj^Mrs. Lynda Johnson Robb. 

The nominees are as follows: Fred Baycrsdorfcr, 
Wilbur Chadwick, Mr. and Mrs. Walter P. Chrysler Jr., 
Mrs. M inette Cooper, Francis Crociata, Harold Decker, 
Mrs. Sue Draper, E. Lynn Forehand. Ferrucio 
Oiannini, Mrs. Karen Gilbert, I. Sherman Greene, John 
Paul Hanbury, Mrs. Edythe Harrison, John M. 
Hodgson, Mrs. Shirley Jiral, Mrs. Edna Sarah Lazaron, 
Lawrence L. Mednick, Mrs. Frances Musick, Walter L. 
Noona Jr., the Portsmouth City Council, Dr. Georgia 
Ryder, Mrs. Doris L. Sahr, David Sanford, Mrs. Dora 
Short, Charles Sibley, Mrs. Ruth Salasky Siegel, 
William Tazewell, Mrs. lanthia V. Uzzle, the Virginia 
Beach Arts and Humanities Commission, and Norman 
C.Willcox. 

The award itself, designed and executed by Victor 
Pickett, a local sculptor of national renown, will be on 
display to be viewed by the public for one week in each 
of the five Tidewater cities. Afterwards, the sculpture 
will become the property of the 1979 Fu|t CitiMn of the 
Arts. ^* -^ ^ - 



Inside this week 

Arts and entertainment 4 

Church news 2 

Classified 11 

Commentary 3 



Proposed iimmm^M^moiher chance ^; 



Reconsideration of an 
ap{dicati<m for a oottdt> 
tional use permit for a 



car wash in Kcmpsville 
Monday afternoon re- 
sulted in a tk vote whidi 



rCC dean appointed to national position 



Dr. E. T. "Joe" 
uchanan, Dean of Stu- 
;nt Services at the Vir- 
nia Beach can^nis of 
idewater Community 
oilege. has been ap- 
}inted attorney for the 
overnmental Relations 
id Legislation Division, 
atiomd Association of 



^udent Personnel Ad- 
mhiistrators. 

The association 
(NASPA) is made up of 
S.OOO chief student per- 
sonnd officers in 1600 
colleges and universities in 
the United States. 

In his capacity as attor- 
ney for the Governmental 



Relations Division, Dr.. 
Buchanan wUl be respons- 
ible for reviewing legisla- 
tive proposals, preparing 
analyses of federal laws 
affecting college admfads- 
trators, and developing, in 
conjunction with the 
American Council on 
Education, materials de- 



fining operatfaig standards 
for colleges and universi- 
ties. 

In 1976, Dr. ^Khanan 
was selected as the Out- 
standing New Profes- 
sional in the Southeast 
United States by the 
National Association. 



leach man named exelrutive director 
>f Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel 




William E. Anderson has been appointed executive 
director of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel, it was 
announced re(xntly by Lucius J. KeUam, chairman of 
the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel Commission. 
Anderson succeeds J. Clyde Morris, who served as 
executive director for more than 16 ^ars until his 
retirement on August 31. 

Connecting the Delmarva Peninsula with the Viqinia 
Beach-Norfolk area, the Chesq;>eake Bay Bridge- 
Tunnel is considered the largest bridge-tunnel complex 
in the world. 

Anderson, who has been operations manager smce 
1973, has been associated with the project for 17 yeus. 
He started as field engiiMcr during the bridge-tunad's 
construction, from 1962 to 1964. He was superintendent 
of maintenance from 1964 to 1973. 

The new exKutive director was in the U.S. Army 
Corps of EnginMn from 1941 to 1962, attainii^ the 
rank of Lieutenant Colonel. After graduation from the 
Corps' Officer Candidate School, Ft. Bdvw, Va.. he 
served in the European llieata, the Philif^Miws, 
Marshall Islands, Alaska, Japan, Korea and Greenlud, 
where he was responsible for the building of airfidds. 
roads and bridgn. He also dvected the building of the 
first phase of the Dew Um stations in GreenlaiMl in 
I960. 

Major highway traffic 
continues to decUne 

l^affk on Viqinta's nu^or highways <»ntinued to 
dadfaie In Ai^ust, ^t^ng4.2 pa- cent below the levd 
for the same month la« year. 

It was the third conse^ti^ month that trafflce 
volumes had fidlen below 1978 levds as a result of the 
gasoline shortage, increased fuel prices, and 
consolation effwts. 



aUows the applicant 
reapply at any time.'^ 

On Ai^. 13. City Coun- 
cil voted 6-S a^tinst the 
appdcation of National 
Pride Equifment, Inc. for 
a ponit for a car wash on 
a .617 acre parcel on the 
east side of South Witch- 
duck Road, south of 
Brady Court, Kempsville 
Borough. 

The Planning Commis- 
sion recommended denial 
because the proposed use 
was inappropriate for the 
site. 

The nutter was recon- 
sidered on the motion of 
Councilman R. L. Riggs 
because he received re- 
ports that some of the 
peoide in opposition did 
not live in the area. 

The car wash would 
have been placed in the 
middle of a comer parcel, 
rather than on the comer, 
Arthur Bowman, owner 
of tihe property said be- 
cause he (fid not have 
acccu on the comer. 

Tom Mannix, who 
operates a car wash across 
the street, said he was 
conoermd about ingress 
aiMl egress on Whchduck 
Road and with having a 
third car wa^ at thtitf 
intersection. 

Bownum said that he 



had a half million dollars 
ted in Kempsville and 
that Mannix was his com- 
petition. "If he can't 
stand the heat, let him get 
out of the kitchen," he 
said. 

Also speaking in oppo- 
sition were Terry John- 
son, T. C. Bobbitt, NelUe 
Health, Pat Mannix and 
James W. Heath, who 
cited the excessive traffic 
at the intersection and the 
undesireability of a car 
wash at the site. 

Vice Mayor J. Henry 
McCoy Jr. said that he 
"can't imagine building a 
car wash with no traffic," 
and that "access for the 
proposed car wash was 
better than for the one 
across the street." He said 
the believed in the free 
enterprise system and 
competition and recom- 
mended approval. 

Coundlman George R. 
Ferrdl, noting that the 
comer is the oldest com- 
mercial comer in Kemps- 
ville and should not sit idle 
for dght, nine or ten 
years, seconded the 
motion. 

Coundhnan Rdd Ervin 
said that if Mannix' appli- 
cation were before him, 
"I'd vote against his." He 
See CAR WASH, page 3 



Consumer interests .5 

• • • • • •••■#•*• •<• ••••••••••••• ■•■••* 

Legal notices 8-10 

Real estate 6 

Outdoor sports 12 



Public hearing set 
on utilities connection 
fees and policies 



Senator Peter K. 
Babalas of Norfolk, chair- 
man of the Senate Subcom- 
mittee Studying Utilities 
Connection Fees, Charges 
and Policies announces 
that the subcommittee will 
hold a public hearing on 
Thursday evening, Octo- 
ber 4, at 8 p.m. in the 
auditorium of Kempsville 
High School, 574 Kemps- 
ville Road, Virginia 
Beach. 

The subcommittee 
wishes to obtain testimony 
from all parties interested. 

Members of the sub- 
committe serving with 
Senator Babalas are: Sen- 
ate members from the 
Senate Committee on 
Local Government: Sena- 
tor Virgil H. Goode Jr., of 
Franklin: Senator A. Joe 
Canada Jr., of Virginia 
Beach; and House of 



Delegates members from 
the House Committee on 
Counties, Cities and 
Towns: Delegate Claude 
W. ^derson of Bucking- 
hami^legate George W. 
Jones of Chesterfield; and 
John S. Barr, citizen 
monber. 

Those persons wishing 
to speak should reserve 
time two days in advance 
of the hearing. This may 
be done by contacting C. 
M. Conner Jr., Division 
of Legislative Services, P. 
O. Box 3-AG, Richmond, 
Virginia, 232(M, or by 
calling (804) 786-3591. At 
least one written copy of 
any remarks is requested. 

For additional informa- 
tion contact Robert F. 
Doutt, Senate Deputy 
Clerk, P. O. Box 396. 
Richmond, Virginia, 
23203, (804) 786-4638. 



UPS to build new distribution center at Beach 



COVA Corporation, a Virginia real estate 
corporation wholly owned by United Parcel Service, 
Iitc.. last week purchased approximately 10 acres in the 
Airport Industrial Park in Virginia Beach for 
coi^ruction of a new UPS Parnl Distribution Center. 
UPS wUl lease the lai^ and facility frcMn iu subsidiary. 

CX)VA iwrchased the 9.9S2 acres of S273,6M from 
the Virginia Beach DevdoiHn«)t Authority. Local 
assiMuice in the transw^n was provicted by the roUty 
firm of Adams. McCabe ft Lester. 

Through COVA, UPS wiU build a 66,000 ^. ft. 
distribution (xnter on the new site at a total cost of S2.S 
million. The new center will replace the company's 
30.000 sq. ft. leased Norfolk facility, which has been in 
uscfor 12y«irs. 

The new center will continue to serve the »>uth 



Hampton Roads area, and the new site will idlow 
expansion of the facility. 

Construction of the center is expected to begin Itte 
this fall, and completion is scheduled for a year Uxm. 
When operational, the facility will employ 185 iwo^, 
an incroue of 50 over the Ncvfotk centN-'s wwk force. 
Employment is expected to grow to 245 witha flw 
ymrs. 

UPS officials said the new facihty is needed beeuae 
volume has exceednl the Norfolk center's oqjichy. 
They dted increased local industrial ^owth Mid the 
general growth of the area as reasons for the move. 

UPS is a national parcel distribution tervice 
company. The com|»ny was assisted in its "tTwinftion 
by Jamm T. I^vis III of the InduMrU nMfon. 
Virginia Beach Department of Economk Dev^^n^it. 



mmmm 



Ij 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER M, 1919 2 



Virginia Beach 
tiappenings 

Tidewater Silver Sails hold 
fall pot luck Ittncheon 

A special fall pot luck luncheon will b« held at 
the home of Noma Brice (Lcdr. USN Ret.) for 
members of Tidewater Silver Salts on Saturday, 
September 29, beginning at 1 p.m. 

Former members of WAVES, retired or active 
servicewomen, may become charter members by 
contacting Helen Connolly at 4464 Savoy Court, 
VB 23455, and sending a check for $3 for annual 
dues. 

For informaiton and to make reservations for 
the Saturday luncheon, contact Sharon Ramp at 
251 East McGinnis Circle, Norfolk, 23502. 

The Brice home is at 7001 Doumar Drive, 
Norfolk. 

Comprehensive Mental Health 
Services needs volunteers 

Comprehensive Mental ^Health Services, an 
agency of the city of Virginia Beach, is looking for 
volunteers to fill a variety of positions. 

Particularly needed are clerical volunteers for 
CMHS's Wildwood Drive office off First Colonial 
Road and volunteers willing to work with young 
mothers and their children in the Bayside, 
Oceanfront and Courthouse sections of the city. 

Most positions require one half of service each 
week. 

For further information, call JoAnn Clegg, 
Volunteer Services Coordinator at 490-0583 . 



Beach Jaycees plan pork fest 

The Virginia Beach Jaycees will sponsor the 
First Annual Jaycee Pork Fest on October 3 at the 
Jungle Falls on General Booth Boulevard. This 
event is an excellent opportunity for area 
businessmen to get acquainted with each other and 
the Jaycees. The menu is pit cooked barbecue (on 
site), baked beans, sweet potato rolls, cole slaw, 
and hush puppies. Hospitality booths will be 
available. If you or your company is interested in 
purchasing tickets, call Gary Mersdn or Bruce 
McKenna. 



Arthritis foundation sponsors classes 

The Tidewater Branch Arthritis Foundation is 
beginning a series of patient education classes on 
Tuesday, October 2. The classes are designed 
to help the patient better understand the disease. 
The first class will focus on the major forms of 
arthritis and treatments available. Space is 
limited. Call the Arthritis Foundation at 587-2887 
for more information. 



Tabernacle pbtns 3rd annual fall fair 

Pennsylvania Dutch Funnel cakes will be 
cooked and served hot at the 3rd annual fall fair 
Saturday, October 6 at Tabernacle United 
Methodist Church, 1265 Sandbridge Road. Hours 
for the fair will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The 
country store will offer food and beverage, as well 
as the country store. 

Several new booths have been added this year, 
including down by the seashore, make-up and 
photography and chalk sketches by a local artist. 
At 11 a.m. the Maverick Square dancers will 
perform, with Sid Arnold as caller. 

Other booths offering items for sale will be attic 
treasures, book nook, crafts, Christmas corner, 
the green thumb, not so new, toy center and the 
while elephant. 

For the children there will be pony rides, games 
with prizes, and a magic show at 1 p.m. by a well- 
known local magician. There will also be a variety 
of demonstrations and exhibits. 

The raindate for the fair will be Oct. 13. 
Anyone wishing more information may call Mrs. 
James T. Morris, chairman at 426-7191. The 
paster of the church is Rev. David Tanner. 



Veterans empioynient seminar planned 

A Veterans employment seminar will be held 
October 4 at Kirn Memorial Library, Norfolk, at 
9:30 a.m. and will include a film on interviewing 
and speakers from local businesses. The seminaris 
free and will discuss resumes, applications, 
personal interviews, and the overall job picture. 



Bloodmobile at General Hospital 

The Red Cross Bloodmobile will take donations 
on Wednesday, October 3, from 1-7 p.m. at 
General Hospital of Virginia Beach. 

PA sof^homores sponsor flea market 

The sophomore class of Princess Anne High 
School will sponsor a flea market as a fund raising 
activity on Sept. 29 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the 
high school parking lot. lUnial fee is $5 per space. 
Contact the school at 4W-126I between 9 a.ro. 
ind 3 p.m. for more infomwition. 



Doing your own thing may hurt others 



By REV. W. LEE TRUMAN 



Many of the people you meet each day in Virginia 
Beach will be perscms who are irresponsible and also 
undisciplined and consistently unhappy. 

These persons are those who cannot or have never 
learned to put their own pleasures second. The result is 
they get into trouble solely because they do as tfiey 
please. They act without regard for the painful 
consequences or the hurt which could come to others, or 
to themselves. 

In counseling, I find they are irregular in their habits 
of eating, sleeping and working. They cannot establish a 
consistent or a healthy life pattern. 

John's life was coming apart for just these reasons. In 
talking to his mother, she told me her son as a boy 
would often decide to take a bath or get a haircut just as 
the family was sitting down to dinner. She went on and 
illustrated this attribute of being undisciplined again 
and again in his life, and also how unhanv he has 
always seemed to be. 

John, 39, can visit a bar, meet a friend or some 
interesting story teller and he will stay until the place 
closes, completely disregarding his wife who is frantic 
with anxiety wondering what has happened to her 
husband. He is always sorry, feels guilty, but keeps on 
doing the same thing many different ways. 

This is a man who is very unhappy and making 
everyone close to him miseimble. He is living a broken, 
fragmented life because of his basic lack of discipline. 
This kind of behavior is like that of a child. The spirit of 
rebellion, refusal to conform to the nuuiy disciplines of 
school, home, church, living for the moment — always 
living in a fragmented pattern and is always out of step. 

John went into his adulthood refusing to conform. 
His "child" as Eric Berne has pointed out, u almost 
totally in control. In this attitude style, he has contempt 
for anyone who settles down in one place and lives an 
ordinarily disciplined life with norms that others can 
expect of him. The undisciplined person looks upon the 




Let's 
talk 



disdpUned without any cdmprelmision of the other, 
feeling he is sensibly Uviog a full Ufe. and having aU the 
fun. and thereftm feels a disci|tfaed pawn is to be 
pitied. 

John fails to realize that his sprees, nervious 
breakdowns and other illnesses, indading his aborted 
business ventures, hv^ cost his responsible relatives a 
great deal of anxiety and luiuual quantities of money. 
He also fails to note that when he is sick, broke, or in 
debt he fells back on the disciplined for help, money or 
security. 

The free-spirited "black sheq>" forgets when he is 
up, how often he has been unhappy and also how often 
he has resisted ef foru of his family and friends to help 
him find a hapinn and more successful way of life. 
John prefers to remain an outside', a parson above the 
rules. 

All of this is a part of the cost of civilization. There 
was a time when the undisciplined man could become 
successful and even famous dping the individualistic 
uid danierous work of pioneerfatg. Such persons are 
oftoi decidedly gifted. S(Miie of otu* most creative 
writoi are of this type. 

Adventuresome men such as Lawrenw of Arabia use 
these distinct talents «nd eccentricities and leave their 
marks on history. But most often, it is the frustration 
which lads them to the tragic. Such is the cost for a 
person who walks always out of stq) and yet lives in a 
world that does ntM hear the drum beat they follow. 



Christian drama teaap iqipeiHrf 
at Tabernacle Baptist School 

The Academy of ^ts Christian Players will 
appear at Tabernacle Baptist School on SqMember 
29 at 7:30 p.m. in a unique presmtation of the 
Gospel through drama. The Greenville-based 
drama team is touring the eastern United States. 

The team will present a Christian drama the 
evening of the 29th. "God Meant It For Good" is 
set in the palatial splendor of ancient Enrpt and 
depicts how Joseph was ruthlessly sold by his 
brothers into salvery and then rose from 
Pharoah's prison to Pharoah's palace. The play 
employs full biblical and Egyptian contume, full 
scmery, professional stage lighting and stage 
make-up. * 

The Academy of Arts Christian Players is one 
of the first teams in the eastern United Statn. 
Their success has sparked a great deal of interest 
among churches and colleges in the drama team 
concept. Admission is $2 for adults and $1.30 for 
students from the first grade up. 



Kennedy 
promoted- 
at hospital 

Nancy Kennedy, R. N., 
M.S.N., was promoted to 
the position of assistant 
director for staff develop- 
ment at General Hospital 
of Virginia Beach re- 
cently. Mrs. Kennedy re- 
ceived her B.S.N. at Duke 
University and her M.S.N^ 
from the JJniy^ty ^of 
Rhade4slan|d. Shehas had 
past experience in staff 
development and as a 
clinic^ a>ordiHator. Her 
most recent experience has 
been as nursing coordina- 
tor for orientation and 
education at General 
Hospital of Virginia 
Beach. 



Virginia Beach births 



Mr. and Mrs. Jom|^ Lee Suich, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Stockton Garretson, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Loftin W. McLamb Jr., son; 

Mr. and Mn. David Rodney Dyson, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Tajan, son; 

Mr. and Mrs. Stan F. Meyer Jr., son; 

Mr. and Mrs. David E. Snider Jr., son; 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Stacy Harmon, son; 

Mr. udMrsv Mark Thmnas Doten, son; - 

Mr. and Mn. Hennvn A. Hall WtJon; ^ 

,Mr. and Mrs«Gerald J. LagemJiPsbn;* 

Mr. uid Mrs. Richard Hope CulQpepper, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Woody Edward Hicks, daughter; 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rivers Jones Jr. , son; 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Bryan Litchfield, son. 



Delano 
appointed 



Sons of Union Veterans 
elect Beach men as officers 

At the regular meeting of Sons of Union Veterans 
held on September IS, three men from Virginia Beach 
were elected as officers. They are chairman, Arthur A. 
Kent of West Colonial Parkway; vice chairman, Duane 
B. Baldwin Sr. of Cumberland Pvkway; and chaplain, 
John B. Davis of Ainsley Place. Lake Edward West. 

The group voted to have a uniformed color guard in 
the Veterans Day Parade on November 12 in Norfolk. 

The next meeting will be held on Sunday, Octoba- 28, 
at 3 p.m. in the offices of the Monitor Research and 
Recovery Foundation. Old Royster Building Suite 320. 
at Granby St. and City Hall Ave., Norfolk. For more 
information call Duane B. Baldwin Sr. 486-6316. 



SmEIITC 

Tou'rt Mife to Id a bite if you 
drop a line in the dmined 
coliuniu of your community 



■wwtiiaiMr. Your danified ad is 
part of the hooMtown newt Uut 
evenrbody waitti to read ai well 
as the news of ti» oommuflity . 



Ms. Barbara J. Delano 
has becsi appointed to the 
position of assistant per- 
soimel director of General 
Hospital of Virginia 
Beach. Ms. Delano re- 
ceived a Bachelor of Arts 
Degree in Sociology from 
Old I^uninion University. 

^She abo attended the uni-^ 
versi^'^ jr|du|te sdiool 
in lirtMui stu^. Ms. 

. Delana iecved., as ji ..jx- 
search specialist with 

4»dutheastertt Tidewater 
Of>portiuiities Industriali- 
zation Center. Inc. in 
Norfolk and has hcea its 
pmonnel director for the 
past year. 



ON TEUVISION WEEKLY!!! 

THE ROCK CNimCH 
OF VA. BEACH 

EVERY 

SATURDAY EVENWfi 

10:00 P.M. ON CBN 

CHANNEL 27 

• GUEST SraWEIS 

Tht Rwh Omtk it^laoM at'MG timm^ltt M^ 
VirgMa laach with Sindqi Sarvieas IMa^ak ft 10:30 
a.n. Md EvtiAig SarvkM 7:30 pjik 

WwdhntdayBwvkn 10:30 a.m. A 7:30 p.m. 

THREE HOT UNES: 467-«i02, 4S7-0S03, 

407-43S7 





Bayside Motors 

4747 SiMra Drive 464-4SU 
CiiariesC.llal«.Sr. and Staff 

HayiMs^urniture Company 

5324 Virciaia Baach Boulevard 
FamHiira-iaddiRg-Carpetiiv 

Rosowood Momorial Park 

631 WitcMack Road 497-0925 
CCKMiMlricfc 

Engineoriiig Moilia, Inc. 

600 1. Ukarty strait 
Charlas NackwarHi and Staff 



Charlit's Seafood Restaurant 

3139 SharvDrhi 401-9063 
Mary L iaiipali and Eiaplayati 

Kellam-Eaton Insurance Co. 

3111 Nelfic AvMMM 428-9161 

Overton's NIarket 

1419 Paindtxttr Strttt 545-9496 
Tlia Ovartaas md f ■playias ' 

MiH-End^rpotShop 

4740 VbgiriB Baach BM. 497-4054 

Tajriar B. Carraad Ea^ilayMi 

Fumituro Showrooms 

S20E.LIttlaCrMka»ai 
3MI S. MRlUNy Ml^nray 

Andy's Ptumlihig and Noating 

1003 Canal 0Hva4U-S000 

State Ra^ilarai Naw and OM Narii 



KMVtvHhniMMacy 



Indian Translation 
of Psalm 23 



TiM QrMt Wiilte fwKtm aNvv* Is a slitplMnl 
ehlal. I am HIS| ww wNIl Mm I wml not. H* 
Uirmra out to nw a ra^ aMiIlM mnM of tiM rop» 
la i«v«, Mid Ito drMva m* to wAmn Um grata la 
ym and Uia wator — t Oa wg i raMi, awll aat Mid 
■t down aaUtliad. SanialiMaa my hoart la vary 
woah and laHa down, but No Ifto K up again and 
drawa mo IMa a good roM. Mto namo la 
Wondarfid. 

Somattmo . . R m^ bo vary aoon; R moy bo 
longor; tt may bo a lanf Umo No wll *aw mo bito 
a ^aoo Botwoon Uio moHMOlRa. H la daifi Inafo, 
biR I'U bo afraid not, for R la Uwro botwoon Um 
mountolna Uiat ttia Sbapliard Cldof wW moot mo, 
and Uio himgor I liava lofl In my Iwart oN Uiraiigh 




Willis Furniture at NINtop 



1712 laaUa Read 42fr^S0Sl 

LJi. Oans aaa Staff 



. Somalbnoa Iw makoa Urn rava ropo into wiilp, 
tort aftorwarda Na givaa am a atoff to loan on. Ho 
aproada a liMo boforo mo wNbaM kbida irffood. 
Ho puto NIa hand apon mif hoad and aN Uw 



t*tlmmMtt 



Ufbat I ton yon la Iraa, I la pot, ttiasa roada 
Uiat art "away abaaT' wM atoy wRb mo through 
Uda Mto, and af t ot w a rd a I wW go to Bvo to Umbto 
topoo and aR down wNh Uio t ha ph a nl CMaf 
ferovor. 




Price's Incorporated 

4500 Pwi*raha MaB 407-4021 

Home Federal Savings 
and Uan ASSN. 

IfilB LaiMn Boa< 4M OUT 
300*A Narlb BaUlafiaia mnL 

Todd Electric Compaiqf 
Preston's Pharmacy 

1401 NMaitar Sfratt S45-7337 



Chesapeake Savhigs and Loan 

Southern States 
Chesapeake Assn., hic. 

1764 S. MBNaiy Midway 420^1041 



J.D. INNesand Sons, Inc. 
Ki^^n Md Eaten hic 

Bl^ iiBM fc — iHaa 
HMiilHim illl|l|lil^ 

Maaam Aana Stotfaa 427-3390 



W.Im tUKf ^mOUOS 

ll^w taaiM iwaaai^ MMapaahf 
42B«0B^«4^ 

Nome FMleral Smii«B airf Umi Amk 



^MMii 



■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^■■i 



w^^f9mmmmm^mmmmm9999m9mmm'rmnmmm 






! 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN D WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 26. 1979 3 



(t,i 



ViigiiiiaBeach^ 



■^ 



Commentary 



Letters 

Public opinion invited on 
Virginia Beacli Expressway 

Editor, Vir^ia Beach Sun: 

The Norfolk-Vii^ia Beach Expressway Study 
Commission, that I have the honor to chair, will hold a 
public hearing on Wednesday, September 26, at 7:30 
p.m., in the Virginia Beach City Council Chwnbers. 
The public is invited to attend to submit suggestions as 
to ways the operations of the expressway and the road 
itself may be improved. Suggestions are solicited 
regarding roadway widming that may be needed, 
additional ramps that may be desired, and any 
re-designing of existing ramps that may be necessary. 
Also, ideas are solicited as to means by which traffic 
flow may be im|H-oved, especially at the main toll plaza 
between Rosemont Road and Indq)endence Boulevard. 
Citizens experiencing difficulty with the toll recepticles 
or otherwise are encouraged to present their problems. 

At the hearing, the City of Virginia Beach will be 
expected to submit its recommendations as to additional 
ramps and ramp modifications the city feds are needed. 
The State Departmoit of Highways and Transportaition 
will submit a summary concerning its present opera- 
tions. The Office of the Virginia Attorney General will 
appear to explain its compliance or the lack of it, with 
the Commission's directive to provide an overview 
procedure to assure the investment of expressway 
revenue so as to generate the highest possible amount of 
interest income from expressway revenue deposits. 

When the expressway was completed, it was 
contemjdated that the fadlity would not be toll free 
until the year of 2003. The Norfolk-Virginia Beach 
Expressway Study Commission hopes that the tolls may 
be abolished by 198S, twenty years earlier than 
anticipated. Also, the commission is urging that the 
expressway by induded in the Interstate 64 system, 
which begins at St. Louis, Missouri, at the earliest 
possible date, in order that 1-64 may extend to the 
Atlantic Ocean, toU free. 

Under tiii sponsorship of Senator Joseph T, 
Fitzpatridr State Senator from Norfolk and Vii^nia 
Beac^jipid iq>on the recommendation of the Norfolk- 
ViigWik Beai^ Expressway Study Commission, the 
commuter rate was instituted on July 1 , 1978. Since that 
gme, coounut^ pw^:)iiimftttie books of tickets have 

per tnp. Senators, Fitzpatridc, Peter K. Babalas and A. 
Joe Canada Jr. and Delegates William T. Par^ and- 
Robert E. Washington join me in announcing the 
fcdlowing new additional outlets for the salcijo^ the. 
books of commuter tickets, as follows: 

first ft MerdMBts Natfooal Baak 

Virpnia Beach Branch, Laskin Road and Pacific 
Avenue, Virginia Beach; 

London Bridge Branch, 345 Great Neck Road, 
Virginia Beach; 

Princess Anne Plaza Branch, 3333 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach; 

KempsviUe Branch, 405 South Witchduck Road, 
Virginia Beach; 

Oceana Branch, Oceana Naval Au* Station, Virginia 
Beach; 

Bank Street Branch, One Bank Street, Norfolk. 

RiitVUiiJtoiluk of Tidewater 

Great hfeck Road, 1344 Great Neck Road. Virginia 
Beach; 

Green Run, 3336 Holland Road, Virginia Beach; 

KempsWlle, 5289 E. Princess Anne Rbad. Virginia 
Beach; 

Little Necl^oad,, 3U2 Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
Virginia Beacm 

Pembrdce, 351 Independence Boulevard, Virginia 
BeKh; 

Rosemont Road, 225 South Rosemont Road, Virginia 
Beach. 

Cttiicns IVut Brak of Viigiiila Beach 

Intersection of Newtown Road & Toll Road, 
Norfolk. 

Vttkbi^ltock Bank of CoBmercc 

3450 Pacific AVoiue, Virginia Beach. 

Viflfaria Natkmal Bank 

Ch-eat Neck Square Branch. Locked in Farm Fresh 
Supermarket, Virginia Beach. 

I vnll look forward to SMing you at the public hearing 
concerning the Norfolk- Vii^inia Brach Expressway on 
Wednesday, September 26, at 7:30 p.m., in the Virginia 
BeKh City CouncU Chamb^s.. 

Gloin B. McClanan 
Virginia House of Del^ates 
\%ginia Beach 



SUN Deadlines 



Newf dsadlhir for tkc VIltGINU BEACH SUN k 

5 p.a. Fitter for tlM f oHtfwtai WciMsiay*s edMM. 

Arlklti woM ke N^Mtt tftw^iwKs QrpcwrlUMt 



fet dHMrp, dnr aad acwwpa^N ^ 
{■fsrwitfoa. (Al pcnwii ta Vetera wmA 

Tkeii ii BO ctargi for mwi ailldM ar pietwea. 
FtetiTM CMHMH b« retvrMd aitas nmial 




Service recognized 



/ 



Captain W. Jay Nace (from the right), supply officer, presents a ten-year servkc award to Ms. Phyllis R. Hopkins 
durii^ a special ceremony In the supply department at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. Hopkins, a procurement officer 
in the purchase division, is Joined by co-workers Lieutenant David S. Yates, purchase officer, and Ms. Katrina 
Helwig, supervisory procurement agent. Hopkins lives on Sllina Drive in Virginia Beach. 



City considers establishment of 'airport zone' 



Lt. Comdr. Sam Jack- 
son, USN, with the Naval 
Air Station at Oceana, has 
asked the city to consider 
establishment of an "air- 
port zone" which would 
sunound an airport. 

Existing zoning would 
continue, he said, but 



within an airport zone. 

He made the sugges- 
tion, which he will explain 
later in more detail, 
during discussion of an 
ordinance which allows 
private community centers 
in the AG- 1 Agricultural 
District. City Council 




Use the telephone when you can 



By HARVEY RIDINGER 



Thinking of applying for Social Security benefits? 
Have a question about Medicare? Need to report a 
change of address for your supplemental security 
income checks? Want to request a statement of earnings 
reported for you? 

There's no need to waste gas, money or bus fare going 
down to the Social Security office. And then cooling 
your heels waiting to talk with someone. Just pick up 
the phone! Almost all Social Security business can be 
handled this way. 

Here are just some of the matters that can be taken 
care of by telephone: 

• Applying for Social Security or supplemental 
security income payments. 

• Applying for Medicare. 

• Requesting a change of name or address 6n Social 
Security records. 

• Reporting events that may affect receipt of chnrks, 
such as starting or stopping work . 

• Reporting a lost or stolen check or a delayed 
payment. 

• Replacing a lost or missing Social Security or 
Medicare card. 

• Getting help with filling out Medicare forms. 

• Getting an estimate of monthly benefit amount. 

• Requesting a statement of earnings reported to a 
person's Social Security record. 

• Finding out if a particular health facility takes part 
fri Medicare. 

• Getting help in r^uesting a review of the decision 
made on a claim. 

• Getting the answer to any question on Social 
Security. SSI, ur Medicare and requesting copies of free 
publications on these programs. 

Like most businesses. Social Security offlces have 
certain periods when they are particularly busy. The 
first week of each month is one of those times because 
that's when Social Security and SSi checks are 
delivered. It is not unuitual for ail teiescrvice lines to be 
busy then, and you may have difficuliy getting through. 

Unless your business is urgent, it is better to call after 
the middle of the month. The lines also may be less busy 
later each day or toward the end of each week. 

When you call, l»ave your Sodal Security card (or 
KAdicare card if you're calling about that) handy, as 
well as any papers you think may be pertinent . This will 
speed up the interview. 

The Norfolk Social Security Office is located at 200 
Gfanby Mall, Room 600, in the Federal Building. The 
hours are *a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Th« phone number is 441- 
3401. 



approved the ordiiumce 
Monday afternoon. Agri- 
cultural and industrial 
uses are promoted by the 
Navy in the vicinity of 
Oceana. 

Existing regulations 
permit private community 
and social center in only 
the B-2 Community-Busi- 
ness District. Public com- 
munity centers are per- 
mitted uses in zoning di^ 
trict other that B-2 Com- 
mui^y fhisihess, ihclud- 
'14^ "^^^f d; f«idfen^ 
nature. 

Other ordinances 
approved by council: 

Reduce the allowable 
number of horses in riding 
academies from Ave to 
thi^ee per acre. 

Change the require- 
ments govoning housing 
diversity in planned deve- 
loinnents. The existing 



regulations require that a 
minimum of three differ 
rent housing types be 
induded in a planned 
development, as well as 
single-family homes. In 

addition to single-family 
homes only two other 
dwelling types will now be 
required. 

Include projects for 
which preliminary sub- 
division plat approval has 
been granted 'in a provi- 
sion stating thatttiy 'pro- 
ject for which an active 
use permit, valid building 
permit or certificate of 
occupancy has been issiied 
can be required to make a 



change in plans or con- 
struction of the project 
due to a subsequent 
amendment to ,the Com- 
prehensive Zoning Ordi- 
nance. 



CAR WASH 



from page I 

said the sheer price of the ^ 
property, which is zoneo^ 
B-2 (business) will attract 
better quality businesses. 
Voting agains| an>roval 
were Coimdlmen Ervin, 
Donald Merrick and R. L. 
Riggs, and Coundlwoman 
M^era Obondorf and 



Barbara Henley. Voting 
for approval were Mayor 
Patrick L. Stuiding, who 
voted against approval 
previously, Councilmen 
Ferrell, Clarence Holland 
and J. Curtis Payne Jr., 
and McCoy. Councilman 
John A. Baum was 
absent. 



SUBSCRIBER SERVICE ■ 

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BEACH SUN, please mail this form witii 
yourchcdcto: 

THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 

138 Rosemont Road 

Virginia Beacli, Va. 23452 

PLEASE CHECK HERE D IF THIS IS A NEW 
SUBSCRIPTION. 

PLEASE CHECK HEIIE O if yon arc now recdvta| 
the VIRGINIA BEACH SUN awl are renewini yoar 
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ALL OTHER AREAS 

Dmc year $9.00 
Dtwoyc«i«$lS.tO 



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ADDRESS 

CITY 

ZIP 




Today 
college 
counts 



The Learning Resources Center 

By RICHARD E. HOEHLEIN 

The Learning Resources Center at the Virginia Beach 
campiis of Tidewater Community College contains 
media materials, equipment and other resources to 
support the instructional programs of the campus and 
to aid students, faculty, administrators and members of 
the community. 

The Learning Resources Center, which houses the 
library, the learning laboratory and the audio-visual 
laboratory, is located in Building B, identifiable as the 
only two-storey building on ounpus. 

All facilities of the center are open to use by members 
of the community, whether they are affiliated with the 
college or not. During the regular academic year the 
facilities are open Monday through Thursday, 7:45 a.m. 
- 10 p.m.; Friday, 7:43 a.m. - 8 p.m.; and Saturday, 
8:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. ^ 

The library acquires, organizes and makes available 
print material which includes books, newspapers, 
magazines, pamphlet files and a browsing collection for 
popular reading. 

The library staff has prepared fact sheets, work sheets 
and social bibliographies to help you use the library 
effectively. A reference librarian is stationed in the main 
reading-room to help you locate materials and use the 
library's Ic^ources. Appointments may be made for in- 
depth bibliographical and research assistance. 

A copy machine which makes photocopies and a 
microfilm reader/printer which produces copies of 
microfilm material are available for the convenience of 
the public at a cost of 10 cents per copy. 

If materials are not readily available at the TCC 
Jibraryi they can usually be obtained by intercampus 
and interlibrary loans which can be arranged upon 
request. 

The Learning Laboratory is the distribution center 
for all non-print materials including audio and 
videotype cassettes, records, slides, games, kits and 
transparencies. All materials in the learning lab can be 
used by the community with space availalbe for 
individuals and small groups. The Learning Lab 
publishes a catalog which lists all available materials by 
subject. / 

The Audio- Visual Laboratory produces audio- visual 
aids for instructional purposes and is staffed by 
individuals with professional experience in graphics, 
photography, television production, sound recording 
and electronics. The A-V lab is responsible for 
maintenance of all audio-visual equipment such as film 
and ovahead projectors, audio and video recording and 
playback units, and slide projectors. A few items of 
equipment are available for loan to members of the 
community upon request . 



The TCC I .earning Resources Center is for use by 
everyone in the commimity and augments rather than 
-competes with the public library system. The center may 
contain information in certain special interest areas 
relating to educational programs which may be be 
readily available through the public library . 

Any Virginia Beach resident over age 18 can use the 
Learning Resources Center simply by producing 
personal indenlification and a current address. 
Residents younger than 18 may use the facilities if 
accompanied by a parent or guardian or if the use is in 
conjunction with a special school project . 

Whether you are a TXX student or not, you arc 
invited to come by the Learning Resources Center to see 
what is available for your use. Tours of the facilities can 
be arranged for community groups by calling the 
Virginia Beach campus at 427-3070. 

Today coll^ counts! 



VSiginia Beadi Sun 



irSPSMt.140 

Haaes Bycriy 

Donald R.Fryc 

Cfwi lM— agw , 

Pan Vaadevccr 

Editwr 



Diane Bian^ SoadraCreef Vickie INeil 

P f ad tlia a Manftr Ad^wlUai Mautcf artatetion Mgr . 



Mi^ginJa Beach Sun 

Wrfaiiiiy, Somber 26, 1979 
SMV(ar,Na.39 

PibMiim ewty WitotiJay by Breily hiWcatiou «Htt Mk 
■Ida «met toeMMl at US Kmmmmm toai, Vir^i^ 
Vb|Wa]3«2. 



SmSCMPTION RATiS 



^raMaTMrvakrAfM 

OacYcar~|7.ai 

Tw»VMn>|ltM 



Al Otter Anaa 



ta paM M l^a^Hvaa 



VtallalaBiffc.Vlil^da. 



ittmm^^ 



■iMMafiCHBHtt 



laaatttt^iHai 



Mh^a^^b^^H 



i^^^Hl 



^^^ 



Auto show tUs Sunday 
sponsored by rec center 

On Sunder, Septc^bct 30«loa't be surpriMd to find 
»|e nonh pwkuiB lot of Uie Virfjnto i«Kh Recraukm 
^enter-KempsviUe trusfmned into • fi|utic or lot. 
Specialty cars from tome of TidcwMcr's most 
Pre»igious car dubs will be on display aloai wUh area 
dealerships showing off tlidr IMOoodds. 

All varieties of can wiU be availaMe tot viewing from 
!-6 p.m. The Hemdon Edwards Bnnd will provide 
eiwertainrtent from 1-S p.m. Bring the eniire family, 
there are no entrance fees. Refrahmenu will also be 
available. 

For further information contact the Virginia Beach 
Rwrcation Center-Kempsville, 800 Monmouth Lane, or 
call499-1281. 



Library offers maga^ne iiidex 

The Virginia Beach Public Ubrary's Reference 
Division has installed "The Magazine Index", a new 
service that enables the pubUc to quickly search an index 
for all articles that have recently appeared in 372 of the 
most popular magazines. The indw. is located at the 
Bayside Branch Library. It enables an individual to 
search by subject, author, product name or other "key 
words". 

The index is on nucrofilm for easy access. Each 
month the file will be ecpanded until it contains five full 
years of information : 




Arts and entertammenT 



October planetarium program takes 
a look at early days of astrology 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUNDWEPNISPAY. SErTEMBERM^ !»»» ^ 

Wide variety of arts classes offered 
this fall at Virginia Beach Arts Center. 

Some of the classes offered this fall *t the Virginia The workshops have begun; the next ones «dU be pan 
Beach Arts Center integrate the arts. One is a poetry of the Open House, September 30 from ^$. Classes, 
workshop/class offered on Wednesday evenings by except for Sarah White's Handbuiiding for Children, 
LindaMizejewski. Ms. Mizejewski, whose own work wiU start October 1. Ms. White's popular class will get 
im been published m Harpers and in both national and going Saturday, Sept. 29. Call the center at 42«-9294 for 
re^Ml poetry reviews, is an experienced teacher. Now registration, questions, and information, 
at OOu, she has taught at universities in Ohio and 

Arkansas. For three ywu-s she was an instructor in the ' 

Poetiy in the Schools Program here in Virginia Beach 
and before that in Arkansas, Ms. Mizejewski sees 
poetry not only as words but also performance - as 
sound and gesture. Her class will read and discuss 
specific poems and work faito writing their cWn as well. 

On Saturday afternoons, children will have a dass 
that (»mbines thwiter, an, and movement, taught by 
Vai Kiefer and Nan Johnson. They will be able to make 
puppets, to act like monstm, hurricanes, lunchboxes - 
whateverl and to paint and collage, using skills and 
themes Ms. Kiefer has developed very successfully in 
Virginia and New Jersey school programs. 

Other new classes on the schedule include drawing the 
head, by Suzanne Stevens; drawing movement for 
childro), by Carol Weisberg; making a book and 
lithography whh Lee Brady; tapestry with Karen Hide 
and advanced weaving with Helen Brewer; and a Super- 
8 film production raurse with David Driscolt. 

Beginning, intermediate, and advanced courses are 
offered in drawing/painting, crafts, words/letters, 
printmaking, photography, and ceramics. Some fony 
classes are on the schedule as well as eight one and two 
day workshops. 



,n 



^fETOTHE 

lUAU 



The Virginu Beach City Public Schools Planetarium 
public program for October is a new story about old 
beliefs, "ChaMcr aad the SIms,*' which reveals how 
astrology was used in the days it was founded. 

During Chaucer's time, many things different from 



Parkway, and turning right at the first street - South 
Lynnhaven Road ~ to Plaza Junior High School, where 
the planetarium is located. 

The planetarium seats 120 people. Telephone the 
main office at^laza Junior High School, 486rl971, for 



Windsor Woods library 
sponsors magazine give-a-way 

Beginning September 30, the Windsor Woods Bnmch 
Library m be^fering^a Magazine Give-A-Way 
Program. The periodicals are duplicate copies and are 
being offered free to the public while supplies last. 

The Windsor Woods Branch Library is located at 
3612 South Plaza Trail in the Princess Anne Plaza area 
of Virginia Beach. For further information contact Janv 
Buonantuono at 340-1043. 



AT 

THE TIDEWATER DINNER TIffiATRE 
Enjoy LIVE ON STAGE! 

■OHIMWBJtmMilllH, 




•009' FroRi ^h# www 
"SOMR ENCHANTED EVENING- 
BLOODY MARY IS THE GIRL I LOVE" 

TM GONNA WASH THAT MAN RIGHT 

OUTTA MY HAIR- 
THERE IS NOTHING UKE A DAME" 
"YOUNGER THAN SPRmCTniE" 
"WONDERFULGUY" 



RESERVATI0N8: 



4«1-S§SS 



-those we knowtodq^kiAiiCMed a person's behefSiand-^eservations. Admission free;xhUdren under age llmav 



consequently, his lifestyle. 

After giving a brief ffmvk*/ of Chaudcr's life, the 
audience is given some insight into the evolution of 
thought penaining to astrological bdiefs that the 

snets, and their positions in the heavens, infhienc«l 
peoples lives. 

The planetarium demonstrates some cxamite of how 
Chaucer used references to astrology to describe 
personalities as they were influenced by the stars and 
planets, in his Canterbury Talcs. 

The recorded music few this program is performed 
vocally and on the lute, davichord, harpsichord, and 
guitar - all popular in the days of Chaucer. Some of the 
songs, however, are new. 

I Planetarium hours are Sunday, 7 to 8 p.m., Oct. 7, 
14, 21, and M; Tuesday, 7 to 8 p.m.. Oct. 9, 16. 23. and 

\ The planetarium is easily ikxessible from the 44 toll 
ipad by taking the Lynnhaven Exit to the Lynnhaven 



be refused admi^on unless accompanied by a tnatuirt 



person, ^''-'-in 



1.1.. i,iijii IjUu ■! j'l 



ACTUTEIIUYB B 

The iMB or womm «^ reads 



on hwal cvott, but 6i or he r 

-■ mUHJMI 

their "^BMriimii^ wJiqMKKr habit igjftt tkcm ba^nbiir^' 
not onqr a wol-inioniMcl person oomnfufiiy. 




yirglala 0aacli/s own MmyMMMr 



Beach woman 
appointed 

Mrs. Maggi L. Curry of 
Virginia Beach is one of 16 
persons recently ap- 
point^ to tepTcseat the 

state government and the 
state at large on the Vir- 
ginia Equal Employment 
Oportunity Committee. 



Qieat Neck Ubrary 
liresents film 
lirogram 

The Great Neck foanch 
Library will present a fttm 
program for children ages 
preschool through nine 
ylars of age on Saturday, 
||Member 29, at 11 a.m. 
1 40 minitte jHrc^nun is 
! and there is no regis- 
ation required. For fur- 
er information contact 
A. Pauley at 481-6094. 



CBS news correspondent to 
spcaltatVWC 

Fred Graham, Uw correspondent for CBS 
News, will be the featured speaker at Virginia 
^calQraa Cdkfe's fall convocation on Thursday, 
October 4, at 11:30 a.m- in the Cunningham 
Oymnasium. The program is free and open to 
the public. Graham will speak on "The Supreme 
Court: Antidote to Revolution." 



oftlieSUli 



G«( •xtra tophi of ffce VIrgMa 
Boaeh SUN at tho foUowtag Uot 
of iMMftfltonds heato^ throathout 
tlio Virginia Boacli 



NORTNHAMPTON BLVD. AREA 




Ciiemir (Lurlra, 3liir. 
3320 VAKACN BLVD. 
•UITt II, VA KACN 234S2 




Asni0i.«« Y Clasms 

Oct 23, 1979 7 P.IN. 

A lu^qiHt coifrae with c0rtlHcatlon 
fy «ifa(Uliedfat<nictor. CaroM OaMoft 



4B#.3f31 



ALL NEW! 
35th EDITION! 
Fri. SEPT. 28 
thm Sim. SEPT. 30 

NORFOLK SCOPE 

PEIirOIIIIANCEf:- 



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Itolldaylnii 

SNORE DRIVE AREA 

Big star mmyMt Shop. Ctr.) 



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Fri. Sq>l.2S |:OOPN 

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Sun. 8^.30 l:30m...SdOPM 

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Faad Fair (NMteii SlMp. CIr. ) 

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S-SMan BFil •-? TkiaaAllwra 



Alt Merchandise 
With this Coupon 

OffsrExpirw 

Oct etsi aa, lara 

Limit On* Pm Cutlomsr 



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Providence and KempsvilMi Road 

Virginia Baach, Virginia 




3* 9ff Mi MrfPC^k, 



Phona 424-1«at 

Houra 

Mon. thru Sat. 

10 AM to 9 P.M. 




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Oriental: 

Vases 

Teasets 

Figurines 

Woks 

Lotus Bowls 

Sake Sets 



Featuring 



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l^*hona M0.2967 



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Waterbeds & Accessories Bamtx>o Blinds 

Wicker & Rattan Furniture Bamboo Bird Cages 

Tapestries Mobiles ^ 

Barpboo Wall Hangings Wind Chimes 

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5 VIRGINIA BEACH SUNDWEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 26, 1979 



Preventing f ireplaf^e smoke back up 



/ 



By GENE GARY 

Q. We are in need of 
advice regarding our fire- 
place chimney. Our pro- 
blem is that occasionally 
smolce will inick up into 
the room. We live in a 
houx which has en em- 
bankment higher than the 
house. Can you suggest a 
solution before we have to 
start using the fireplace 
this winter? 

A. Here is some general 
advice. To overcome the 
smoky starting of the fire, 
just before starting it, 
ligiit one end of a twisted 
piece of newspaper and 
shove it up the fireplace 
throat. This is usually 
enough to start a draft in 
the chimney. 

If the fire continues to 
smoke, it may be due to 
the draft interference, 
caused in your case by the 
embankment and the wind 
direction. In that event, it 
may be necessary to heigh- 
ten your chimney. At any 
rate, the chimney should 
be at least four feet above 
a flat roof and two feet 

above the highest point of 
a gable roof. In your case, 
the flue may need a cap to 



shield against a down^ 
draft. 

Among other general 
suggestions, always be 
sure tlM dampo^ is open 
sufficiently to provide 
proper draft. The depth of 
the fireplace should not be 
l£ss than 20 inches, and 
the opoiing at the front 
should be greater than 10 
or 12 times the ares of the 
flue. 

Another possibility is 
that your fireplace open- 
ing may be too high. This 
can be ronedied by instal- 
ling a metal hood across 
the top of the fireplace 
opening. The distance can 
be determined by experi- 
menting with sheets of 
heavy cardbouxl. 

I have a strong feeling 
that your particular pro- 
blem is caused by the high 
embankment and fickle 
winds. If you cannot build 
the chimney higho*, a 
chimney cap should help. 

Q. I recently purchased 
a 30-year-old house in 

Pungo with wooden win- 
dows and frames. In ^ite 
of most of the weight 
mechanisms and lines 
being free, the windows 



Here's 
how 



# A. ^ •» ^ 




are hard to raise and 
lower. Can they be made 
to work properly? — 
Bruce R.C. 

A. Try applying paste 
floor wax in the grooves 
where the' windows slide. 
Or a product called WD- 
40, ordinuily used for 
metal, could be grayed 
on the window slides. It 
comes in an aerosol can. 
White vaseline, which is 
sometimes used on sticky 
wooden drawers, may 
help. 

lliere also is a dry 
lubricant in an aerosol 
can. called Spray and 
Glide, which according to 

the claims helps free 
jammed windows, stuck 
doors and drawers. This is 
manufactured by Sealec- 
tro Corp., 225 Hoyt St., 
Mamaroneck, N.Y. 

Q. I have an e}g)ensive 




old Windsor chair, stained 
maple. It has developed a 
dull luster and in some 
areas it has a milky film. I 
do not know how to bring 
back the original luster 
and remove the unwanted 
film. Thanks for any sug- 
gestion. — E.S.H. 

A. A hazy, cloudy or 
fibny look on a polished 
wood flnish may result 
from applying wax or 
polish too heavily or too 
often. On old furniture, it 
may be a4i^ild-up of old 
wax and soil. To avoid 
dimming the beauty of the 
wood, connnonly called 
"hazing." apply any qua- 
lity furniture-care pro- 
duct, lightly. Then buff 
the wood as much as the 
product directions sug- 
gest. Rewax or polish 
only when necessary — 
genially two or three 
times a year, but more 
often for pieces that get 
hard use. Do not use oil 
polishes except on low- 
luster (oil type) flnishes. 

To remove haze from a 
polished wood fmish. I 
suggest you apply Simoniz 
Paste Kleener with a damp 
cloth to one small area at a 
time. As it dries, rub the 
am with a dean dry 
cloth. The cleaner re- 
moves the old wax as well 
as soil. The product is 
availably in auto-supply 
stores. 



Qwatioiu OB baydlng, 

refMiir may be sent to 
Here's How, in care of the 
irgliiui iicscB simr 



< 



Signature guarantee protects you 



By JUDITH G. 
RHOADES 



Q. I own a mutual fund. 
I recently called the head- 
quarters on the phone 
requesting some shares be 
sold and the proems be 
sent to me. They told me I 
needed to have a signature 
guarantee. 

Why? Where can I get 
one?—A.P. 

A. The mutual fund 
managemoit requires a 
signature guarantee from 
you so that they will not 
be selling shares for some- 
one other than you. You 
should be glad that they 
take precautionary mea- 
sures on your behalf. 

You can obtain a signa- 
ture guarantee from your 
Virginia Beach iMUik or 
through your stockbroker. 
If you don't maintain an 
account with either, ttoi 
you should open an 
account at a bank conven- 
ient to your honw or 
business. It donn't have 
to be an ao^unt wUdi 
you use <»i a oominual 
bans, but whatever siae, 
the baink wUl maintain 
your signatui^ on fi}e, aiul 
it will tw a ^pte nattCT 
for y<Ni to SptfOm ycm 
verification or guarantee. 

Q. Is then S4cA a tU^ 
as being able to do my 
own divorce without a 
lawyer? I r&iUy cm't 
afford a lawyer beemise 
they charge so much 
money. — C. W. 

A. Yes, there is in 
Virginia as weU as the 



District of Columbia and 
Arizona, California, 
Colorado, Connecticut, 
Florida. Iowa, Illinois, 
Maine, Maryland, Massa- 
chusetts. Missouri, Nev- 
ada, New 3et9ey, New 
York, North Carolma, 
Ohio, Pennsylvania, 
^ Texas, Washington and 
Wisconsin. 

According to Money 
magazine, there is a 
divorce kit which you can 
buy, whidi wiU show you 
step by step how to fill in 
the proper papers, and fite 
them with the court. It 
should tell you what will 
happm when you have 
your hearing and how to 
prei»ure the papers for that 
also. 

If yova husband con- 
tests your divorce, then 
you wouU be wiser to seek 
the services of a Uwyer. 
Go to a clinic or le^ aid. 

If you (k> use a do-it- 
yoursdf method, make 
certain that the book you 
buy was written by a 
lawyor who is in inactice 
m Virginia. 

Q, I tan just about 
ready to retire from my 
Job — kss than a year 
away. I wtmt to know 
wfut to do abom Sodal 
Seairity and how to ap/^y 
forit.—A.V. 

Q. My husband dM 
two months t^o. My sister 
told nK tfut I ^rnuld 
ai^y for SotM SeewUy 
becaux I ha\^ two youi^ 
chMm. Can I? Am I 
eligible? What do I do? — 

A. L« me answer put 



You 

and your 

money 




of the second question 
flrst. 

Yes, you may be en- 
titled to montlily pay- 
ments for you and your 
children. Tbett is even a 
spedal rule, that cash 
payments can be made to 
a worker's children and 
their mother or fitther 
even though the worker 
dies with less than the 
required amount of credits 
needed to obtain Social 
Security. All that is 
needed is for your hus- 
band to have worked 
under Social Security for 
Got of the last one-and- 
one half years during the 
three years before his 
dotth. « 

You shouM apiriy at the 
Social Security o^ce lo- 
cated at 200 Granby Mall. 
room 600 in the Federal 
BuiUing. Norfdk. l^e 
phone number is 441- 
3401. 

People who are ^tbig 
ready to retue slwdd 
apirty to the Social Secu- 
rity office at Inst two to 
thne months i»ior to 
r^ironent. A long dday 
in appl^ng for monthly 
beiwfiu can ause Iok of 
sMne benefiu sinw teck 
l^mnts can be made for 
IK) nwre than 12 months. 

If ^u are ynng to. 



apply for your Medicare 
insurance you should do it 
three months before your 
birthday of the year you 
readi 65. Remembe that 
when you apply for the 
hospital portion of your 
Medicare, you will auto- 
matically by enroled in 
the medical insurance part 
of Medicare, which costs 
you a monthly fee. unless 
you inform Social Security 
people that you don't 
want it. 

Jadith Rhoadcs Is a 
free tasM wrilv wIm hn 
spcat IS yean in the 
•ecniUies iadostry. If you 
have aay questioas r^ard- 
l^ teaacc, lecvittes or 
the MMk auuket, yoa nay 
addras Itoa to her hi care 
of the Vli^ida Beach Son. 
Plane be certafai to en- 
close a self-addressed 
stenped eavdope for yoar 
pMSOMd te^. Msm a 
lofiix weslu for 



M^uotcrrLACE 

Ike ctaMiflcd Mcdoa of yow 



onrfcti phHC of the ( 
n tooM the iMentttd < 
m ao ortw adverting en do. 
TWt it hMMM the cuihMBcn ta 
ysw M^^hsehood tm to the 
danHlHi ptta and mrch ooi 
tfK MhtrtiMMat for triw he or 



Do gas savers really save gas? 



Most drivers would like to find a way, any way, to 
save gasoline because saving gas saves money. With the 
cost of ^u rising steadily, manufacturers of so called, 
"gm saving" devices are stepping up their sales 
campaigns. The Better Business Bureau warns motorists 
that most of these products do not live up to the claims 
made for them. Many claims are exaggerated and 
misleading, and data offered to substantiate them have 
often been inaccurate, outdated or otherwise 
insufficient. The Enviroiunental Protection Agency 
(EPA) has tested many devices for which fuel saving 
claims are made and has found little significant mpg 
improvement - not enough, any way. to justify the cost 
of purchase and installation. 

Types of products 

Gas-saving products on the market can be divided 
into three categories: friction-reducing lubricants, fuel 
catalysts, and mechanical devices. 

Friction-reducing oils are either all synthetic or have a 
petroleum base. The synthetic additives in the lubricant 
reduce engine friction, thus increasing fuel economy. 
Manufacturers claim that these products improve 
performance significantly. Car owners should check the 
owner's manual to make sure their cars can accept a 
friction-reducing oil, and whether or not the longer 
periods recommended between oil changes will void 
their new car warranty. 

Fuel catalysts are added to the gas tank on the theory 
that they break down hydrocarbons and increase 
mileage. However, experts agree it is probably better to 
have a tune-up. 

An array of mechanical devices -- water or alcohol 
injector systems, replacement distributor rotors, 
"miracle" spark plugs, air jets, etc. - have been tested 



by the EPA. The results indicate that none provides 
significant improvement in mile per gallon 
performance. 

Proven oMtkods 

Since new products are being tested everyday, it is 
conceivable that several may be proven safe, efficient, 
and low-cost gas conservers in the near future. 
Meanwhile, there are proven methods drivers can use 
now to save gasoline. These include: 

- Reducing speed and obso^ing the 35 mph speed 
limit. A speed reduction from 60 to 50 mph cuts gas 
consumption by 10%. • • 

- Keeping the car well-tuned. Regular tune-ui» can 
mean an immediate 9 to 15% improvement in gasoline 
mileage. 

- Inflating tires properly. Underinflated tires increase 
a car's rolling resistance so more gas is required. '^ 

- Avoiding fast starts and stops. Hot rod driving and 
jerky acceleration can increase fuel consumption by two 
miles per gallon in city traffic. 

- Reducing the car's load. Air conditioners, other 
auto accessori^. and unnecessary cargo add weight, 
and cost, to operating a car. 

- Commuting by carpool or using public 
transportation and planning car trips so that one trip 
accomplishes several functions. 

- Turning off the engine if it is idle for more than a 
minute. 

The Better Business Bureau advises consumers that 
reliance on gas-saving gadgets for better mileage will do 
little except make their wallets a bit lighter. The best 
course to follow is one of routine auto maintenance and 
good driving habits. 



Consumer interests 

Beware of chain letter schemes 



} 



It seems that chain letters, like old soldiers, never die. 
From San Francisco to Virginia Beach, from Chicago to 
Miami, the lure of easy money has unsuspecting victims 
plunking down as much as $100 each hoping to reap 
illusory profits from chain letter opportunities. The 
Better Business Bureau urges those who receive letters to 
use caution. 

"Win the dide be unbroken?" 

Thel astest vogue in chain Ittters is called the "ci rde" 
letter. This particular scheme asks the recipient to pay 
. S50 for the letter and send S50 to the first person on a ., 
list of 12. The buyer removes the top name, adds his or 
her own at the bottom, sells two copies, and presto: 
SlOO com« bask. Then, according to the pitch, 
participants need only sit back and wait for the money 
to roll in as letters including their names spread to a 
geometrically increasing portion of the population. So 
long as no one breaks the chain, everybody wins... or do 
they? 

Those receiving this type of chain letter should keep 
in mind that the definition Of a chain letter money- 
making scheme is "the exploitation of many by a few." 
The chain almost always gets broken. Chain letters tend 



to spread rapidly and then die down rather quickly. 
Only a smaill number of people, usually the organizers. ^ 
gain at the expense of a much larger number. It's farily 
easy for the chain letter promoters to benefit from these 
schemes because the names and addresses used est often , 
phony. With the "circle" chain letter scheme, it may be \ 
easy to sell the letter at first, but after a while people - 
begin to have trouble selling their copies. Remember 
Jhat if the letter cannot be sold to others, the buyer's , 
name never gets into circulation thereby curtailing the j 
, cha^pesjQ i;ec5ixfi.*ny Rioiiey, /\)sp,. Keep injnind that it 
is possible for others to redo the letter and change the s 
order of the names to improve their position. :) 

Many chain letters are illegal ^1_„_^ 

Chain letter schemes that involve the mailing of i 
money or any other item of value violate federal law. 
Watch out for the chain letter that claims to be perfectly > 
legal, but then says that money has to be mailed at some '] 
point. If money, a bond or other valuable item is to be q 
mailed, the entire scheme is ill^al. Those encouraged to 
participate in any mail scheme that seems to be fraudulentv 
should save all evidence including envelopes. a 



Beach CP A 
faces trial 

A Virginia Beach CPA 
faces an October 23 trial 
date in U. S. District 
Court at Norfolk after he 
pleaded not guOty to 
charges of failing to file 
federal individual income 
tax returns for 1976 and 
1977. 

JohnT.KeUyJr.,49.of 
Academy Rd. in Virginia 
Beach was released on 
$3,000 personal bond by 
District Judge Richard B. 
Kellam. 

hiterim U.S. Attorney 
Justin Willuuns said mfor- 
mation filed with the court 
indicates that Kelly re- 
ceived income totaling 
$59,051 for 1976 $65,724 
m 1977. 

The diarge carries a 
maximum penalty of one 
yeas in jaU and $10,000 
fine on each oaaai. 




DIAMOND 
REMOUNTING 



We buy 
GOLD & DIAMONDS 

ALL WORK 
DONE ON PREMISES 



Rinehart Brothers 

461-8261 

Suite 319 

Janaf Office Building 

Norfolk, VA 23502 




Colonial Shoe Repair 

COLLEGE PARK SHOPPING CENTER 



L 



PHONE 424 7433 

6557Aiib«niDrivt 
VMMIM KACN. VA. 234«4 



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A Imc fllltd wtth your household dlscaiilt gm holp a loll 
Tho MsMiwa AnioricMit of TMowatof dospofoioly noos your 
housohold dhcards to ralso funds for dtoaUod Votorano. Wo 
nood doMiK (moo's, womon's and chRdron's) simM 
ap p Hanc os, fumtturo, dtehos, books, toys, rugs, t.v.% 
kltchon waros* 



tetAte««Ai^yfMi«^Ai^(lHio 

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6 VWGINU BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26. 197Q 




WaUpaper makes a diamatic background 



"JL"-iT!.'^*T*~ '■* funibliliir ire natclied in tbdr dnuai liy this plaid waUptper by Van Lait, DesitBen 
added tiie daric stain moidiag to provide arcliitectarai detail In the room. •'^-i"*" 

iieacii real estate 



Apartment modes 



Squeezing more space out of the kitchen 



By LESUE AYERS 

The space above the 
kitchen cabinets is often a 
storage or display area 
that goes to waste. 

With today's living 
space in Tidewater apart- 
ments at a premium, this 
added area is too valuable 
ngt to use. Ther&semany 
efTident yet decor«ive 
ways to use the over-the- 
cabinet area. 

If you are a wine fan- 
cier, consider building in 
wine racks above the cabi- 



nets to display your collec- 
tion. If the cabinets are 
colored and laminated, 
you might consider leav- 
ing the wine racks^ in 
natural wood. By having 
the wine racks go to the 
ceiling, the room appears 
to have higher ceilings 
thaak jctuaUy^does,^ 

If storage is a problem, 
build open shelves over 
the cabinets. Since the 
shelves are open, try to 
store interesting and 



colorful items that 
attractive to look at. 



are 



If you don't need the 
space for storage, use it to 
provide a decorative 
touch, p^onsider arranging 
baskets or plants like ivy 
that don't need a lot of 
li^t, yet fin the space. - 

arrangement of drinking 
mugs or little-used cook 
books. 

Use you imagination in 
arranging these items. 



You don't have to fill 
every inch of space. A 
little organized, fun clut- 
ter can add warmth to the 
room. 

It's true that most 
people don't look up often 
and their eyes usually 
Men't raised above a cer- 

happen to gaze upward in 
your kitchen, what a plea- 
sant surprise to find this 
often-neglected area put 
to a creative use. 



Free class for homebuyers scheduled for Thursday night 



By LIN J. COOPER 



Dhtclwef 



Thursday night, September 27, Tidewater Builders 
Association will sponsor the last quarterly session of 
1979 of its Home Buyers School. This class, which is 
designed in just two and a half hours, to teach people 
how to buy a home, will be held at the Sheraton Inn- 
Military Circle in Terrace Meeting Room 3. It starts at 7 
p.m. It's free and open to the public. 

During the session attendees will receive a 
concentrated mini-course which includes lectures, a 
question and answer period, a slide presentation, and a 
number of hand-outs and examples. 

Some of the topics covered by the guest lecturers are 
home selection, housing as a hedge against inflation, 
types of financing, loan qualification, contracts, closing 
costs, prepaids and the settlement procedure. 

The Home Buyers School, which has been in existence 
for two years, has seen hundreds of eager young home 
buyers attend its classes. Most of them don't need to be 
convinced of the fact that homeownership is the best 
investment in the market today. Most only need to be 
shown how they can afford a house whose price seems 
to be escalating almost daily beyond their reach. 
Consequently, a great deal of stress is placed on going 
over the qualifications for VA, FHA, FHA 245 
(graduated mortgage payment plan), and others. Each 
has its own qualification formula and I've found that 
this one section of the class is probably the most 
important and the most interesting to the first-time 
prospective homebuyers. 

Most of the attendees have never seen these formulas 
laid out for them or been exposed to the fact that there 
is more than one way to buy a home. 

With the average new home in Virginia Beach and 
Chesapeake now at $38,000, the unfortunate part of the 
market today is that with inflation and heavy demand 
driving up pri^, more and more young people are 
being frozen out of the market. 

Population experts are now saying that the 
population increases we've seen in Virginia B^ch and 
Chesapeake are slowing and that we should see some 
leveling off. Howcvct, that doesn't present thcVhole 
picture when it com« to housing because the number of 
households is actually increasing steadily. It's important 
to make a distinction here. 

The number of single homebuyers, the number of 
homebuyers where two unmarried people pool resources 
to buy jointly, and the number of married couples 
without children is rairidly incrauing . These pec^le do 
not represent a pofNiktion increase buy they do 
r^M-esent a households incrwse. F^ple are putting off 
^ting married or having families, Iwt thqr still want to 
be^me established in hmnes of tfirir own. Demand 



Notes from the 
shelter industry 




therefore, will not be expected to slow, which means 
unfortunately that prices will continue to go up. 

The housing industry has been pushing for legislation 
to alleviate this critical problem. In the meantime, local 
associations like Tidewater Builders Association are 
trying to help homebuyers get the most house possible 
for the money they have to spend by educating them in 
the intricacies of the homebuying process. 

Seats are still available in the Thursday night session. 
One or more can be reserved for anyone wishing to 
atend by calling TBA, 461-9140 and asking for me or 
Kathy O'Hara. Dates for 1980 have also been 
established and a quick phone call will assure a 
prospective attendee of a 1980 brochure. 

Head nurse appointed 

Sharon Slawta, R.N. 
was appointed head nurse 
of the Two East Wing at 
General Hospital of Virr 

ginia Beach recently. Miss 
Slawta is a graduate of the 
St. Elizabeth School of 



Nursing in Utica, New 
York. She was assistant 
patient care coordinator 
(head nurse) on a medical- 
surgical unit of The 
Williamsport Hospital in 
Williamsport, Pennsyl- 
vania. 



RyBARBAXA 

HARTUNG 

Q. I am trying to de(Me 
whetlur I can use wail- 
Pilfer or not in our living 
room. 

Although we are now 
stationed in Virginia 
Beach through the Navy, 
we have pkked up a 
number of interesting 
small pieces and accesso- 
ries m our tnvHs in 
Eun^ ami the Or^t. 
We like what we have but 
the room is rather blah. 

However, if we wall- 
pap» the walls, I wonder 
If the waUp«per wiU fight 
with the pictures and 
paintings. Do you have 
anysuggestionkio h^ me 
decide? 

A. Don't discard the 
idea of walloov^rinj|» be- 
cause you have lots of 
accessories for your walls. 
Remonber that wallcover- 
ings omne in a wide variety 
of designs from wildly 
large-scale prints to solid 
cotor ^ple textures. 

Whatt you will want to 
find is a background wall- 
paper that will create a 
unifying effect and add 
pnsonality to the room. 
Choose a background 
paper to enhance the 
room's furnishings and 
accessories without steal- 
ujg then- thunder. 

To msure this, look at 
simple textural effects 
such as grass cloths and 
woven fabrics, subtle 
traditional patterns which 
are colored in soft, gentle 
tones or a classic cane or 
soft phud. These can mix 
antiques and contempor- 
ary, American or Euro- 
pean and Oriental, and 
evoi formal and mformal. 
Q. I want to do some- 
thihittdtnybedrbm: Thi 




Decor 
score 



room. 

Antique your dark 
mahogany night stands an 
old gold. Freshen up 
lamps with crisp white 
shades. Hang prints or 
drawings with wide white 
mats on your walls. 

Accessorize with pil- 
lows, lamp bases and art 
objects in yellow, brass or 
chrome. When accessori- 
zing, your colors might 
vary from lemon to mus- 
tard to add interest. 

Q. We have an old 
Virginia Beach home we'd 
lilv to renovate in a 
Georgian period. When 
the house Was built it did 



First Va. Bank 
opens sixth 
Beach office 

Fust Virginia Bank of 
Tidewater has opened its 
sixth office in Virginia 
Beach, located at 1344 
North Great Neck Road. 

The new full service 
branch containing 2,600 
sq. ft. of customo- service 
space has three drive-in 
tdlers. Office hours are 9 
a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday 
through Friday, with the 
branch reopening from 
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. 
Thursdays and 3:30 p.m. 



not have induded any 
rich, architectural detail- 
ing we so much admire in 
Georgian houses. I'd like 
to mstall a dome for the 
chandelier In the dining 
room and aid carved 
pieces ovo" the doors in 
the living room, dining 
nom and entry hall. 

I also have always ad- 
mired sheU rdclm which 
flank a ftre/^Mx and give 
a vwy formal look to the 
room. 

b this kind of work 
available today or is it a 
lost art? — W.R.T. 

A. Carved niclws and 
moldings and ceiling 



' domes are definitely hard 
to come by today and 
prohibitively expensive for 
most homeowners when 
available. However, a 
Southern firm. Focal 
Point Inc., offers authen- 
tically created moldmgs, 
stair brackets, ova--door 
pieces, mantles, domes, 
niches and ceiling medal- 
lions in a polyurethane 
material ready for finish- 
ing. 

The architectural orna- 
ments are elegantly exe- 
cuted to create the rich 
traditional background 
for restorations or a con- 
temporary home with a 
historic setting. 

You might write to 
Focal Pouit Inc., for more 
mformation. The address 
is 2005 Marietta Road 
Northwest, Atlanta, Ga. 
30318. 

Pieaie send qocstions 
for Decor Score to the 
Vto^ofai Beach Sun. 



JA announces vohmteer firms 



to 6:30 p.m. on Fridays. 
om ine ^^'^'^^y hows are .?lsp -^....- ^r.-.r^r^,,^^^^... ■ — „ „^^.,^ 
bedspread^-Q^tfimiP- ''JW^'^^B^^fM^.v. E«??|gft9fiW»rvd bnuo,. "HJH^'^CqH^F^ 
cohred floral print whh «°d Inve-m^rviceavaU- : .... „. .. 



AUu Veeck, executwe 
director for Junior 
Achievement of Tidewater 
announced that the fol- 
lowmg firms would be 
providug volunteer coun- 
selors for the more than 75 
companies nm by teen- 
aged Junior Achievers 
during the 1979-80 pro- 
gram year. 

Bank of Virginia, 
Eastern; CAP Tei^hone 
Company, Dominion 
Nati<M!al Bank. Fiddity 
American Baidc. Firtt ft 
Merdiants National Bank, 
Fhst Virghiia Banlc. Ford 



toMlms of white and old 
gold ami tke airpeting is 
beige. I'd like ideas for 
colors and accents in the 
room. 

I have two old, rather 
marred mahogany night 
stmds and a very nice 
plan oak chest, circa 
1800, in the room. 

I want to repaint the 
beige walls. There is some- 
thbtg missing but I don't 
know what Uis.— L.P. 

A. Why not be dramatic 
and use a very soft shrimp 
color of paint for your 
walls to give a mellow 
background glow to the 



and dbrive-in ^rvice avi^- 
able from 9 a.m. to 12 
p.m. 

TTie manager of this 
office is bank vice presi- 
dent James W. Brown. 
First Virginia Bank, with 
a^ets of $178 miUion, has 
30 offices serving south- 
eastern Virginia. 



IBM Corp., Mutual 
Federal/Life Federal Sav- 
mgs ft Loan, NARDAC. 
Naval Air Rework Fad- 
Bty. Naval Supply Center, 
Naval Air Staticm, Nor- 
folk Shipbuilding ft Dry- 
dock, Smith Douglass; 

United Virgmia Bank, 
Vfa-ginia Oiemicals Inc.. 
Virgbiia Electric ft Power 
Onnpany, Virginia Na- 
tional Bank, Virginian 
Pflot/Ledger Star, Vir- 
gmia Society, Tidewater 
Chapter of CPA's; 

Norifolk State Univer- 
sity, Old Dominion Uni- 
vmity, Ti^PWtK: Com-" 



U 



, ^ J-, r.>,. -,,*. 



PSALESMAN 
AUGUST 



SUIEBITE 

You're sure to tet a Wte if you 
drop a Mne in the dawfied 
oohiau of your community 
newipmer. Your dasHfied ad it 
pait of tlw homeiowii news that 
evenrbody wants to read as wdl 
as the news of Uie community. 



JIM COCHRANE C.II4. 

481-3103 Rm. 
420-3120 Office 



J^ygy — e»y.lae. 




l¥of0ctyotfrliiv».tm«iit/Se0oiieof«^#M«irj,gaiwl?e^^ 

You can trust a Realtor! 





tb 



Tayfor Brothers 
Realty Ca 



aUMTYMNKKIMIAO 



i^icarbo,Jfnt 

fa Mo MMMi of OrMt «fft^ 
MlMnttowiilM 

ommpoiIm. v«. aasao 



SASSER 



MLS 
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MLS 




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'rt 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER U, iyy» 7 



L,awii & garden 



Unusual blooms for spring bouquets 



/ 



a, 



By PATRICK DENTON 

When the averafc gardener thinks of spring 
flowering bulbs, the big three naturally spring to 
mind— tulips, hyacinth ami daffodils. 

True, these are magnificent flowers for either the 
outdoor spring garden or indoor potted plantings, but 
there are numoous (rther tess-known bulbs for fall 
planting and spring bloom that make unusual and 
chaiming additions to the badcyard garden. 

One real attention-grabber is the flowering onion, or 
Allium. Most of these prodiKe huge round, spiked 
flower heads larger than the head of a smaU child. A 
1978 priie-winner is Allium christophu. with amethyst 
florets. 

These are virtuaUy cvefree and hardy. They emerge 
each spring from the soO and produce their spectacular 
blooms which can be left to diy during the season, then 
picked for dried floral bouquets for the winter. 

Last fall we were pvm %obm Glory-of-the-Snow. or 
Chionodoxa, whidi we planted around the base of a 
small decorative deciduous tree. Early this spring we 
were completdy ddi^ted with the ivofusion of blue 
starlike blooms set in the slender decorative foliage. Our 
aniUl planting produced masses of cut flowers for the 
house. This is mie snudl bulb we will be sure to plant 
more of. 

Like heavy-headed beds set in slender foliage is the 
tall Fritillaria. These grow one to tine feet tall, and 
in-oduce most unusual bkxMns in checkered purple or 
white, redduh bro^ra, purple, red and ^llow. 

Winter aconite, or Eranthus, produce large, upturned 
buttercuiriike ftowm and are lovely mixed with white 
Snowdrops and dark purple aocus. 

For rock gardens and woodsy locations the 
Erythronium or Twat Mly b excdlent. The tiny, down- 
ward-facing lilylike flowers grow six to IS inches tall 
with attractive q)eckled foliage setting off the blooms; 

Hie snowflake. or IjeuoDJum wnum, differs from 
the Snowdn^) in that it tpjpeus more bell-like as it nods 
on its slender stems. Its blooms are white tipped with 
green. 



Fan gardening reminders 



Lawn care caurses 
offered at libraries 

The Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture has 
scheduted the following lawn care courses at the 
Virginia Beach Branch Libraries: 



Wayne Jones presents program 
to Laurel Cove Garden Club 




Backyard 
gardener 



Star-of-Bethldiem, or Omithogalum also produce 
green-tinted white blooms, upturned amidst Render 
grasslike foliage. Omithi^um umbellatum and nutans 
are hardy fm- outdoor planting. Othen make good 
indoor plants potted up six bulbs to a large pai and kept 
cool. 

Another indoor favorite is Oxalis, distinctive for its 
cloverlike leaves. It blooms in a variety of colors, some 
striped. 

Beautiful planted in front of daffodils u the Squill, or 
Sdlla. Sometimes calted bluebdls, it produces masses of 
bell-like flowers to each stem, set in thick grasslike 
foliage^Tlie Sdlla is the brightest blue of aU the spring 
flowering bulbs, and is effective massed closely in 
groups under high-branching trees. 

Another easy grower is the Grape hyacinth or 
Muscari, which produce tiny bunches of cobalt blue, 
grapelike flowers. The variety Early Giant is 
recommended for the showiest effect. 

Charming also is the Striped squill, or Puschkinia, 
which sends up four to dght inch stalks eadi with as 
many as six lushly pretaled flowers. Some are blue 
striped, other softs are white. 

So if your Virginia Beach yard has a bit of a wooded 
area, some space under high-branched trees, or space in 
a rockery, do try some of these more unusual spring 
flowmng bulbs. To find out where your nearest bulb 
nursery is located, contact the Virginia ]|each 
Department of Agriculture Cooperative Extmsion 
Service, 427-4769. 



Thursday, September 27, 7-8:30 p.m.; Lawn 
Maintenance, Windsor Woods Branch Library; 

Wednesday, October 3, 7-8:30 p.m.; Lawn 
Establishment, Oceanfront Branch Library; 

Wednesday, Oct. 10, 7-8:30 p.m.; Lawn 
Maintenance, Oceamfront Brach Library; 

Thursday, Novonber 8, 7-9 p.m.; Landscape 1, Great 
Neck Branch Library. 

Pre-registration is required at the branch in which the 
course is scheduled. For additional information call 
427-4321. 



the Laurel Cove Gax- 
den Club welcome new 
members at it's September 
meeting at the home of 
Mrs. Donice Shumm. The 
evening's guest was 
Wayne Jones who pre- 
sented an extensive pro- 
gram on flower ananging. 
Jones demonstrated the 
use of color, line, and 
materials in the design of 



arrangements. Refresh- 
ments ahd a business 
mwting followMi. Host- 
esses for the evoiing were 
Jane Jones and Barbara 
Smith. 



WtOEOIOKX 

For a wkfe chokx of buyen, 
roitcn, worken in yoiv 
neiglibortaood, uc tow cod 
dassirMd adi in your homMown 
newtpaper. Get loulu ipiick! 



1 



Here are s(mie Sei^em- 

ber gardening tips from 

' the XOifinia Dqwitment 

of Ag"n'ltwrr/rfTffpfra- 

tive Extension Service: 

Buildings lodtf MMftt' 
fences should be painted 
as often as necessary to 
-__ mainta in an attraetive 
aiqiearanoe and pretove 
the wood. The cod, dry 
days of faU are an kkal 
time for this activity. The 
job will enhance the 
beauty, usefulness, and 
value of your pmjpetty. It 
is also a fine contribution 
to community bcautiflca- 
tion and dvic pride. 

Plant dwarf varieties of 
annual flowers to use as 
house jdants this winter. 
Asto*. calendula, oetoda, 
marigold, ami zinnia are 
compact, colbrful species. 

Plant piqjer-white nar- 
cissus in stones in a bulb 
pan in mid-NovanbCT to 
have blooms at Christmas 
time. 

Add pine needle mulch 

Legals 

from page JO 

a.m., before thli Court at 
its courtroMU agafaut tlw 
paymoit and (kllvery of 
the Estate of Lydia B. 
lUqjer, Deceased to the 
dittributees and ^ateet 
ttoeof wfthoot requiriiv 
refunding bonds, aiul k is. 
ORDERED that this 
Ordo- be puUUwd (»oe a 
wedc fot two fucoHcive 
wedu fai the l^rgioia 
Beadk Sm, a ofw^ptfa 
pubUdied and navfaii a 
genffil dreidittkHi In the 
City of Virginia Beach. 

A Cktffy TeMe: 
J<^i V, Fmiw, Cbfk 
By: Raymond W. 
BjOTbnao, D.C. 

I aA for this: 
Berryman Orcen, IV, 
A^B^ fw tl» EMte of 
Lyiia B. fiopm, Daemmd 
1700 First VfafiiAi Bank 
Tomf 

101 St. Pnd'i Bonkimi 
NorfoHc, Vi. ^10 

9/36. 10/3 



to the rock garden to 
reduce erositm, conserve 
soil moisture, provide 
himus, and jnotect pimts 
from heaving out of the 
ground byWtiSiktmx^ 
ing and thawing during 
the winter. 

dps, and radishes in Mrly 
Sqxembe^ as the last 
oops in your fall garden. 
Sprinkle wter alcmg the 
rows to prranote germina- 
tion and growth of young 
seedlings. 

Roses may be i^anted 
this fall to be ready fm an 
early start next spring. 

Renew the mulch 
around perennials and 



plants on the first nights 
of frost. Oftm, if the 
tender plants can be pro- 
tected front thrflrst^ffly" 



roses. Use bark ot wood 
chii», sawdust, or peat' 
moss abcntt two inches' 

Spring flowering peren- fro^rth^.,will bloom for 

heartv gidllartHa, dayffly, 
peony, and primula may 
be divkled this month 

Gather dried flowers 
and seed pods of weeds 
and garden plants for use 
in winter arrangements in 
the home. 

I^dilia tubers may be 
lifted after the flrst killing 
frost a^d may be placed in 
storage for the winter. 

Have on hand some 
heavy papa, boxes, etc. to 
cover tender garden 



for all your 
Landscaping 

Plan and Beautify 
YourLayim 

LAWN AND GARDENING 
RENOVATIONS 

Gradbig • FerUHzliig , 
SMfHiig • Ptanting off Shrubs 
DMigns 

FREE ESTIMATES 

497-8906 



roRCOMPLnE 
UNMCAflNfi SERVICE 



AL 



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"A aama Viat you caa Uv9t 
tor part* amf aarWca av^MKHy" 

420-4220 

1792 S. Military Hwy. 
___J__ Chesapealu 



4 






•■.iii.-S|Ma. 
S87-44SI 





GARDEN CENTER 
^^ 1S06 E. LIttIa Cr«afc Raad 

Open Sunday 



HOLLAND FLOWER 
BULBS-JUST ARRIVED 
DCPANDED SELECTION 



.^'I^IS 



* Rnclilris •! 

AZALEA SPECIAL 

SmOLDNOLTNY 
ANDKAVn 








5 F<NI 

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ril^AiM 



m mw mm if an |p|pipp^^ 



8 



VWCIWA lEACH SUNDWEPNEgPAY.iErTEMBER M. HT> 



> 




Virgiiiia Beach 



1 



ta the Cterk's Office of 
iht Oicuit Court of the 
£Sty of Virgiiik Betth. on 
die 31st day of August, 
1979. 

William Fred Weeks. 
Plaintiff, against Gail 
Steinhilber Weeks. 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Tlw object of this suit is 
to olMain a divorce from 
Gail Steinhilber Weeks 
upon the grounds of the 
parties have lived separate 
and apart and without 
cohabitation and without 
mterruption for a period 
of more than one year. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
6427 Walther Avenue. 
Apartment E, Baltunore, 
Maryland 21206 it is 
ordered that Gail Stein- 
hilber Weeks do appear on 
or before the 23rd of 
October. 1979, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

Acopy-Teste: 
Philip E. Landrum 
Board of Trade Buildmg 
Norfolk, Virginia 

9/12. 9/19. 9/26. 10/3 



In the Gerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
aty of Virginia Beach, on 
the 28th day of August. 
1979. 

'\ 
Carl Ernest Mason, 
Plaintiff, against Aiuu 
Elizabeth \ Mason. 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The<H)jectofthissuitis 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of more than 
one year's separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the state of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
766 Ridge Drive, Mantua, 
New Jersey 080S1, it is 
ordered that Anna 
Elizabeth Mason do 
appear on or before the 
19th of October, 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Qerk 

J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Robert H. Bennett, p.q. 
3330 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

9/5.9/12.9/19.9/26 



Ann Meier and Paul John 
Mact to their children, 
Michael Paul Meier & 
Michelle mnm Meier. The 
consequences of 
termination of residual 
parental r^ts are that a 
parent or paroits forever 
relinquish all parental 
rights such as, but not 
limited to, the rights to 
companionship, associa- 
tion, religious training, 
education, discipline, 
guidance, maintenance 
and all decision making 
concerning the children's 
welfare. And further it is 
to conunit said infants to 
the care and custody of 
the Virginia Beach 
Department of Social 
Services with the right of 
said agency to consent to 
thie infants' adoption. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Patricia Ann Meier and 
Paul John Meier is a 
proper party to this 
proceeding: but due 
diligence has been used to 
asc tain in what county 
or corporation he or she 
is, without effect, it is 
ORDERED that Patricia 
Ann Meier and Paul John 
Meier do appear here 
within 10 days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her/his interest in 
this suit. 

A Copy Teste: 

Elizabeth E. Henley, 

aerk 

Kathy S. Brothers, D.C. 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 6th day of September, 
1979. 

Diane Dean Shelton, 
Plaintiff, against John 
Shawn Shelton, Defend- 
ant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant upon 
the grounds of one year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last know 
post office address being: 
c/o General Delivery, At- 
lanta, Georgia it is 
ordered that John Shawn 
Shelton do appear on or 
before the 30th of Octo- 
ber, 1979, and do what 
may be necessary to pro- 
tect his interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Frank E. Butler, III 
2420 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23454 « ^ 

9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
Ti^ CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THfi CITY OF 
VIRGIKUA BteAOr, ON 
THE 6TH DAY OF 
SEPTEMBER, 1979. 



In the aerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of tfie 
City of Virginia Beadi, on 
Jtbe6th day of September, 
1979. 



Carolyn Tucker, Va. 

Beach Dept. 

Petitioner of Social 

s^cei" 



In re: Adoption of Farah 
Ferdeen Alfad Abbas an 
infant under the age of 
fourteai (14) years, and 
Change of Name to Farah 
Alfad Atangan 

By: Lope V. Atangan and 
Nadira A. Atangan, Hus- 
band and Wife, Peti- 
tioners. 

ORDER 

This day came Lope V. 
Atangan and Nadira A. 
Atangan, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant(s), 
Farah Ferdeen Alfad 
Abbas, by Lope V. Atan- 
gan and Nadira A. Atan- 
gan. husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that 
Ferdausi Yahya Abbas, a 
natural parent of said 
child(ren), is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
c/o Zorayda Tamano, 30 
Bohol Avenue, Quezon 
Chy, Philippines. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Ferdausi 
Yahya Abbas appear 
before this Court within 
toi (10) days after publica- 
tion of this Order and 
indicate his/her attitude 
toward the proposed 
adoption, or othCTwise do 
what is necessary to pro- 
tect his into'est in this 
matter. 

A copy teste: 
John V. Foitress, dak 
By: Raymond W. 
Bjorkman, D. C. 

John D. Hooker, Jr. p.q. 
Post Office Box 6363 
Virginia Beach. VA 23456 

9/12, 9/19. 9/26. 10/3 



Juvenile & Domestic 

T5JJ- u ij c uu Relations District Court 
Jddi^arold S m it h . Mun icipal Center 
Plamtiff. agamst Donna 
Ann Powell Smith, De- 
fendant. 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 6th day of September, 
1979. 

Sandra P.jLe«iBV Plain- 
tiff, against Randall C. 
Lewis, Defendant. 



Va. Beach, Va. 23456 



9/5,9/12,9/19,9/26 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said Defendant, upon 
the grounds of one year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
Beacham's Apartments, 
Apt. 551, Jacksonville, 
North Carolina 28540 it is 
ordered that Donna Ann 
Powell Smith do appear 
on or before the 3()th of 
October, 1979, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Whiteman A. Sadler 
6330 Newtown Road 
Norfolk, Virginia 

9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3 



Virginia: In . the Clerk's 
Office of the Juvoiile and 
Domestic Relations 
IMstrict Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
27th day of August, 1979. 

Commonwealth of 
Virginia 

In re: Michael Paul Meier 
Michelle nmn Meier 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this 
proceeding is the 
tomination of the resdual 
pM^Mal righu of Patricia 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 27th day of August, 
1979. 

Horace J. Savage, 
Plaintiff, against Kay 
Linda Savage, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce from 
the bonds of matrimony 
from the said defendant, 
upon the grounds of 
continuous separation in 
excess of one year. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
216 Marion Ave., Carlisle, 
Pmnsylvania 17013, it is 
ordered that Kay Linda 
Savage do appear on or 
before the 25th of 
October, 1979, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 



Acopy-T«te: 

John V. Fentress. Clark 

Linda Nod Hill. D.C. 

Doumar, Pincus, Knight 

and Harlan, p.q. 

1350 Virginia National 

BankBkJ^. 

Norfolk, Va. 

9/5,9/12,9/19,9/26 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of one year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
451 West Broadway, 
Apartment 17, Eugene, 
Oregon it is ordered that 
Randall C. Lewis do 
appear on or before the 
30th of October, 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Michael Wayne Price 
6330 Newtown Road 
Norfolk, Virginia 23502 

9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 6th day of September, 
1979. 

Barbara Bradford Arm- 
brust. Plaintiff, against 
Leslie D. Armbrust, De- 
fendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Hie object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of one (1) 
year separation. 
And an affidavit having 
beoi made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 



post office address being 
Unknown it is otdend 
that Leslie D. Armbrust 
do appear on m before the 
3 1st of October, 1979, and 
do what may be necessary 
to protect his interest in 
this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Shames and Byrum 
2145 Old Greenbrier Road 
Chesapeake. Va. 

9/12.9/19.9/26.10/3 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Brach. on 
the 6th day of September. 
1979. 

Theodore Traylor, Jr., 
Plaintiff, against Queen 
Victoria Ramson Traylor, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of the parties 
having lived separate and 
apart without cohabita- 
tion and without interrup- 
tion for period in excess of 
one year. 
And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
1761 Clifton Avenue, 
Springfield, Ohio it is 
^^ord^ed that Queen Vie — 
toria RamsoQ Traylor do 
appi^^6^^iit iftf6rii m 
2nd of Novohber, 1979. 
and do wh^ may be 
necessary to pr o tec t he r ^ 
interest in this suit. 



In the Gtfk'i Offloe of 
tlw Ciiaiit Court of Qty 
of >%gink B«Kh on the 
18th day of Septenbert 
1979. 

Donna S. Turner, Pbun- 
tiff, against Jerry R. 
Tun^, Defoidant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a (fivorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendut, upon 
the grouiRls of otw year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
beoi made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resiitent of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office addeis begin 
c/o John Dewitt. 2418 
South Voss. Apt. 123, 
Houston, Texas, 770S7 it 
is ordered that Jerry R. 
Turner do appear (m or 
before the 16th of 
November, 1979, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress. Clerk 

By: Raymond W. 
Bjorkman, D.C. 

William F. Bumside 
P.O. Box 1062 
Vu-ginia Beach, Virginia 
23451 

9/26,10/3,10/10,10/17 



The object of this suit is 
fw the said plaintiff to 
obtidn a.divOTce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon ~ the 
grounds of (me year separ- 
ation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
,the defaidant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office being 1 1 Virgin 
Street, West Brownsville, 
Pennsylvania it is ordered 
that he do appear on or 
before the 9th of Novem- 
ber, 1979, and do what 
may be necessary to pro- 
tect his interest m this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

By: Raymond, W. 
Bjorkman, Deputy Clerk 

Mr. Forest A. Nester, 

Attorney. 

3432 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 

9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17 



A copy-Teste: 

Stuart R. Gordon, p.q. 
P.O. Box 2257 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23452 

9/12,9/19,9/26. 10/3 



In the Qerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beadi. on 
the 17th day of Sqrtan- 
ber. 1979. 

Mark A. Stets. Plamtiff, 
against Shirley L. Stets, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defaidant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office addms being 
1205 Easter Street Apt. 
#4, Jacksonville, Florida, 
32211 it is orckred that 
Shirley L. Stets do appear 
on or before the 12th of 
November, 1979, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest ui this 
suit. 

A cofqr-Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Gerk 

By: Raymond W. 
Bjorkman, D.C. 

William F. Burnside. p. q. 

P.O. Box 1062 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 

9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17 



iJL&nn .^k'l.OflSce of 

ih^J^iicuir Cm$il>tfim 
(^iy of Virginia liea^.' oh 
the 18th day of Sepusm- 
1*r.t979; — ' 

Stephen 0. Shockey, 
Plaintiff, against Patricia 
Ann Shockey, Defemlant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
' vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of one year 
separation, since June 8, 
1978. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defmdant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the kst known 
post office address being 
c/o Donna Ford ^^art- 
ment 6, 6127 I Avenue, 
National City, California, 
92050 it is ordered that 
Patricia Ann Shockey do 
apptat on tx before the 
16th of November, 1979. 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in diis sutt. 

A «q)y-Teste: 

John V.Feotress, Gerk 

By: Raymond W. 
Bjorkman, Deputy, Go-k. 

Glen B. McGanan 

425 South Witchduck Rd. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 

9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17 



In the Gerk's Office of 
tlK Grcuit Cmirt of the 
City of VirgUa Bea^, (ni 
the IM di^.of Stpiem' 
ber, 1979. 

Lou Ann Beil, Plaiirtiff , 
apdntt Henry Mdcfwd 
Bell. Ill, Defendant. 

ORDBROF 
PUBLICATION 



In the Gerk's Office of 
the Grcuit Court of the 
Gty of Virginia Beach, on 
the 19th day of Septem- 
ber, 1979. 

Teofik) P. Palabay, Jr., 
Plaintiff, against Vivenda 
Banayat Palabay, Defen- 
dant, 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 



The object of this^uit^ 
for^tte iaid"7flaintiff to 
obMlta* m9otte.V9biem> 
ma^rimcniii from Uie said' 
defendant, upon the 
groonds of oneyor sepsuf- 
ation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is ncK a 
resident of the Sute of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address bdng 
49 Gty Camp Baguio, 
Baguio City, Philippines it 
is ordered that she do 
appear on or before the 
9th of November. 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
hiterest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

John V. Fentress. Gerk 

By: Raymond 

Bjorkman. Deputy Gerk. 

Mr. Tom C. Smith, Atty. 
2604 Pacific Aoiue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

9/26, 10/3. 10/10, 10/17 



Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, 19124 it is ordered 
that Jama Francis Dowd 
do appear on or before the 
8th of November, 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to prdtect hn 
interest fai this suit. 

A copy-Teste: • 
John V. Fentress, Gerk 

By: Raymond W. 
Bjorkman, D. C. 

Tom C. Smith, p.q. 
2604 Pacific Avoiue 
Virghiia Beadi, Virginia 
23451 

9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

In Re: Estate of Jack 
Kennedy, deceased 

SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

It appearing that a, re- 
port of the accounts of J. 
Davis Reed, III Personal 
Representative of the Est- 
ate of Jack Kennedy, de- 
ceased, and of the debts 
and donands against his 
Estate has been fined in 
the Gerk's Office and six 
months have elapsed since 
the qualification, on mo- 
tion of Robert L. Simp- 
son, Jr., Administrator, 
d.b.n., it is ORDERED 
that the creditors of, and 
aU others mterested in, the 
Estate do show cause, if 
any they can, on t hej8th| 



li 



day of S^tembff, 1979, 

cpurt at. Its covmim^ 

a^unst the payment and 
delivCTy of the Estate of^ 
Jack Kennedy, decrased 
to the distributees thereof, 
with or without requiring 
refundmg bonds as the 
Court fiirther prescribes. 
The Gerk is directed to 
cause ttiis Order to be 
published once a week for 
two successive weeks in 
The Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general dr- 
culation and published in 
the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and the 
Gty of Norfolk, Virginia. 



A Copy Teste: 

John V. Fentress, Gerk 

By: Raymond W. Bjork- 
man, D.C. 

I ask for this: 

Robert L. Sbni»on, Jr. 

4530 Professional Grcle 

Pembroke Professional 

Park 

Virginia Beach, Va 23454 

9/19, 9/26 



In the Geric's Office of 
tlM Grcuit Court of the 
Gty of Virginia Beach, on 
the 13th day of Sep- 
tember, 1979. 

Martha Susan ColweU 
Dowd. Plaintiff, agaiiist 
James Francis Dowd, 
DdTendaBt. 

ORDER OF 
PUBUCATION 

Thc(Ajertofthbsaitis 
to obtakk a ^<Nce a 
vincuto ■latfnuMirii firon 
the said d^eadut, iqx» 
the grovads of oat yetf 
sqmdoa. 

Aad as aflUw^ hwta« 
heea madie md SM fkat 
dw dcfndnt is not a 
resideat <rf tfie Sme of 
Vlifi^ &MB last kaomi 
poA (rffice ad(^M b^ 
1119 Harrison Street. 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIR- 
OIMA BEACH 

Margaret Lynn Lassiter. 
Petitioner. 

'v» 

Lawrence Dale Wilson. 
St., DefeiKiant. | 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The ab^ of tlds Peti- 
titm is to chan pi the 
surnames of Jeffrey 
WUliam Wilson, Kara 
Lynn Wilson and Uw- 
rence Dale Wibon. Jr., 
cWidreaof thep«Won«. 
herdn and the defeacfamt. 
frMi "Wilson" to "Ubs- 
.iter." 



^mmmtm 



■■ 



l««imi9QV^H«lf9«^«««HHBVm 



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*■"««» 



BAYSlDEIOKOUGHt 

Virginia Betch Public NiMicM coat*4.*^ |r 

AoQl^Miioei^KmiqpfttaitfCMofLakeMmmiNort^ 9/19,9/26 



Ruth Hodges Smith 
aty Clerk 



An affidavit has been 
made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resi- 
dent of the State of Vir- 
ginla, his last known post 
office addras Iwfait die 
aty of Clearwater. State 
of Florida: and thtt Oc 
petitiona- has used due 
diligmce with no effe^ to 
ascertain tiw tocation of 
the defo^ant. 

It is ORDERED that 
this Order of Fut^xtkm 
be puUbhed once a wedc 
for four suooesrive wedcs 
in the Vii^nia Beach Sun. 
a newqN^Jcr pubUdied hi 
the City of Virginia 
Beach. Virginia. 

A Copy Teste: 

John V. Fentren. Clerk 

By: J. Curtis Fruit. D.C. 

I ask for this: 

Albert C. S^lkin, p.q. 
ISOO Virghiia National 
BankBuildfaig 
Norfolk. Viifinia 23510 

9/19. 9/26. 10/3, 10/10 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Orcuit Court of the 
City of Viqjnia Beadi, on 
the 12di day of Sep- 
tember. 1979. 



.Penny S. Kforeno, P^ifai- 
tiff. against Gilbert 
Marquez Mwoio, Defen- 
"^dant. 

ORDER OF 
— ^»UBUCATION 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE cm OF VIR- 
CUMA BEACH ON THE 
lOTH DAY Of SEP*- 
T&^Mm, 1979. 

Aldcn Lawrence Niduds, 
Conpiainant. vs Biliie J. 
Nidub. Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of the above 
8t)1ed suit is to partition 
real estate owned by the 
Conqdainant and Defm- 

dMtt and ftiOy described as 
fdlo«v: 

All that certain lot. piece 
or pared of tend, with tfie 
buildings and fanprove- 
mento timeon. situate, 
lying and bdng in tiw Ci^ 
of Vhihiia Beach. Vir- 
ginia, and known, num- 
boed and desjgnatad as 
Lot 37 in Uock 6 as shown 
(HI thiu certain plat en- 
titled "Subdivision of 
Windsor Woods, Section 
FtHir. for Uneberry Con- 
struction Corporation. 
Lynnhaven Borough. Vir- 
ginia Beach. Virginia", 
whkfa said idat is duly 
recorded k the Clerk's 
Offlce of the Circuit 
Court <^ the Qty of 
Vbiinia Beadi. Vuifaiia, 
in Map Bodt 66. U page 
4. Said deed is recorded in 
Deed Book 1096. irt pige 
S70. indicating ownership 
is vested in Aldm Law- 
rence Nidiols and BOIie J. 
Nichols, husband and 
wife. 

And it iqqiearing by the 
Affidavit filed atomling 
liw that BiDicr^^r" 



The dbjeetoftlfif suit Is!^ 

vincuk) nuoiinionll (final 
fmu the sidd 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of a one year 
separati<m. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
t^ drfendant is not a 
resident of tlw State of 
Virghiia, the tast known 
post office address bebig 
6311 Ccmistock Avenue, 
Aim. G, Whittier. CaU- 
fomia. 90602 it is ordered 
that Gilbert Marquez 
Moreno do tppar on w 
befnre the 7th of Novon- 
ber. 1979. and do what 
may be necessary to pro- 
tect his hiterest hi tjiis suit. 

A wpy-Ttitei 

Jdm V. Fentress. Cleric 



By: Raymond. 
BjOTkman. D.C- 



Wi. I ask for this: 



Inc., fctf a dHHit* vf Ztirtnt WtOkt 
from B<2 doMm«^iyi>lu«i^t District to A-2 
Apartmoit District mi oeit^ prapnty locaMd <m the 
North dda of Ha^wUit Line be^mfait « a polot 310 
feet West of Shuiney Laae. nrantag a (Uftanoe <rf 163.34 
feet doQ tteNorth sidt of Hi^^Ure Lue. rmoing a 
dtejUiteor of 130 feet along the Western tnpmf Unc. 
runiriag a diriaace at 163 feet idoag the Nofthem 
pn^ierty Ibie and ruaidng a distance of 130 fiet ^>ag 
the Eastera property Hne. Said pircd contains .33 aoe. 
BAYSlDEBOtOUGH. 

3. 

An Ordinance upon ^pUoation of Lake Edwd 
North. .Inc.. for a CbMil* •t Zoning D|Mrlct 
aas s ma U fcw ftmn A-2 i^iartnttnt Dirtrlct to B-2 
Community-Buslnen District cm certidn propnty 
located cm the Sbuth side of Hampshhe Lane beginning 
at a point 591.61 feet But of Baker Roid. ninafaig a 
distance &t 1239.13 feet dcM« the South side of 
Hanqishlre Lane, ronnhig a disiaaoe of 170.33 fsst in an 
Eutafy directkm. nmnliii a dManoe of 222 feet bi a 
Nordierly (Ure^lon. rumilim a #rtanoe of 196.35 feet in 
an ^sterly dfawtlon. runnfaw a distance of 17i0.07 feet 
fai a NotdNrly drectiott. rumyng a dtrtuoe at 325 feet 
hi an EltM«4y directlott, running a distance of 100 feet 
along the West sideof Shurmy Lane, running a distance 
of 235 feet In a WeMcriy dhedkm. nmalng a distance of 
475 feet fai a Southerly directkm, rumrinf a distance of 
13S1,67 feet akmg the West dde of Newtown Road, 
rumdng a distance of 250 feet In a Northwesterly 
dfaectlon. running a distance of 70 feet In a Nbrtiieriy 
dfaiection and nm^ a distance of 250 feet In a 
Northwester directkm. Sakl pared coitfahts 13.3 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUCHi. 



An Ordhianoe upop >^^|riicatlon of Viqinia De Castro, 
Manudito O. Ctdayo and Ma. Aurora V. Calayo tat a 
Cia^ of ZMii« DIslifct nwdflrartan fhai 1-2 
Heavy Industrial District to B-2 Coramunlty-Bi^nen 
District on certidn tnpeity kxated at the Northwest 
intersectton of Northampton Boulevard and Burum 
Station Road, runnhig a distance of 44.01 fed ak«g the 
West dde of Nrnthanqiiton Boulevard, rumikig a 
distance of 278.40 feet in a Northwestcriy dhe^^. 
rumdng a distance of 75 fed hi a Northeasterly 
direction, rumdng a didanoe ot 416.30 fed In a 
Northwederiy direction, running a distance of 233.57 
fed hi a So u tiw re stetl y dfaedlon. runntaif a distttwe of 
536.44 fed fai a Southeasttify direction, and runnfaig a 
distance of 203.41 fed akmg the North dde of Bwton 
Statk>n Road. Sakl pared contafais 4.168 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 



In the Clerk's Office of 
th« Circuit Court of the 
City of VirguUa Beadi. on 
the 21d day of September. 
1979. 

Janice Eileen Gaddy. 
^fadatlff . ifdnd Marvill 
Gaddy. Sr.. Defendant. 

ORI^ROT 
PUBLICATION 

The objed of this suit is 
to obtahi a divoice a 
mcnuet thwo. to be later 
merged faito a divorce a 
vfaKub matrimonii at the' 
oqdratkm of one year's 
separation frmn the said 
defendant upon the 
grounds of desotion. 

And an affidavit having 
been nuule and filed that 
the defmdant is not a 
reddem of Uie State of 
Virguda. the last known 
post office address beuig 
127 Path Ffaider Middle- 
town, Peoosylvama it is 
ordered that Marvill 
Gaddy. Sr. do appeu on 
OT before the 16th of 
Novembo-, 1979, and do 
mbat may be necessary to 
proted his faltered bi thi' 
suit. 



VIRCtNU BI^CH SUNOWEDNESPAY, SEPTEMBER 26. 1979 9 



the West side of Sandbridge Road, runnfaig a distance of 
14W feet in a Northwesto-ly direction, runnfaig a 
diMance of 500 feet ui a Southwesterly direction, 
runnfaig a distance of 220 feet tai a Northwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 130 feet in a 
Northeasteriy directkm. runnfaig a dbtanoe of 440 feet 
in a Southwesterly direction, runnfaig a diuanoe of 120 
feet in a WeMerly dfarectkm and runnfaig a distance of 
150 feet in a Northvrasteriy dfaectkm. Said parcel 
contains 240 acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 



Vfagfaiia. The pubUc is 
faivtod to attoid. Man 
detailed fatformatfon is 
andteble in the Dq>art- 
ment of Pbuinfaig. 

Ritth Hodges Smith 
atyQffk 

9/26, 10/3 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Orcuit Omrt of the 
City of Vfagfaua Beadi. on 
the 2l8t day of Sqitember. 
1979. 

Betty 0. Weaver, Pbdn- 
tiff, agafaist Harold A. 

tiff, agafaut Haiokl A. 
Weaver. Defendant. 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 



A copy-Teste: 
J<dm V. Fentress 
By: Lfaida Nod 
Deputy Clerk. 



HIQ. 



Berg and Qonkm. p.q. 
2953 Vkgfaik Beach Blvd. 
Virgfaila Beadi. Va. 

9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17 



to 

dent of this «ate or tfshe 
is, her utoeabouts are 
unknown, it Is tfioefore 
ORDERED that the saU 
BOUe I. Mcfaols do appear 
cm or befme the 8 day of 
November. 1979. fai the 
Cleric's Office of the 
Court and do i^at ii 
necessary to proted her 
faltered. 

And it is further 
ORDERED that the Order 
by puidMied <Mwe a wedc 
for four succesdve wcdn 
fai tiw Newspaper, printed 
fai tiw City of Vlrgfaiia 
Beach. Vfagtaila and ^ 
newqnqwr prescribed ify 
our sakl Cfa^t Court.' 

A Copy-Teste: 

Jdm V. Fentress, deric 

By:UndaNodHiOD.C. 



The object of this suit is 
to obtain a div(Hm a 
vincuk) matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertwn. 

And an affidavit havuig 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virguiia, the lad known 
post office adtkess being 
^43 NorUi ^whOT Aver^ 




J(rtm K. ^foore, p.q. 
35th St. St Pacific Avenue 
Vfaifaiia Beadi. Va 23451 

9/19. 9/26. 10/3. 10/10 



Robed R. Outer, p.q. 
120ra I^Mrrow Road 
Chesapeake, Var29^ 

9/19. 9/26. 10/3, 10/10 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



Vfagfaifai: 



The r^dar nwe^ of the Coundl of Vtafi^ Beach 
will be hdd tai the Coundl Chambers of the 
Adadiddratioa BuUdfaig. Oty Hal. PrinecN Amw 
Station, Vfagtaila Beach, Vfagfada on Monday October 8, 
19^, at 2HiO p.m., d iriikdi tfane tte ftritowing 
iq^Ucatkins will be heard: 

CHANGEOrZONINGDinBICTCLAaVICAnON: 
I.YNNHAVEN BOBOUGH: 

1. 

An Oidfaiance upon Appttcation of Ihomas S. and 
Ktergard K. Mooie for a CImmp af JSaiBii OMrtd 
CtaiilllMlM from O-l Offiet Dtelrfat to B-2 
Conmnnl^-Bitthwis Diitrid on certatai propmy 
bcated on the Nortii dde at Soutii Lynnhaven Road 
Mihmfatt at a potat UjO feat man m km Wast of 
lywihairm Pwfcwir, nmitaig a dliMwt «r 19f feet 
alo^ tiw Noitii dde of Soutii Lynnhaven Road, 
maatav a mmm «r 130 fad akmt tiw WMan 
pr^arty toe, twahit a di^aoa of IMJ fed rio^tte 
rteftiwia pwpeivlta* •«» runrfai a dhtaw* «rf l» 
feet along tiw Eaden propuqp Baib Sdd pared 
1 .417 ac«. LYieWAVBN B<»IWIH. 



^ofi^loi:^. 
fttMa R-5 
Reridential Distrid to A-1 Apartment District on 
certtmt property located on tiw South skle of Mooics 
PotuI Road b^nidng d a pdnt 1565 fed East of teker 
Road, runnfaig a didanoe ai 1190 fed akmg the Soutii 
side of Moores PotmI Road, rumdng a (fistance of 
355.60 fed aku^ the Eastern prqiwrty Hne. runni^ a 
distance of 1290.88 fed akmg tiw Southern property 
line and runnfaig a didance of 262.&2 feet akmg tiw 
Western pnqwrty Ifaw. Sdd pvcd contafaw 10.154 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

6. 

An Ordinance upon Anilica^ of Stafford Pnverties, 
Inc., fOT a Chaagc af Tealag Dislrid nasdnidlaa 
from R-8 Rcsklential Distrid to A-2 >Mpartmait Di^lct 
on bcrtafai pn^wrty ktcated on the Ead dde of Pleasure 
HoMe Road begbufaig at a pcM 7A% ttet Soath ot 
Nwtii CheeaweD Road, runnfaig a distance of 20 feet 
akmg the Ettt dde of Pkaswe House Road, runnfaig a 
distance of 300 fed more ot less akmg tiw Soutiwm 
imvedy Ifaw. ramdiig a didanoe of 150 fed mOTe or leo 
ak»n8 tiw Eadem propoty ifaw. runnfaig a distance of 80 
fed man ot less tiooi the Nortton property lfaw.ii 
numfaig a (btanoe of 135 fed fai a Sottherty dfawdkm 
and rumdng a ifistanoe of 200 fed more ot less la a 
Westei^r dmction. Sakl pared eoatdns 1.005 acre. 
BAYSIDE B0RCXK3H. 

7. 

An OrdfaianM upon ^ipUcation of Vfagl^ Ndkmal 
Bank fOTartaini of Zddm Mldd diadflcallaa 
fiom R-5 Rcddeatial Distiid to I-l Light ladustiid 
Distrid cm eadi^ ptcpmy kxafed o« tte Bad dde of 
Hodgman Road begfaiafaig at a pdat 645.80 fed Soutii 
of Shdl Road, nmnfaig a distance of 512 fed akmg the 
Bm dde of Hodgma Road, rumdng a dteaace of 
736.R ttet d«ig the Southern property Uae. runnfa^a 
dtoance <rf 555.20 fed ak»ig tiw Eastern pnver^ Ifaw 
and ruming a distance of 536.57 feet akmg the 
Northern prt^ierty line. Sakl pared cratafau 7.434 
acKs. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

CONDinONAt USE PEBMlTt 

BAYSIDE BOBOIK»: 



NOnCBOF 
PUBLIC HEARING 



public hearing concerning 
adoptk>n of the Proposed 
Coovrdwnsive Pfau on 
Monday, October 15, 
1979. at 2:00 p.m., fai tiw 
Owndl Chambers of tiw 
Admfadstratkm Bulldfaig. 
Princess Anne Court- 
house.. Vlrgfada Beach, 



protect his interest fai this 
suit. 



A copy-Teste: 
John V. Fentress 
By: Lfaida Nod 
Deimty Clerk. 



Hin. 



9/26.10/3. 10/10.10/17 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



Vfargfaua: 



The regukur meding of the Council of Virgfaua Beach 
will be held in the Council Chambers of the 
Administratkm Buildtaig, Oty Hall, Princess Anne 
Statkm. Vfagfaua Beadi, Vfa-ginia on Monday October 
15, 1979, at 2:00 p.m., at which time the following 
applkatkms will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISimcrCLASSIflCAIION: 



LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 



1. 



An OnUnanoe upon Application of Lyle G. uid Eunice 
M. Womnrs for a Cha^e of Zoning DIstrtet 
naadfkartaa tt<m R-5 Reddential District to O-l 
Ottka Distrkt on certaui im^wrty tocated at the 
NOTtheast faitersection of SoiHh Lynnhaven Road and 
Ptltdiard Road, running a distance of 146.18 feet atong 
tiw hkirth skle of Smith Lynnhavoi Road, runnfaig a 
(Sdmice of 292 feet drag the Easton property hne, 
nmntai a dtetance of 144 feet akmg the NOTthon 
Vtapattf ttae and runnfaig a distance of 258 feet akmg 
the EaM dde of Pritdwrd Road. Said pared contafais .9 
acre. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CONOmON AL USE PERMIT: 



3. 

An Ordinance upon Api^ication of Sandbridge Road 
Enterprises, a Partnership, fOT a C oa dHto ad Use 
Pcnait fOT a golf course oti eertdn property tocated on 
Uie East side of Atwoodtown Road begfamfa^ at a pofait 
7S0 feet East of the intersectum with Lotus Drive, 
runnfaig a distance of 629.05 feet dong the East skk of 
Atwoodtown Ro«l. running a distance of 150 ftet fai an 



CHANGE OF ZONING DtSTRKTCLASSDICAIION: 



PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 



An Orduumce upon Api^cation of Herman C. and 
Francis J. Jehoich for a Change of aEoaiag Dlstikt 
Oassiflcatfoa from AO-1 Agriculturd District to B-2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
located on the West side of Oceana Boulevard beginnfaig 
at a point 780 fcA more or less North of Prosperity 
Road, running a distance of 212 feet dong the West side 
of Oceana Boulevard, running a distance of 201 .68 feet 
dong the Northern property line, nmning a distance of 
212 feet dong the Western property line and running a 
distance of 201 .68 feet dong the Southern properly luie. 
Sdd parcel contains 1 acre. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

5. 

An Ordinance upon ^plication of Lorraine P. 
Godfrey and John A. Johnson Company, Inc., for a 
Coaditiond Use Penait for retail sales of garden 
supplies, equipmoit, and materid, as a subsidiary use to 
a plant nursery on certdn property located on the South 
side of Landstown Road beginning at a pobit 73S feet 
East of Princess Anne Road, running a distance of 
201.82 feet dong the South side of Landstown Road, 
running a distance of 533.3 feet dong the Eastern 
property line and running a distance of 497 feet dong 
the Western property luie. Said pared contains 1.3 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 



Port Humane. Cal^rnla^ 
fa is OTdered thd Har^ 
A. Weaver do appear on 
or befOTe the 16th of 
HwGoundl of the Oty of NovaBbe'r1979, and do 
Vfagfada Beach will hold a what may be necessary to 



An-Or^nanee'Upon Apfdieation of W. R. Mdbon, Jr., 
aa»il^Mj-^albo»ffl^fViBi|^iiBd,U<al'<ndt for a 
borrow pk on certafai ivopoty located 530 feet 
South of Old Dam Neck Road begfainfaig at a point 1300 
leet more or lew East oF Dwyw Hoad, running a 
distance of 637.76 feet in a Southwesterly dfa-ection, 
running a distance of 645.40 feet fai a Northwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 1009.57 feet ui a 
Southwesterly direction, runnfaig a distance of 505.18 
feet in a Southerly dfaection, running a distance of 
1066.05 feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a 
distance of 1721 .08 fett in a Northeasterly direction and 
runnfaig a distance of 810.18 feet fai a Nortiiwesterly 
direction. Sdd pared contafais 49.15 acres.PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

BLACKWATER BOROUGH: 

7. 

An ordinance upon ^plication of Archie G. and Elfai 
C. Silverhome for a Coadttknud Use Penait for a home 
occupation (beauty parior) on cotain property located 
at the Southwest faitersection of Land of Promise Road 
and Biackwater Road, running a distance of 290.46 feet 
dOTig the South side of Land of Promise Road, running 
a distance of 208.5 feet atong the Western property line, 
runnii^' a distance of 3^10.5 feet dong the Southern 
propmy line and runnfaig a distance of 208.88 feet 
dong the West dde of Blackvrater Road. Sdd pared 
^xmtdns 1 .45 acres. BLACKWATER BOROUGH. 



AMENDMENT: 



8. 



An (MtaMce i9on Appttcdkm at imam M. ft Karea 
M. AnrimM aad Hdben B. and Deborah T. Davis fOT a 
CatiMfiaal Use Hmk tot dmw <tewt^ aalvity on 
ostata propMir loowd on ibe Nortli dde of Ocean 
View Aveaae bagtadag at a pobit 290 jfaet West of 
MortOBs Road, naakig a diataaoa of ^ feet dong tiw 
North dde (tf Oceu Vkm Avenue. rva^i« a tfstaaoa 
of 100 feet fai a Norths dhaetfoii. rwmfais a didanoe 
of :^ fed fai a Wcderiy «cactioi^ laaaiiv a didance ctf 
150 fad la a Nflrtheilr dfaait^oeb nmrii« a dinaacc of 
50 feet akmf the Noftha^fNp«9 Haa Md naafaig a 
tfstaaoe ta 2M fed deog tiw batara proper^ line. 
SaU pard eoatdas .23 acre. BAYSDB BCMUXX2H. 

Ptatt wkh aMMC detdiad laf orm^on M« aviAMc fai the 



PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 



An C^iUnanoe uprai ^qrikatkm of Sandbridge Road 
Ei^nidses, a Partiwrship, fOT a, Caa d ittoad Uae 
Parmdl tat a gdf course on certdn ptopaty kiatted on 
the E^ dde (rf Atwoodtown Road b^faufaig at a pOTut 
750 fed Eati of tiw faitose^km with Lotin Drive, 
ruaalag a Maace of 629.05 feet i^mg tiw E«a dde of 
Atwootfaomi Ro«l, running a cUstance of ISO fed in an 
Bmtmtf dtacdkm. running a di^amw of 1210 feet in a 
Noftharfy (flrectfOTi, runnfaig a distance of 390 in a 
Soberly (Ureokm. r\uinfaig a distant of 510 feet fai an 
BM«ly (Hredk», run^ng a distance of 700 f(M fai a 
Sovtfwi^ ^«ctkm, runiring a tUstuOT (M' 110 fe« fai a 
Weda^ Afeetkm. ruimtaig a (Muwe of 450 feet fai a 
SoMheify (ttractitm, ruimi^ a distuce of MO feet in an 
&Hl^ tteedon, rua^ag a itorace of 900 feet akmg 



Motion of the Pbuining COTnmisdOTi of the Oty of 
Vfagfaiia Beach to ameiKl and reorddn Artwle 2, Section 
229 of the Comprdwnnve Zonfaig Ordinance potdning 
to home oecupatk>ns. More detailed faiformation is 
avaifad>le fai the Department of Planning. 

9. 

Motion of the Pfaumfaig COTumissOTis m the Oty of 
Virguiui Beach to amend and reordain Article 9, 
Sections 911 and 921 of the CorajM-dmidve Zonfaig 
Ordfauuice potafaiing to use r^ulations for autmnc^Ue 
rqwlr establishments. More detaitod informatiOTi is 
avdUd>le in the Department of Pfauming. 

Plats with more detaitod faiformation are availabk fai the 
Dqwrtment of Pfauinfaig. 

Ruth Hodges Smitii 
OtyCtok 

9/26,10/3 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 

The Viifinia Bndi Pfaumfaig OmunisdOTi wffl bold a 
PuUk Heari^ m Hwadi^. Oetobs 9. 1979, u HMO 
Nowi in tte O^idl OMmabcrs <rf the Admi i iiahad oB 
ftiflO^ Nwxn Amw C(Mirthoae» Vtrgfatia Baach 
Virvnia. PLAI^IING COMMIS^ON ACTO)N IS 
NOT A FINAL DETERMINATION OP THE 



^tmi 



<!!,»*«« 



%.4imm>m^i^mmm^vminnrmmmwmmm'^mm^mmmm m •■ 



10 VIRGINIA BEACH SUND WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 26, 1979 



% 




Inia Beach Public Notices cont'd. 



SSSS Department of Planning. 



BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 



CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSMCATION: 17. 



APPLICATION. BUT ONLY A 

RECOMMENDATION TO THE CITY COUNCIL AS 
THE VIEWPOINT OF THE PLANNING 
COMMISSION. FINAL DETERMINATION OF THE 
APPLICATION IS TO BE MADE BY CITY 
COUNCIL AT A LATER DATE. AFTER PUBLIC 
NOTICE IN A NEWSPAPER HAVING GENERAL 
CIRCULATION WITHIN THE CITY. The following 
applications will appear on the agenda: 

REFERRED BACK TO PLANNING COMMISSION 
BY CITY COUNCIL ON SEPTEMBER 10, 1979: 

1. 

Motion of the Planning Commission of the City pf 
Virginia Beach to amend and reordain Article 6, Section 
601 of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to garage apartments in the A-l Apartment District. 
More detailed information is available in the 
Department of Planning. 

DEFERRED FOR 60 DAYS BY PLANNING 
COMMISSION ON AUGUST 14, 1979: 

,2. ' 

Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach to amend and reordain Article 1. Section 
1 11 of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to the definition of Dwelling Units. More detailed 
information is available in the Department of Planning. 

3. 

Subdivision Variance: Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to certain elements of 
the Subdivision Ordinance, Subdivision for West 
Landing Road Ltd. Property located on the South side 
of West Landing Road, 3850 feet more or less of West 
Neck Road. More detailed information is available in 
the Department of Planning. 

4. 

An Ordinance upon Application of West Landing 
Road, Ltd., for a Conditional Use Permit for one 
family detached dwellings on certain property located 
on the South side of West Landing Road beginning at a 
point 3850 feet more or less West of West Neck Road, 
running a distance of 1906.59 feet along the South side 
of West Landing Road, running a distance of 721.49 
feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 
1806.22 feet in a Southwesterly direction, running a 
distance of 1271.76 feet in a Southeasterly direction, 
running a distance of 947.49 feet in a Southwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 482.90 feet in a Easterly 
direction, running a distance of 42.72 feet in a Southerly 
direciion,^ running * distance 0f"r449.73 feet in a" 
Northeasterly direction, running a distance of 940.91 
feet in a Southeasterly direction running a distance of 
719.02 feet in a Northeasterly direction, running a 
distance of 237.21 feet in a Northerly direction, runniiig 
-,,-a-distance of 177;78 teet in an Easterly direction, 
running a distance of 192.40 feet in a Northerly 
direction, running a distance of 1246.95 feet in a 
Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 663.18 
feet in a Northerly direection, running a distance of 
441.19 feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a 
distance of 170 feet in a Westerly direcetion and running 
a distance of 726 feet in a Northerly direction. Said 
parcel contains 194.5 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 



An Ordinance upon Application of Arthur A. and 
Conchita A. Dy for a ChMge of Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 Residential District to B-2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
located on the East side of Princess Anne Road 
beginning at a point 1000 feet more or less South of 
Providence Road, running a distance of 277.9 feet along 
the East side of Princess Anne Road, running a distance 
of 185.03 feet along the Southern property line, running 
a distance of 277,9 feet along the Eastern property line 
and running a distance of 185.03 feet along the 
Northern property line. Said parcel contains 1.1 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

10. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Dr. Ronald J. Wyles 
for Change of Zoning District Ciassiflcation fron|, R-4 
Residential District to O-l Office District on certain 
property located at the Northeast intersection .of First 
Colonial Road and Mill Dam Road, running a distance 
of 300 feet along the East side of Mill Dam Road, 
running around a curve In a Southeasterly direction a 
distance of 115.61 feet, running a distance of 485 feet 
along the West side of Mill Dam Court, running a 
distance of 45.99 feet in a Southwesterly direction, and 
running a distance of 370 feet along the North side of 
First Colonial Road. Said parcel contains 1.844 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

11. 

An Ordinance upon Application of The Barberton 
Corporation for a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from A-i Apartment District to A-3 
Apartment District on certain property located on the 
West side of Barberton Drive beginning at a point 35 
feet North of C Street, running a distance of 105 feet 
along the West side of Barberton Drive, running a 
distance of 125 feet along the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 105 feet aloffg the Western 
property line and running a distance of 125 feet along 
the Southern property line! Said parcel contains .301 
acre. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

12. : 

An Ordinance upon Application of The Barberton 
Corporation for a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 Residential District to A-3 
Apartment District on certain property located at the 
Northwest comer of Barberton Drive and C Street, 
running a distance of 35 feet along the West side of 
Barberton Drive, running a distance of 125 feet in a 
Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 90 feet in 
a Northeasteriy direction, running i^distance of 105 feet 
=in^44ortliwes(a4y^treetton. ninning a distance of 125 
feet -along the Western property line and running a 
distahce of 230 feet along the North Sltfe of»C Street. 
Said rparool contains ':402 acre. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 



An Ordinance upon Amplication of Mr. and Mn. 
Emanuel Oavallas for a ChM^c of Zmitaii IN^kt 
Cb^flcatimi from R-S Rnidential I^trict to B-2 
Community-Business Diitrict on certain i^operty 
located on the North side'of Shore Mve begfannini at a 
point 820 feet West of Pleasure House Road, running a 
distance of 135 feet along the North side of Shore Drive, 
nmnitig a dtstantt of 175 feet aloqg tht Western 
property line, running a disunce of 133 feet ^ng the 
Northern propoty line and running a distance of 173 
feet along the Easton property line. Said pvacel 
contains .34 acre. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

18. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Virgiaia Ymtives, 
Inc., a Virginia Coiporation, for a C^aagc of Zonlii 
District Cianification from R-3 Residential District to 
A-3 Apartment District on certaui pn^erty located on 
the West side of South Oriole Drive beginning at a point 
327.88 feet South of Lasldn Road, running a distance of 
330.44 feet along the West side of Sot^tli Oriole Dri^, 
running a distance of 409.60 feet along tN Southern 
property line, running a distance of 227.06 feet along 
the Western property line and running a distance of 330 
feet along the NorthoTi property lim. Said parcel 
contains 2.43 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

19. 

An Ordinance upon A|>pUcation of OtFord, Limited 
for a Change of Zoiiliig District Oasrificalloa from R-3 
Residential District to R-8 Residential Dbtrict on 
certain property located 1870 feet North of Newtown 
Road beginning at a poin^ 730 feet more or less West of 
the Northern extremity of Broad Meildows Boulevard, 
running a distance of 1494.36 feet along the Southern 
property line, running a distance of 2'?19.6] feet along 
the Eastern property line, running a distance of 367 feet 
along the Northern property line uid running a distance 
of 3297 feet along the Westnn property line. Said 
parcel contains 74.62 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

20. 

An Ordinance upon Appliouion of Bradford I. and 
Julie A. WiUiams for a CowUtiond Use Paonlt for 
boarding horses on certain property located on the 
South side of Malbon Road beginning at a point 1330 
feet East of Princess Anne Road, numinga a distance of 
900 feet more or less along the South side of Malboa 
Road, running a distance of 650 feet along the Eutem 
property line, running a distance of 696.09 feet akmg 
the Southern property line and running a distance of 
520.1 feet along the Western property line. Said pared 
contains 9.1 1 aa«s. PUNGO BOROUGH. 



in a Southeasto-ly ifirecdcMi, running a distance of 
1721 .M feet in a Northwesto-ly direction and running a 
distance of 810.18 feet In a Northwesterly direction. 
Said parcel contains 49.15 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

26. 

An Ordinance upon An^lication of George Holmes for 
a Coadltfonal Use Pcnnit for a home for the aged on 
certain property located at the Northeast coma- of 
Bonney Road and Budding Avenue, ranning a distance 
of 233.62 feet along the North side of Bonney Road, 
running a distance of 254.30 feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a distant of 240 feet akmg the 
Northern property line and running a distance of 271 .33 
feet along the East side of Budding Avenue. Said parcel 
contains 1 .3 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

27. • 

An Ordinance upon Application of Edwin H. Weitzen, 
M.D., for a Conditional Use Permit for dune disturbing 
activity on certain property located on the East side of 
Sandfiddler Road beginning at a point 260 feet North of 
White Cap Lane, running a distance of 80 feet along the 
East side of Sandfiddler Road, running a distance of 
300 feet along the Northem property line, mnning a 
distance of 80 feet along the Eastern property line and 
ruiuiing a distance of 300 feet along the Southern 
jproperty line. Said parcel contains .5 acre. PUNGO 
BOROUGH. 

STREET CLOSURE: 

28. 

Application of Arista Associates for the discontinuance, 
dosiire and abandonmoit of a 20 foot lane located 
between 27th adn 28th Street, beginning at a point 300 
feet East of Arctic Avenue and running in an Easterly 
direction a distance of 84.03 feet. Said parcel contains 
1680 square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information on the above 
applications are available in the Department of 
Planning. 

All intennted persons are invited to attend. 

Robert J. Scott 
Director of Planning 

9/26,10/3 



1 



5. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Sir Galahad 
Company, a Virginia General Partnership, for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a community center on 
certain property located on the East side of Holland 
Road beginning at a point 200 feet more or less North of 
Landstown Road, running a distance of 812.25 feet 
along the East side of Holland Road, running a distance 
of 253.44 feet in an Easterly direction, running a 
distance of 309.52 feet in a Northerly direction, mnning 
a distance of 445.58 feet in an Easterly direction, 
running around a curve in a Southeasterly direction a 
distance of 475.08 feet, running a distance of 983.11 feet 
in a Southwesterly direction and running a distance of 
100 feet in a Northwesterly direction. Said parcel 
contains 13.746 acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 



13. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Smiley Chow for a 
Change of Zontaig District Oassiflcation from I-l Light 
Industrial District to B-3 Central-Business District on 
certain property located at the Southeast comer of 
Lynnhaven Parkway and Potters Road, ranning a 
distance of 1184.98 feet along the South side of Potters 
Road, running a distance of 74.16 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction, ranning a distance of 104.86 
feet in a Southwesteriy direction, ranning a distance of 
388.92 feet in a Southerly direction, ranning a distance 
of 695.76 feet in a Southwesterly direction,^nning a 
distance of 252.86 feet in a Northwesterijr direction, 
ranning a distance of 188.20 feet in a Southwesteriy 
direction and ranning a distance of 395.44 feet along the 
East side of Lynnhaven Parkway. Said parcel contains 
1 1 .4 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 



21. 

An Ordinance upon Applkation for Senwall 
Enterprises. Inc. . for a CMdiHoaai Uit l^iMM Ibif O^ 
disturbing activity on certain proporty located on the 
South^iite^ Ocean View Avenue, bejinilihg at a pouit 



14. 



6. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Robert Letchworth 
for a Change of Zoning District Classification from R-7 
Residential District to A-2 Apartment District on 
certain property located at the Northwest intersection of 
Winston Salem Avenue and Mediterranean Avenue, 
running a distance of 200 feet along the West side of 
Mediterranean Avenue, running a distance of 75 feet 
along the South side of Terrace Avenue, running a 
distance of 200 feet along the Western property line and 
running a distance of 75 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel contains .344 acre. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. ^ 

REGULAR AGENDA: 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 



Subdivision Variance: Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to certain elements of 
the Subdivision Ordinance, Subdivision for Seawell 
Enterprises, Inc. Property located on the South side of 
Ocean View Avenue, and is known as Lot 20, Block 17, 
Chesapeake Park. Plats with more detailed information 
are available in the Department of Planning. 

8. r- 

Subdivision Variaace: Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative OfTiars in regard to certain elements of 
the Subdivision Ordinann, Subdivision for Edmond L. 
Baker. Property located on the North side of Normandy 
Avenue, 520 feet East of Avalon Avenue. Plats with 
more detailed information are available in the 



An Ordinance upon Application of Smiley Chow for a 
Change of Zoning District Ctassification from O-I 
Office District to B-3 Central-Business District on 
certain property located at the Northeast corner of 
Lynnhaven Parkway and Potters Road, running a 
distance of 1073.92 feet along the North side of Potters 
Road, ranning a distance of 103.92 feet in a 
Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 251.67 
feet in a Northeasteriy direction, ranning a distance of 
1042.86 feet along the Northem property line and 
ranning a distance of 416.08 feet along the East side of 
Lynnhaven Parkway. Said parcel contains 7.4 acres 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

15. 

An Ordinance upon Appliation of Rufus S. and Norma 
F. Jordon for a Change of Zoning District 
aassificadon from R-5 Residential District to B-2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
located at the Northwest comer of Salem Road and 
Recreation Drive, ranning a distance of 180.64 feet 
along the West side of Salem Road, ranning a distance 
of 192.33 feet along the Northern property line, running 
a distance of 178.24 feet along the Western property line 
and ranning a distance of 168.42 feet along the North 
side of Recreation Drive. Said parcel contains .3 acre 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

16. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Mr. and Mrs. 

Emanuel GavaUas for a Chaa^ of Zoning Dbtrict 

Ctassificadon from R-5 to A-2 Apartment District on 

certain property located on the North side of Shore 

Drive banning at a point 770 feet West of Pleasure 

House Road, ranning a distance of 50 feet along the 

North side of Shore Drive, ranning a distance of 175 

feet in a Northerly direction, ranning a distance of 135 

feet in a Westerly direection, running a distance of 

254.50 feet in a Northerly dir«:etion. ranning a distance 

of 132.1 feet in a Northouto'ly direction, running a 

distance of 157.70 fed in a Southouterly direction and 

running a distance of 449.33 feet along the Eastern 

property line. Said paracel contains 1.5 acres. 



20 feet East of the ChesapeaJke Bay Bridge Twuid, 
ranning a distance of 74.63 feet along the Soudi aide of 
Ocean View Avenue, running a distance of 100 feet 
along the Western property line, running a dlstuce of 
100 feet along the Southern property line, and ranning a 
distance of 80 feet along the Eastern property tine, and 
ranning a distance of 80 feet along the Eastern property 
line. Said parcel is known as Lot 20; Block 17, 
Chesapeake Park and contains .17 acre. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

22. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Cox Cable of 
Tidewater for a Conditional Use Pcmit for a cable 
television tower on certain property located on the West 
side of Phillip Avenue b^inning at a point 120 feet 
South of Laskin Road, running a (^stance of 149.40 feet 
along the West side of Phillip Avenue, running a 
distance of 117 feet along the Southern {M-oporty line, 
ranning a distance of 63.72 feet along the Western 
property line and running a distwice of 73 feet along the 
Northmi in-operty line. Said parcel contains .23 acre. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

23. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Gulf Oil Co. - U.S., 
for a Condltioui Use Permit for an automobile service 
station and automatic car wash on certain i^operty 
located at the Southwest com« of Viqinia Beach 
Boulevard and Rosonont Road, ranning a distance of 
212.16 feet along the South side of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, ranning a distance of 170.13 feet along the 
Western property line, ranning a distance of 273.87 feet 
along the Southern property Une and running a distaiKC 
of 198.35 feet along the West side of Rosemont Road. 
Said parcel contains 1.029 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

24. 

An Ordinance upon i^lication of Gulf Oil Cto. - U.S., 
for a Conditional Uae Pcradt for an autraiatfe car wash 
on certain propoty located on the North side of 
Northampton Boulevard b^inning at a pdnt 190 feet 
East of Baker Road, ranning a distance of 340 feet 
along the North side of Northam^mi Boule^wd, 
running a distance of 202.82 fed along the Eastern 
property line, ranning a distance of 149.10 feet along 
the Northern pr(q)erty line and running a ^^ittanrc of 
259.88 feet along the We^on pmpaty line. &dd pared 
contains 1.131 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUOH. 

25. 

An (^(finance upon Apidicatkm of W.R. Malbon. Jr., 
and T.M. Malbon for a CeadMoMi Vm PcnaH for a 
borrow {rit on cotain propmy loctted 330 feet Soi^ <^ 
Old Dam Neck Road beginnfaig at a point IKO feet 
more or less East of DwyCT Road, mm^ a dte«ee of 
637.76 feet in a Swthwe^erty diiection, nmiteg a 
distance <rf 643.40 feet in a NorthwcMa^ dfa«etfM. 
running a distance of 1009.37 feet in a SouthweA^ 
dirKtkMi. nmning a dittany of Sf»,l$ feet te a 
SoutM-ly direction, running a (Umumc of \9ftM feet 



/ 



In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
CityofVirania Beadi, on 
the 21st da^ of September. 

Virginia Marie O'NeO, 
Plaintiffs agnoit JUchard^ 
O'Ndl. Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATl(»f 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a dlvcnrw a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant iqx>n 
the grounds of die parties 
having lived sq^arate and 
ttput without ' oohabita- 
ticmand withoul taiterrup- 
tion fw a poiod in excess 
of OM ytaii 

And an affidavit having 
been made and flkd that 
the defendant is not a 
residat of Uw State of 
Viiginia, the hut known 
post office address being 
P.O. Box 362. Berwick, 
Louisiana it is oirdered 
that Rkhard O'Neil do 
i^ipear on or befwe the 
16th of November. 1979, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
htterest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

Jdm V. Fentress, Clerk 

By: Linda Noel Hill, 

DqiNityOerk 

Berg ud Ckwdon, p.q. 
2933 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Vuginia Beach, Va. 

9/26, 10/3. 10/10. 10/17 



having lived separate and ' 
apart without colabita- 
tkiB ud w^ut Jnteinq>- 
tion for a period in excess 
ofoneyev. ... 

,0 ''v .ilt; I3UM3 1 i J ibi 

And an affidavit having^ 
beta made and filed 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Viigjnia. the last known 
post office address b^ig p 
2024112 116 Ave. St. Al- 
bany. New York tt is 
ordered that Linda Mani- 
gauh do Kppeu on ot 
befme the 16 of Novem- 
ber, 1979, and do what 
inay be necessary to pio- 
ttfct her mterest in this 

/A copy-Teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Lfaida Noel Hitt, 
Dqnity Qerk 

Berg and Gordon, p.q. 
2933 Virgmia Beach BWd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17 



In the Ctat's Office of 
the Oicuit OMirt <tf tlte 
Ctty of Virginia Beach, on 
tlM 21st day of Septonber, 
1979. 

CuAril Artlntf Mraipuk. 
PWatfff, i«aiait Lfaula 
M— i^attit, 0^eadmtt. 

publk:ation 

Ite^^ct si tfate nk to 
to lAMi a iSvoroe a 
vinflilo matrin^tf from 

the grouA of the pvtiei 



VIRGINL\: In the Circuit 
Cmirt of the Qty of 
Virginia Beach the 21st 
day of September, 1979 

Re: Estate of L^lia B. 
Roper, Deceased 

SHOW CAUSE 
ORDER 

It appearh^ that a re- 
pwt of the aoanmts of 
^^rgiiiia f^ttkinal j^uk, 
D(»<^y L. &evenson and 
Berryman Qnm, IV, Per- 
KMud Rqxesoitathwt of 
the Esttte of Lydia B. 
Roper, Deceased, and of 
the debts and Hom^n fi, 

a^iinst her estate has been 
filed in the Clerk's Offke 
of thto O^t and O^tt nx 
BUMtths have dqaed rtue 
the qutf flcatkm of radi 
P«noBal Repicaeatetlvet. 
it is i^wn their flMdm, by 



I: 



ORDERED that the 

a«^umot, md an oth«s 

hi^nMed hi, the atite do 

^ow cane, if uqt ttey 

can, cm Oe 19th di^ of 
October, 1979 at 9:00 



mtm 



Xl*!^ 



^^^^^mmmmmmmmammmfmmmm 



tm^^^^^m 



mm 




VnOEII HtMoe fkm whli 
any pmkm of n or 
more wUk Uiey last be- 
ginntaf October 2. Pitty 
Clin CMft Slop, aoo Bik- 
er lU»d.. Va. Bch.. Vi. 
497-9764. 
2 1CN> 10-3-79 

CALL ALTON. Hie beit 
ftind laisiBg i^t^ram yet. 
For hmnewives, icbmds, 
dubs, and (^gaakations. 
No bnwttiiKBt. 50 pocent 
Iftottt, 3^2766. 

2 4CBD10^79 

WHY TAIE A CHANCE 

We can guaran^ tbe fiOe 
of your hcmie. Dra't 
make the mittake of Imv- 
ins two mottgite pay- 
ments. Call Jim Cochrane 
at 420.3120. Higghis Real- 
ly Inc. 
2 4 CBD 10-10-79 

WANTED: your 

household extras - 
clothing, furniture and 
junk - by Friends Sdiool 
Thrift Store. All 
donations are tax 
deductiUe. Prompt, free 
pickup. CaU 428-7841. 

2TF 

BATTLEFIELD Motors - 

449 N. Battlefield Blvd. 
i4)|vedates your buiineu 
tot ttkadfy, oouneeus 
service and fair honest 
prices -r >nait OS todqr or 
call 347-7860. 

NON-COMOSIONED 
OFnCEKS ASSOC b 

aeddng counsdcNrs for the 
Hdewater area. Call Mr. 
Bunett at 499^19. Re- 
tired mifitary latferred. 
<2 CM-TF 



19» HONDA CmC. 
AM-FM ratUo, 6 mos. 
M, $1000 assume pay- 
mentt. Serious taiqidries 
only. 467-4221. 

6 4CBD 10/17 



T-Twdtt-Tiriiin lsi»i 



mm- 1969 custombied 
van, 6 c]l, staadsBd Aift, 
new patet ^ irith flmes, 
new rrtmllt molor, wagon 
niwebft new tins, AM- 
FM 8 tnck system, must 
Mil. S1600. 487-5864. 
7 1CBD9-26-79 



WE wax IVY used and 

junk automobiles. Call 

340-6902 anytime. 

8 TFCBD 



HAILEY - '70 Sportster 
XLH. New engine, trans- 
mission ft duhi, $1700 
fhm. 42041S2. 

9 1CBD9/26 

WHYWALXrrr when 
yott oaa ride a MO-PBDI 
SNASK^1979-i50mpg. 
Like oewl $»S. 481-1470 
9 4GDB9^26 



SENIOR ELIGIBILITY 

worker (announceittent 
#S04-79) include cbus title 
and aimounoement num- 
ber on line 2, Position 
Api^ied for, on State 
An)lkati(m form. QuaU- 
fkd af^licants are needed 
to add to employment 
lists(s) used to nil presmt 
and future vacancies in 
Virginia Beach or Colo- 
nial Heights, Va. Posses- 
sion of a baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited 
coU^ or univovity plus 2 
years of experience in 
digilHlity deternunation 
for assistance; or comple- 
tion of 3 ^ars of college 
fdus 3 years of experience, 
2 of w^ich must have been 
in eligibility determination 
for asBstanoe. The other 
year may have been in 
rdated onployment;* OR 
completion of 2 years of 
coO^ plus 4 years of 
experience, 2 of which 
must have beoi in eligiln- 
Hty determination for 
asdstance. The other 2 
yevs may have been in 
rdated emptoyment;* OR 
oomidetion of 1 year of 
coU^ plus 3 years of 
experience, 2 of wh 



TELLER • Part time exp. 
only need apply. Chesa- 
peake Bank ft Trust 547- 
3164. 
13 4CDB10'3 

REPORTERS - General 
assignments, featui^s, 
news editing with weekly 
newspapers in Swithside 
and Tidewater Virginia. 
PrefCT journalism sdool 
background and some 
experience. Must have 
good tyinng ability and 
be willhig to learn news 
phot(^raphy. If you are 
hitaested in more d^uls, 
write Itevid Woodruff, 
Byerly Publications, 1000 
Armory Drive, Franklin, 
Va. 23831. 
13 H-TF 

MATURE 9TTER in my 

home, to care for 4 chUd- 
ren while I am hospi- 
talized. Serious inquiries 
only. References. 467- 
4221. 



SIAMESE - Redpoint 
males aund females for fall 
shows. Bom in March, 
champion and grand 
diampion paroits. Shots. 
Prices reasomU>|e. Call 
387-1447 after 7 p.m. or 
weekends. 



WANTED ORIENTAL 
CARPETS~New or OM- 

Any condition, any age!!! 
461-3834 29/TF 

STEREO - Orown LC130 
Pre-amp, paid S400 new 
only used I year, $230, 
343-4326. 



ALL TYPES, NEW AND 

used restaurant and bar 
equipment. Dixie 
Equipment Company. 
1008 Granby St. 623-7073 
38/TF 



HOUSE worn RENT S. 

Norfolk - Decatur Street, 

2 bedroom, new interior. 

Basement workshop area, 

never before rented - walk 

to schools, 347-3101, 9 to 

3. 

33 4 CBD 10-3-79 



22 



4TH 10/10 



POODLE - 9 weeks, 
white, small toy, shou, 
$130. 460-3394. 



29 



4CBD 10/17 



22 



1CBD9/26 



POODLES - Puppies, 
AKC, registered, small 
toy, apricot, white, sliver, 
cream, 857-6430. 



ROOTING ft GUTIER- 

ING and repairs. Also 
used 4}|dicances, washing 
marines, stoves, dryers, 
reftigeratOT for sale. Call 
383-3290. 833-4093. 



3§-TVl8«a 



'PBBSON-TO-raBSON- 

TkaTs Us) -T«« ue Tmir 

LOCAL Nawapk^r 



TV STEREO radio con- 
. sole. Magnovox cokv tv- 
stereo radio combuution, 
solid cherrywood. $200 or 
best offer. 467-4221. 



70 H ow e Service 



29 



4CBD 10/17 



39 



4CBD 10/17 



22 



4CBD 10/17 



Sl-CalwandSlMipt 



far Ma 



CATS, neutered, shots, 
some kittens 587-1366. 



22 



3CBD 10/10 



13 



4CBD 10/17 



run 627-2446. 2 weeks 

(rfd, $130 registered. 

22 4CDB9-26 



N(HtVIEW- Rare corns - 
Norfolk's most omnplete. 
Buy, sdl, trade. Buying 
siker coins. 42 Southern 
Shopping Center, Nor- 
folk, 833-8118. 
31 CfiD-TF 



MOBILE HOME - Like 
new, 1974 Connor New- 
port 12 X 46, 2 bedromns, 
mostly furnished, can stay 
on lot. Asking $4200, 
price negotibie 487-2922 
after 6 p.m. 



UPHOLSTERY and sew- 
ing, dtairs $30 plus fabric, 
sofas SlOO plus fabric, 
CHESAPEAKE TRAD- 
ING CENTER. Buy, seU 
and trade, 343-9611. Free 
estimate!! 
70 4 CBD 10-17-79 



71-Servicts Offered 



^ 



CAVALIER KITCHENS 

offCTS Overton unfinished 

cabmets. High quality, 

low prices. We offer 

planning and installation, 

or do it yourself! 857- 

1433. 

71 CBD-TF 

AUTO CRUSHERS-A-1 - 

junk car removing. All 
cars towed away free, top 
dollar paid!!! Fast 

. Wice. 487-9222 7I/TF 

• 

LIGHT HAULING - 

Gardening, hedge trim- 
ming, lawn mowing, reas- 
on^le prices — call for 
estimate! 464-3634. 
71 CBD-TF 

BABYamNG in my 
home, any age. Hilltop 
area. 423-7107 



71 



4H 10/10 



40 



4TCBD 10/10 



14-PvtHiaM WaaAid 



134M^VNalai 



FLVMOUIH . 1977 Vo- 
lare Premier Sta. Wgn. 
Air^ 'adt<»ntlc, power 
Jaalua^ft^ steerioi, 6040 



•eatt, super 6 ca^c, new 
brakes, new TwUali. 14000 
or bert t^cr. 426-2049. 
6 4 CBD 10-17-79 

PINTO • 1978. 2300 en- 
gine, air. power stening, 
sun roof, sport mfafiors, 
sport steering wheel. 
$3900. 468-5807. 
6 1 CBD9-26-79 

FOB SALE '75 Owvy 
Van; Paoeied. carpeM. 
AM-FM; 8 tnck Stereo/4 
speaker, sink, Hid»^A- 
Bed. V-8 Antomatk. out- 
side power fbtK 7.000 
MLS on New en^ne, 
$3,000. 855-5417. 
6 4Cn>9-26-79 

PON1IAC - '72. 4 door. 
CataUna, exodlent r^air. 
fiiOyeipdpped. ^95. 623- 
1434. 

6 2CBD9/26 

CHEVBOUNCr • 1977 
Window ^xxrtt Van. Ex- 
cdknt rannii^ ooodbioo, 
V4, AM-FM. stereo ttpe 
deck. can>^ed. power 
brakes ft iMfhife regalar 
gas. 588-2736 
6 4 CBD 10-10-79 

MG- '75 Midsatt. Bhw. 

exodlott ctmditteii. 7.000 

mb. AM-FM. S3400. 467- 

0781. 

6 lCBD9'26-79 



AdveiHsiiig 

Sales 
CommMiiit} 
NcwsiMpers 

We're growing, come 
grow with us! New^aper 
advertising experRBCes 
helpful but not necenary 
if you have a backpouad 
in business or marketing 
>r caeeer^ potential. F^H 
Hme^xisbifn -- safauy - 
commission ~ expenses 
or comlrinatkm. Opm- 
ings in Chesapeake or 
Vbgbiia Beach - write or 
call in peiaon (no phone 
calb idease) Donald R. 
Frye, Oen. Mgr. Byerly 
PuWcati(HUk PiMidiers 
of the Vbgbiia Beach Sun 
ft the Chesapeake Post 
P.O. Box 1327 Chesa- 
peake. Va. 23320 

.; 13/tf 

SALES HOLIDAY 
MAGIC COSMmCS- 

Opportmity to ad^^moe 

to management. Liberal 

commbsloD, car hdpfiil, 

tkkwater ttca. Call 467- 

4040. No investment 

required. 

13 CDB-TF 

PART-TIME cleaning 
J(4), ne e d e d 1 penra to 
fy^f OB hcwiwhohi diorcs 
OBoe tf twkc a week. You 
muM tiu^A your own 
transpoctatbM. 547-2019. 
13 4CU)10'10-79 



HOUSEKEEPER, 1 day a 

wedc. Vf^pbt Rklge area. 
Own transportaticm. Call 
after 6. 48^3709. 

must have been in eligibi' — 
lity determination for 
asdstance. The other 3 
years may have been ui 
rehtted employment;* OR 
graduation from high 
school or possession of an 
equivalency phis 6 years of 
experience. 2 of which 
must have been eligibi- 
lity determination for 
asdstance. The other 4 
years may have been in 
retated emidoymmt.* 

*E]q)erienoe bivdving 
respMidble working rda- 

tionships whh pi^e sudi Q^p, yojjg q^j, 
as: taiterviewmg tar em- hiqhly PROFITABLE 
'P'oy"*!^^.-^^"^^***^ iAHUcBBAUTP-UL Bhie 
lodal work dde, day care Shop. Mademoiselle 



24-Hai ses CalUe, etc. 



[^ 



SZ^IambyftWalclMi 



PEKFECr PART-TIME 

job. Do you love plants ft 
peoirie? Must be 18 and 
have own transportatioft. 
CaU Oabe, (919) 433- 
2282. 



14 



2CBD9/26 



2 YR. old ^Mloosa stud 
pony. Needs work, great 
disposition, call iffter 6. 
$500. 421-9320. 
24 4 CBD 10-24-79 

8 YR. old purebred regis- 

tercfi Arabian gelding. 

15.2 hands, needs eqieri- 

enced rider, tack included 

call after 6 p.m., $1500. 

421-9320. 

24 4 CBD 10-24-79 



STERLING SILVER 
BAND - rize S'A. Saggi- 
tatus and Vbgo signs ui 
rabed sterUng lovdy and 
differem. $25 <» best 
offer. Call 482-1768 after 
6 p.m. 
32 H-TF 



CONNER- 1976, 12x70', 
2 bedroom, 2 bath. $300 ft 
assume. Available im- 
mediately. 588-3442. 

40 1CBD9/26 

19n CASTLE, 12x30, 2 
bedroom, all new furni- 
ture, $4300, 487-1327. 
40 4 CBD 10-3-79 



w^^VVwVVv 



45-ApirlnMrts fir RmI 



2Mrtldis for Sale 



FIREPLACE Wood-Pick- 
up load of mixed, deli- 
vered $33.00. After 6 p.m. 
421-7350. 
34 4 CBD 10-17-79 



YOUR 



AIR C0NIM110NER - 

Sean, 6,000 BTUs, like 
new, $100. 486-36n. 



LOVELY fumbhed- 1-2 
bedroom apartment with 
color TV. Available, 
through May. ReasoniAily 
priced. Pacific West 
Apartments. Motel 306 
29th St. 428-3633. 

4S/TFCI® 

43 



.2?, 



1 CBP,9-26.79 



aidrw^ eommumty aide; 
teaching; siqpervisor of 
staff: office managonent 
involving relationships 
with other staff; nunhig; 
or reception work involv- 
big handling requests and 
data secured frmn the 
public. 

For a detailed outUne of 
duties and responsibilities 
vidt your local VEC. 
Sabuy: $934.11 - $1246 
per month' (dependJng on 
experfence) (Chesterfidd 
or Colonial Heights) 
$896.16 per numth (Va. 
BeadO. State applications 
are available from locd 
offices of VEC ft State 
agency penonnd offices ft 
must be reod^^ by 3:00 
p.m., October 2, 1979 at 
P.O. Box 1104, Rich- 
mond, Va. 23206. Servmg 
equal opportunity 
cn9k>ycrs. 



FashicMis offers t^ uni- 
que opportunity. Brand 
names sudi as Lee, Levi, 
Wrangler, Faded Okirx, 
Male, Landlubber, and 
over 30 other natioially- 
known brands ami related 
sportswear. $15,500.00 
Grand Opeidng promo- 
tion. For biformation pall 
214-634-2066 V for Mr. 
WOkerson. 



FOR SALE - Gibson Ab- 
weep, 24,000 B.T.U. 'sab 
conditioner, SlOO, Ken- 
more Dbhwasher, $30, 
Gas power lawnmower, 
$15,428-5861. 



25 



2CBD9/26 



26-ARtiqMS 



15 



IP 9/26 



ILEA MARKET for sale 

-Owners Rnanee! Lo- 
cated at 2642 Campostdk 
Road, Oiesapeake. Please 
call 545-6944 or 545-9071 
15 4CDB9-26 



PAHS STREET FLEA 

MARKET-Open Thurs.- 
Sun. 10-6. Come on m ^ 
browse 'round! 8 different 
shops. 3430 Azalea 
Garden Rd. 857-0477. 

28/tf 



IRUR ims, ^trees, 
- bcny pleats, gmpe vises,-; 
hmdsa^Mngidant material 
-offered by Vb^ni»'+ 
targest growers. Free copy 
48 page Phmtmg Guide 
cataioc bi color, on re- 
quest. WayaedKKo Nur- 
series- Waynesboro, Va. 
22980 
35 4 CBD 10-23-79 

AZALEA. FORSYTHIA, 
AIUGA. 8", $5.00 per 
docca, 2 year old camd- 
Uas, red, $1.00 ~ unUmit- 
ed, 423-2104, or write 
P.O. Box 9862, Wright 
Station, Granby St., Nor- 
folk. 23505. 
35 4 CBD 10-3-79 



SS^FlirBaMirSab 



POUR 9O0M HOUSE 

for rent, furnished, 2 lots 
in a nice trailer park and , 
its quiet. 421-2823. 
53 2 CBD 9-26-79 



iH s m u cnoN 



PROTECT YOUR 
INVESTMENT - join the 
others in Tidewater who 
are having me profession- 
ally clean and Simonize 
theb automobile. For ap- 
pointment call Bill, 486- 
1537. 
71 CBD-TF 

WE PRINT newspaper, 
circulars, shopping 
guides, anything on news- 
print, with or without 
composition aind camera 
ser^tos. We take orders 
for small tabloid newspa-' 
pers with press runs as 
low as 1,000 and we print 
for bigger publications 
with 30,000 and more cir- 
culation. We've got lots 
of Tidewater area cus- 
tomers because we're 
good, we're dependable 
and we're local. Please 
call Donald R. Fryc. 547- 
4571, for information 
and price quotations. 
You will be dealing with 
Byerly Publications, pub- 
lishers of the Chesapeake 
Post and the Virginia 
Beach Sun. 

71/tf 



TOP PRICE PAID FOR 

junk cars - also late 

model sidvagc.Call 545- 

3517. 

71 CBD-TF 

ROTO-TILLING Fall 
Special. 25^ off for gar- 
den or new lawn, any size, 
area. 48^2779 

2 4a 9/26 

MR. ft MRSI PAINTERS 

of |he Tidewater area. The 
quality of a man- the 
smooth touch of a 
woman. Interior-exterior 
painting. 424-4687. 

71/TF CDB 
71 

GOOD LUCK CmM- 
NEV SWEEP SERVICE- 
Don't risk chimney fires! 
Licensed and insured pro- 
fessional methods - We 
won't leave ydiFTBrtHe 
dust! 547-1226. 
71 CBD-TF 



BABYSITTING - I^y 

home — in — Brigadoon.- 
Weekdays only. 467-4430. 
71 4 CDB 10-3 




22 



Pats 



-rBBSOM-TO-PBBSON- 
naf a ObI .Tea mat Taar 



KTITENS to a 
good home, dx wedcs dd. 
one yellow male, 2 calico 
females. 347-2952. 



ESTATE CLOSE out 

Garage Sale. 1010 Pdn- 
itexter, S. Norfolk, Sept- 
ember 22, 9-5. Antique 
furniture, toob, wickn, 
1910 Bakers cabinet, 
porch swing, trunks, 
others. 



22 



2rBD9-26 28 



1CBD9/26 



COLONY 

HOME SITES FOR SAU 

FOR 

People phmniag Homes 
A Custom Bnliders 

SALES OFFICE 
333 Providence Rd. 

CAU 4C44317 



W S- Ov( of ulnc 

OfUtorSMMMM. SUtMillNa Wi. 

•VMsrsttBaMialLsnssI 
TtKHtiTalmltt^tXi 
tsOMf 



■tOMSfsEnsrtMMi 
stiisttisitaasii 

•WhisNOrsnrscsrrMiai- 

4saEscsmsMk|4«Miil 



•«MitnlsRiTlH(S«ssfes) 

•taOatlawapliartrt. 
IMMTtaaSsLaMSK 

•OwTMM«i 
UMailSu 

psasfsiai? 

•WiW sllsisnli ^_ 



NOW HIRING! 

($108 Per Week Part Time) 

PifMSM ■eaded far taieplMiie aperatars. WE TRAIN 
Fal and part toe Msahigi. Day and e v ewhi g sMfts 
avawMa. Apply la panaa, Haa. - FrL. batwaaa 11 aja. 
and 7 p.aL at 1S24 NawtMni Rd. (Iba larry Bidg.), 
acraaa tram to CHtaaM Trwt Baak, SSSO Nowtowa 



VA. B€ACH 
n4-4aM7D7 



AUTORECYCLERS 
NOW BUYING 

HIQNiST PRICCS PAID FOR- 

•RadMan *Fraa Tawing 

CHMAPiiIKi 
SALVAM CORP. 

laiS MmI Slraat 4t7-66 10 



BBIWVTMSMF 

$is.aM.H m ntt 

nuniM 
iM,aa9.MvaiTui 

f flU TMM MmiMlllt I 
(RTlOir AflNSOl PABtl 
HMEiS&il* 
DURO SUPil GIVI H* 

MliUONSIHI 

ipmiwnnmN 




Hm SdMel taaril «# dHOor of Vkifaiia BeMb. Owner SMdMl Udi 
for TiM CMtdt etamamy School Air CoodUcN^ Modiflcaik» for 
dM Schod BOiRl of dM dor of V^aia BaMk. Viixfaria Bcoch, 
VbliBit «« be roeiiMd br H. S. Abcntthy. Clirk of die bond In dw 
Bowd Itooa of tbe School AfdWabtiUioa Buikli^, PtbKCH Abm 
SMoo. ^ni!^da Isocfc. Vbiiaia iHdi 2.-Q0 o'dodt Local PKvdias 
Itae oa t a ee day . October 9. 1979 mi dicn at laid office pubHdy 
opcaad and read aiottd. 

The iKoeedM* for widMkawai of Wdiihan be aocotdiiis to Chapter 4, 
Sn^doB 1 1 -10. 3(1) of dw Code of ViqlBia. 

TiM Onsnl Caatncl hio be awarded oa a hiav nmi batb ud 
kKiadH aB week ai dallMd h dw Oottract Docwneus. 

Onwtati and Spedflcidaae tm be mod at die Dodge Plan Room, 
Noiftft, Vh^da. the BiAdm nd COairactoa Eachante, Norfolk, 
^ntshda. 

Sm of Drawiiii* aad Spadfleadom nay be obiaiotd at the office of 
the Cmhiair. OM Doadaieii Baeiaeeriog. lacoiperaie^, Fembrdw 
Office tab, PwSbroli Rye, Soto 210, Vir^nla Beadi. Vin^nia 
aisn, apoa appNcadge teoaavaHded by a depodt of S1S.00 p« M. 
I^ea nca^ of die ooaviiM M of dnwii^ nd ^edflMtiom, 
aAMilea dQfi iilw dM bid c^eataf dale, dcpotto wU be leftnded n 
All » Obomsmh «he nbndi Ud^ aad $10.00 to Ddwn. Falne a 
MMadwooBiplaieHlsi^Ma tOdayi wfl ooo^Malc forfcltiirc ^the 



AovEitTB»4^ Hi. inr 



BM Simltr: A Hddcr'i bead or oertifled check wUbc nquired ia te 
M of aoi iM Am Ave pereiai of die Beee Bhl. The Md boad 
be ia a wtad «a AIA Docwaat A3I0, or la tfet iam« foim, and 

lor a period ^ net IM dna « dm after the Ud openhv due. Bond 
rt ha mahit » dw School Bottd <tf the aty of ^^iffada 



the ri|hi to wrin tafonnHtiet and to Inject any 



TkeOwaar 
erslMdk 



I flHHHMHi m aiTCHB w Bw ra^Hf^nsB or 1 loe m, i naprff 7, 
oftherodeofVliihilapeftaliihutOfnlitiitlon 



Gagj^^^^g^ 



The School Bovd of (he City of Virginia Beach, Owner Scaled bids 
for The Seaiack Ekmemary School Air Conditioning Modiflcation 
for the School Bowd of the City of Virginia Beach, Virginia Beach, 
ViqMa wU be received by H. S. Abemathy, Oerfc of the Boerd in the 
Board Roan of die School Adndaimtion Boilding, Princess Anne 
Station, Virgfaiia Beach, Virginia until 2.-00 o'eiocfc Local Prevailing 
rant on Tuesday, Ooober 9, 1979 and then at said office pubBcly 
opened and read aloud. 

The procedure for withdrawal of bids shall be according to Chapter 4. 
Seaion t l-ao. 2(1) of ihe Code of Virginia. 

The Genual Contract is to be awarded on a hunp sum basis and 
includes tf work as defined in the Contract Documenis. 

Drawtags and Spedflcatioos may be lecn at die Dodge Kan itoom, 
NorfM. Virginia, the BuOdert aad Comracttn Exchai^e, Norfdk. 
Vb-ginia. 

Seu of Orawh^ ami SpecMcatioai may be obiaiaed at die offloc Of 
die Enghieer, OU Deadidoa Fagjaeiring. Incoriioraied, itabrokc 
Onkt park, ft^bn^ Hve. Sidle 210, Viitfria Beach, Virgfada 
2I4«. eooa a^Hntioa aeeonparied by a d^e* of $2S4» per set. 
l^on rco^ or the amflmt m of dran^^e aad vedfloaioas, 
wMria tea days aAer dw Md ^ed^ date, depmta wA be rdhnded in 
M MCeenaaois who Mbadi Wt, aad SIO.0BW oihm. PadMe to 
Mwi the oooiplM Ms wiiMa W dqa wBI cowrtMe forfttore ^ the 
deport. 

M Security : A MMer-s bond or omified cbedt wU be levied h the 
amouM of not tmihan (he p«ecm of the Baal Bid. The bM bcMid 
AtM be executed <w AIA Dacuaieai A) 10, or hi the snne form, ami 
(M a pmod of not has d«B M dm after the Md opcBi^ «tt. Bond 
or chedt Shan be pebble to the School Board (rf the Cky (rf V^Ma 

The OwnCT mervcs the 1^ to write iaformtMiai aad 10 r^ «iy 
oraUM^. 

BiddKH aHOHton is bivhcd to Aw M^dranents ariMe H, Ctapiff 7. 
of the nde of Vir^aia penrintag 10 r^stiation . 

TheSaMlBondoflhe 



lAviammmwikmk 

The School Board of the City of Virginia Beach, Owner Sealed bids 
for The Unkhoro Park Elemencary School Air Conditioning 
Motffkaiioa for the School Board of the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virgbiia Beach, Vfagbda will be received by H. S. Abemathy, Clerk of 
die Board in die Board Room of the School Administration BuOittiw. 
Princess Anne Station. Virginia Beach, Virginia undl 2.-00 o'dock 
Local Prevailii« Time on Tuesday, October 9, 1979 and then at said 
offioc pubiidy opened and rend akwd. 

The procadwe for withdrawal of bids shall be according to Chapter 4, 
Section 1 1-20. 2(1) of the Code of Virginia. 

The General Comiacl is to be awarded on a himp sum basis and 
indudes all work as defined in the Comract Documenis. 

Drawtagi aad Spedflcations may be seen at the Dodge Ptaa Room, 
Nerfoft, Viqfada, the Bidden and Contractors Exchaiwc, NorfoOi, 
Vhghria. 

Sett of Orawfaigs and SpedficatioM may be obtriaed at tte office of 
dM linglaafr. OU Ooninioo Engineering. Incorporated. Nnbrokc 
Office Part. Pembroke Five. Suite 210, Virgkda BeaA. Vk)^nia 
2340, apoa appHcaiioo aeRmipanied Iqr a depodi of S0A per set. 
I^oa reodpi ef dw csavicMsct of drawhip aad yedWcatiow, 
wMda Ma dap after the Md opening date, deposits will be icftaaded hi 
t\M to CaalradBn who submit bids, and SIO.OO to others. PaBurc to 
the coaipiiM kis wUiin 10 days will constitute forfcitare ot the 



Bid Security: Abiddcr's bend or ccrtifled dieck wM be retired in the 
amouni of not lets Ann Ave percent of tN Bmc Wd. The bid bond 
shiM be eKecHied on AIA Document A3 10, or hi the saae tetm, aad 
lor a period (rfaoi ICH ihM M dm sftcr the bid opening date. Bond 
or check ihrii be payable to the S^od Board tf dw Cky of Virginia 
Beach. 

The Owacr rcaervet the r^ to wrive iafotaMiMea and 10 ^ed Miy 
orrthhte. 

Bidder's attention h hivited lo the requiremcms of Htk M, Chapter 7, 
of the code of Vbgiiria pertaining to registration. 



The SdNurf Boards the 
C^ of Vh^da Beach 



AOVERTISEMEkf WftUBS""^""'^"' 

The School Board of Ihe City of Virginia Beach, Owner Sealed bids 
for The Cooke Elementary School Air Conditioning Modification for 
the School Board of ihe Ciiy of Virginia Beach, Virginia Beach. 
Virginia will be received by H . S. Abernathy, Qerk of ihe Board in the 
Board Room of the School Administration Building, Princess Anne 
Sittioo, Virginia Beach, Viiynii until 2:00 o'clock Local Prevailing 
Tfanc on TueKfaiy, October 9, 1979 and then at said office publicly 
opened and read aloud. 

The procedure for wiilidrawal of bids shall be according to Chapter 4, 
Section 11-20. 2(l)of the Code of Vi^nia. 

The General Contract is to be awarded on a lump sum basis and 
mchides att work as defined in the Contract Documents. 

Drawings and Specificuions may be seen at ihe Dodge Plan Room, 
hktrfolk, Virginia, the Builders and Contradors Exchange, Norfolk, 
Vir^nia. 

Seu of Drawings and Spccificaiions may be obtained at the office of 
the Enpaeer, OU (Ximinion Engineering, Incorporated, Ponbroke 
Office Park, Ponbroke Five, Suite 210, Vbghda Beach, \1rgb^ 
2)4(2, upon applicatiMi Kcompanied by a deposit of S25.0O pe set. 
Upon recdpl of ihc compieie set of drawings and qiedflcatiaM, 
witirin ten days after the bid (^lening date, deposits will be refunded in 
laB to QsMractors who submit bids, and SIO.OO lo oihen. Failure to 
leiura the ooaiplcie sets wiiliin 10 days will comtkwe forfeitiire of the 



Bid Seoirity: A bidder's bwid or certified chcdi «m be requiiad ia^ 
amouni of not less than five percent of the Bast Md. The bid bead 
iMI be exwuied on AIA Document AJIO, or in the tame fora^ mi 
for a period of noi less than 60 days after the Hd opening ^ic. UM 
or check Miall be payable lo ihc School Board of the C hy of Vii^ia 



Tha Owner icmtvcs the r^t to wdve hiformaHtka and to lajaa any 
ortfMds. 



's MMntion is invited to the l eq ult e awn ts irfTMe S4, fTiaiiMi 7, 
tf dM code of Virginia pertaMiag to re^rttion. 

The S^ool Board of Ihc 
q^afVfcpaial 



«nv:% 



iTiJ%^^ 



mn^^^^m^mmm^^n^mmm 



V 



\\ 



12 VIRGINIA BEACH SUN D WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 26, 1979 

Beach, blind & boat 



hunting 



•yBD LEWIS 



AU day Friday 1 kept a constant watch on the 
^»'e»ther. There was a high pressure eel! up in New 
England that was causing northeast winds in the 
Tickwater area, but it was not strong enough to cause 
any abnormal tides. If trie high pressure cell would 
remain over New England until Sunday, i figured the 
northeaster would increase in velocity and cause some 
high tides in the area. 

On Saturday, the high pressure cell was still there, 

and the northeaster was increasing. By Sunday, small 

^craft warnings had been posted by the National Weather 

Service, and the tides were running two feet above the 

normal high water mark. 

Many people would probably think I was taking up 
weather watching as a hobby or plotting storm fronts, 
but only a rail banter would itaow wkat wu really going 
on. I had been watching and waitfng for the pcrfMt day 
to go marsh hcnning, and it came on Monday. 

Monday morning at 7 a.m., I departed Chesapeake in 
the company of one of my hunting buddies, Ed Kaul. 
Ed, who is an avid hunter, had never been rail hunting 
and was pretty excited about the trip. 

He Is from Pennsylvania and has hunted everything 
from deer to pheasant, but raU birds was a spedcs of 
game that was not native to his home. So this trip to the 
Eastern Shore was a real treat for him. 

As we were crossing the Chesapeake Bay Bridge- 
Tunnel, the effects of the strong northeaster could be 
seen. White caps were everywhere and the spray from 
the seas that were cras^iing against the man-made 
islands were blowing across the roadway on the bridge. 
It was perfect; I knew we were going to slay them. 

By the time we reached Oyster, Virginia, the wind had 
picked up considerably, and I was sure we were going to 
have it rough and probably get pretty wet. I told Ed to 
wear his foul weather jacket and tennis shoes. I knew 
the jacket wouldn't keep us dry, but it would break the 
wind and keep us warm, and on a day like this, boots 
would not only be useless but also a hazard should the 
boat capsize in the rough water 

I think the weather was causing Ed to have his doubts 
about my sanity because I hadn't called the hunt off. He 
assured me that if it was too rough to go, he would not 
be too upset, but this is the weather conditions 1 wanted. 

I knew that once we had made it out to the marshes 
the water would be aiui calmer. Getting there was going 
to be the adventnrt . i would have felt alot better had I 
had my IS foot Chincoteague scow; I was using my 



Fishing tackle power loss 



father's 12 foot scow, and in this kind of weather the 
extra three foot could make alot of difference. 

It was really rough heading out of Oyster harbor. 
Once we had cleared the harbor I knew the only way we 
could make it was to head straight into the northeaster 
until I got into the leaward of Elkin's Marsh and then 
head off shore from there. 

Ed was pretty calm, alot of people I have hunted and 
fished with would have demanded 1 turn around and 
gone back, but not him. I think the thrill of the ride and 
his desire to hunt had enhanced him to the point that he 
would have swam there if he had had to, and besides 
that, he was busy trying to keep his shotgun under the 
bow to protect it from the weather. After about five 
minutes of having the seas break clean over the boat and 
completely soak everything, he conceded that it was 
useless and laid the gun down beside him. 

Once we reached Elkins' March and started heading 
off shore things were better. Although the marsh was 
almost completely covered by the high water, it was 
shallow enough to break the waves down to a short 
chop, and we were no longer in any danger of capsizing 
or swamping. 

We headed to the north end of the marsh that I 
wanted to gun. I knew that it would be useless to try and 
pole into this wind so I decided to let it work for us. 
Once we reached the north end of the marsh we cut the 
motor and cocked it up so that the wind would blow us 
across the marsh. If wasn't long before I spotted a 
couple of hens swimming. I knew they would fhub as 
we got closer, so we were ready, and it paid off. We 
bagged them both! Within half an hour we had 
seventeen birds; the action had been fust. We needed 
thirteen more birds to make our limit and I knew how 
we could get them. 

1 spotted an old duck blind about 200 yards to the east 
of us; so I started the motor and ran to the northeast of 
it and cut the motor. Hie wind did the work for us; the 
only poling I had to do was to shove us back in line with 
the blind so we wouldn't miss it. 

As we got closer to the blind I saw one bird swim for 
it; Ed had also seen him. I told him to get ready because 
there must be at least thirty birds hiding in there and we 
could top off our limit. I think he thought I was pulling 
his leg, but it wasn't long before I made a believer out of 
him. When we got close the birds started flushing, and 
the fun began. 

Birds were Jumping in every direction and we were 
counting out loud as we dropped them. Finally, we got 

Wax boats at end of season 



With few exceptions, 
the design and function of 
modern fishing tackle 
makes it better suited to 
heaving lures a long dis- 
tance than it is to hooking 
a fish. 

According to fishing 
experts, the combination 
of flexible rod, slip-drag 
reel and monofilament 
fishing line actually de- 
creases hook setting 
power. 

As many bass fishermen 
know, long whippy rods 
bend nearly full length 
when set against a striking 
fish. 

The rod becomes a 
shock absorber instead of 
a strength multiplier, rob- 
bing power from the hook 
at the end of the line. 

The need to control big 
fish in brushy impound- 
ments has dictated the 
development of short, 
stiff rods which can force 
a fish quickly out of 
flooded debris and into 
open water. 

Fishing line also robs 



Watch 
your 

savings 
soar. 



power from the hook. 

The resistance of water 
against the line claims 
some power, but the most 
loss occurs when you 
attempt to set the hook. 

Wet monofilament line 
will stretch as much as 40 
percent. 

While this is only 
momentary, it can 
account for as much §s 

SOD percent power loss at 
the hook. 

Ten pounds of pull on 
the line at the rod trans- 
-lates to only two pounds 
of pressure at the hook. 

Add together the loss 
caused by the bending 
rod, the stretching line 
and the slipping of the 
reel's drag, and you can 
see why many fish are not 
securely hooked. 

The next time you haul 
back on the rod to set the 
hook, and brag about 
"crossing his eyes," 
remember that it's likely 
that the fish barely feels 
the force. 



DONT BE A SPEEDER 

Drive with care, don't be ■ 
tpeeder, you misht nin over a 
want ad reader! 



Whether it's your car or 
boat, applying a coal of 
wax cnhuficcs the 
brilliance of the finish and 
protects , it from sun^ and 
din. 

But some boat owners 
are surprised to find that 
many manufacturers of 
fiberglass boats 

recommend another good 
waxing at the end of the 
season. , 

The reason is sound. 
The "gel coat," or 
pigmented resin on the 
outer surface of 
fiberglass, is slightly 
porous. 

This allows air and the 
sun's rays to get in and 
around microscopic bits 
of resin on the surface, 
which accelerates 
oxidation and consequent 
chalking of the surface. 

Over the years, repeated 
chalking takes gel coat off 
bit by bit. 

So by shutting out the 
air and turning away the 
sun's rays, a good wax job 
can keep a boat looking 
fresh and new for many 
more seasons. 

As air or sun will get at 
the boat even when it is in 
storage, the end-of-season 
waxing thus makes sense. 



Here are. some 
suggestions: 

First wash off a dirty 
boat. ^- 

Jlemove slight cbalking#-~^ 
imbedded scum and dead 
pigment with fiberglass 
cleaner-polish. 

Then wax. It's best to 
use only wax made and 
labeled specifically for 
fiberglass boat use. 

Many non-marine 
waxes are of high quality 
but now and then you can 
encounter one that turns 
milky when near water, 
spreads and buffs hard on 
fiberglass, gets sticky 
under the sun's heat, or 
has some other unwanted 
quirk. 



the birds we needed and stopped shooting. While we 
were gathoing up the birds we could see alot of flie 
birds that we had flushed heading back to the blind. So 
we started the motor and ran over to some other hunters 
and told them where they could top off their limit, and 
we then headed back to Oyster. 

There was no doubt in my mind that we would ha^ 
killed over a hundred birds had we not stuck to our limit 
of thirty. 

The trip back to Oyster was as nerve rackini as the 
trip out. The following sea wasn't wetting us as it did 
going out, but when they came up on your stern and you 
were caught in the trough between it and one running 
ahead, you got a real sinking feeling in your stomach. 

But the trip had been worth It aU. Ed admitted that it 
waa the beat vniAng day he had ever had. The cfTiCt 
the Morm had on us wonM be wnabed nway tai a hot 
shower and a platter full of southern fried marsh hens. 

Oopite the wc«ther, the fishing hasn't l)een all that 
bad. liie only problem is putting up with the vdad and 
rain long enough to catch them. 

Harty anglers down at Harrison's Fishing Pier 
enjoyed some fine spot fishing and severd were 
rewarded with citation size fish. Herman Garrengo', the 
manager at Harrison's, toid me that Duval Hudson III 
of Haiiipton, Va.. caught himself a 24 oz. citation spot 
on Monday during the northeaster. On Tuesday, a Mr. 
Pettus of Norfolk caught a 19 oz. citation spot also. 
Herman tirfd me that the nuiiorlty of tlw qiot bcfaq 
canght wdgh horn 13 to M oi. which is a pretty |ood 
slieipot. 

Junie Absolom at the Lynnhaven Pier reports that the 
fishing is pretty good there for those that want to brave 
the weather. Junie told me that they are catching i^enty 
of large spot, croaker and puppy drum. So you might 
want to grab your foul weather gear and head down to 
one of the piers. 

All of the marinas that have off-shore charta* boats 
report that they were booked up over the weekend but 
had to cancel because of the weather. They are looking 
forward to some good fishing as soon as the weather 
breaks. 

Down at Nags Head the story is pretty much the 
same. Damen, at Tatem's Bait and Tackle, tdd me that 
the surf is extremely rough but that the fish are there. 
Damen said that anglers fishing from the catwalk on the 
Or^on Inlet Bridge are catching plenty of spot, croaker 
and grey trout. Ha toM me that dw northenrtar Ims 
btowa plenty of fbh hi doee to shwe and by the 
wcfkcnd the surf shoidd be settled down, and bodi pier 
and a surf flahcrman should e^}oy super fUdng. So you 
might want to head south for some good fall flshinc 
Dunen is usually pretty acurate with hit re]K»ts. 

Last week I told you that Natioiud HuntbifiBd 
Fishhig day was September 22 and 23. Well, if you 



missed it, don't feel bad. It was postponed due to the 
bad weather caused by the northeasts. It ima been 
fcschcdulcd for tMs weekend September 29 and JOth. 
Due to the change of dates some of the events and 
displays had to be changed, but it still appears that it 
will be a real fine outing for the entire family. 

The events already scheduled will include: some fine 
country miisic by Melissa Lewis and Countiy Magic, a 
skMt shoot-off between the police d^Mrtments. a metal 
detector tresure hunt (area will be salted with coins), a 
casting contest. Game Commission display. State Game 
Warden display, a snake {M-ogram by Jimmy Bonavita, a 
fish fry by the Norfolk County Anglers Club, cloiging 
by the Flatland Clc^^rs, skeet shooting, uid various 
hunt clubs will also have displays. Melissa Lewis will 
only be there on Sunday. Thh^i wVI get r^ng at loon 
and wind up at 6 p.m. It will be held at Portsmouth City 
Park so grab yom kids and come on out. It sounds like a 
lot of fun, and there is no admission charge. 



Sportsman award presented at Dane 



The lirst annual "Vir- 
ginia Sportsman of the 
Year" award was pre- 
sented to Jeff Dane of 
WTVZ.33 at the Norfolk 
In-The- Water Boat Show 
last weekend. The award 
is presented by Volvo 
P^ta to the person or 
persons who best typify 
and/or promote the 
marine environment in the 
State of Vuginia. Dane, 



one of Tidewater's most 
well known and respected 
fishemum, was the host of 
"The Tackle Box" for the 
past 17 ^ears. Starting 
September 28 Dane can be 

seen on "Jeff Dane's 
Great Outdoors," every 
Friday night at 8:30 on 
Tidewater's new television 
station, WTV2J-Channel 
33. 



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481-6401 



NOTICE TO PUBLIC OF REQUEST FOR 
-—T- RELEASEOF FUNDS 



Notice is hereby given that by October 4, 1979, the 
City of Virginia Beach will submit to the U.S. 
Detmrtment of Hoosiiig and Urfa(Mr Dev el opm ent 
(HUD) a request and certiflcation for the release of 
$130,000 of the City's 4th Year (1978-79) funds under 
Title I of the Housing and Community Development 
Act of 1974, reauthorized by Congress and amended as 
of 1977. The request and certification for the rdease of 
funds pertains to the Queen City Sewer activity. 

The scope and Mtivities involved in the Qacen City 
Sewer activity indlldes installation of gravity sewer lines 
and any necessary sewage pumping station. 

The Queen Gty taiget area includes the following 
streets: Carriiigton Avenue, Luxor Avenue, Sun 
Avenue, Tamer Avenue, and Queen City RMd. It may 
be necessary to acquire some utility easements to install 
the sewerage system. 

The City of Virginia Beach will undntake the project 
deso^bed above with Bloclc Grant funds from the U.S. 
Department of HUD under Title I of the Housing and 
Community Act of 1974, reauthorized by Congress and 
amended as of 1977. The City of Virginia Beuh is 
cotifying to HUD that the City of Vi^nia Beach and 
George L. Hanbury, in his official capacity as City 
MaiMiger, consent to accept the jurisdiction of the 
Federal courts if an action is brought to oiforce 
responsibilities in rdation to mvironmental reviews, 
decision maicing, and action: and that these 
responsilnlities have been satisfied. Tlie Iqal effect of 
this certification is that upon its qiproval, the City of 
Virginia Beadi may use the Block Grant funds, and 
HUD will have satisfied its responsibilities under the 
Itetional Environmoital Policy Act of 1969. HUD will 
accq>t an objet^on to iu approval of the release of 
funds and acoq^uice of the cmiflcation only if it is on 
one of the following bases: A) that the c^fication was 
not in fact executed by tlw chief e»cutive offier of the 
applicant; <Hr B) that applicant's environmental review 
record for the activity indicates omission of a required 
(todsion, filling, ot ttep an^icable to the project in the 
environmental review process. Objections must be 
prepved and submitted in a(xordance with the required 
l»x>ccdure (Title 24. Cocte of Fectaral Regulations, Part 
58), and may be addressed to HUD at 701 East Franklin 
Sutet, Richmond, Vir^nia 23219. Objections to the 
nkwK of fuMls (m tesea othCT than those stated above 
will no| be con»(fered by HUD. No objections revived 
after S:00 P.M. on Octobo* 18, 1979 will be conndered 
by HUD. 

The City of Virginia Beach has pre|Hu-ed an 
environmental review m^ord rcfardii^ the above 
wtivity fot which tlie rekue of^unds is sought. Hiis 
record may be reviewed in the Offiw of Htwring and 
Cmnmunity Devdoi»imit at 3(K 2&d &reet. from 9K)0 
A.M. to 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday, taxef^ on 
aatyhfrtiday. 

9/26 



i'^